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EN7237

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Shortman

Registered
Joined
Jun 19, 2001
I recently purchased and Enlight 7237c case and I have two 80mm fans. I attached one in the back directly under the power supply. The case is supposed to come with a mounting bracket for a fan in the front, but it didn't, and the site I bought it from said that the cases they sold didn't. So what I'm wondering is, what's the cheapest way to mount a fan in the front, or will the fan in the back suck enough air through the case?

Also, I got a CoolerMaster EP5-6I11 HSF with a thermal pad. Should I remove this pad and use thermal paste? If so, how do I apply the thermal paste and seat the fan and stuff. Sorry, I'm a newbie at this and this is the first system I've built.
 

Hoot

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Feb 13, 2001
Location
Twin Cities
Welcome to the forums Arnold. My EN-7237 came with a plastic mount for the front fan. Look at the cut-out on the front of the case. Lay an 80mm fan up against it, with the center of the fan centered on the built-in grill. Trace the four mounting holes and drill them out. Mount the fan on the inside with screws, lockwashers and nuts. For the sake of convention, mount it blowing into the case and the rear one sucking out.

Grasp the HeatSink & Fan (HSF) assembly firmly. Unsnap the first retainer clip and then unsnap the second one. Now you can relax your grip. Try not to let it jump around while unsnapping the clips.

Remove the pad from your HSF and clean away any residue on the HSF baseplate as well as the core on your CPU. Thats the raised square in the moddle with the writing on it. An easy solvent for cleaning is good old Gumout Carburetor cleaner, available form the local automotive store ar just about any department store. Apply a thin, even layer of heat sink compound to the core surface. It doesn't take much.

Reverse the removal process to re-install your HSF. This is a fell as you go process. I do not have the savvy to put it into words. Imagine that, Hoot at a loss for words. ;D

Good Luck

Hoot
 
OP
S

Shortman

Registered
Joined
Jun 19, 2001
There's a problem. When I tried to line up the fan, the precut holes always got in the way. No matter which way i aligned it, i couldn't get all four holes in the fan to line up with solid metal.
 

Hoot

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Feb 13, 2001
Location
Twin Cities
I seem to recall (it was a while ago) that I used one of the existing holes and wound up drilling only 3. Otherwise, go with as many as you can. There is no penalty for only using 3 or even 2 opposing corners.

Hoot
 

Keldogg

Registered
Joined
May 26, 2001
I had to use just the 2 corner screws to hold my PSU in for a while on my old case.
 
OP
S

Shortman

Registered
Joined
Jun 19, 2001
A friend suggested I just hot glue the fan to the case. Will this work decently? The thing I'm concerned about is vibration, but perhaps the hot glue will provide a cushion. The reason I ask is I don't have easy access to all the supplies to drill holes and put screws and washers in and stuff.
 

Hoot

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Feb 13, 2001
Location
Twin Cities
Shortman (Jun 24, 2001 08:49 p.m.):
A friend suggested I just hot glue the fan to the case. Will this work decently? The thing I'm concerned about is vibration, but perhaps the hot glue will provide a cushion. The reason I ask is I don't have easy access to all the supplies to drill holes and put screws and washers in and stuff.

with Hot Glue, Ya' pays Ya' money, Ya' takes Ya' Chances. ;D
If you can get it to mushroom through case holes and the mounting holes in the fan, you might have a chance. Thoroughly degrease the surfaces where the glue will be applied. That helps a lot. Have an evacuation plan worked out, should the glue fail. :D

Hoot