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Engine Enamel or Gloss Protctive Enamel?

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radi4fun

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Location
San Deigo, CA
I went to my local Wall-Mart and picked up Rust-Oleum black automobile primer and the black gloss protective enamel. This was the only gloss black paint that they had. rest of the stuff was other colors or for plastics.

Then i went to Autozone and picked up Rust-Oleum black engine Enamel paint and clear Engine enamel paint as well.


Now i wanted to get a nice high gloss on my case inside and out... so i was wondering, has anybody used engine enamel or gloss protective enamel on their case? is there any difference between the two in the way they look? All i can tell is that one can sustain heat up to 500*F and the other can not, i doubt that my case will get any hotter than 70*C max as i'll be water cooling my CPU.

I also got some wetORdry sandpaper from Home Depot. All i could find was 320 Grit and 600 Grit, they ran out of 400 Grit. and they had nothing over 600 Grit :( i wanted some 800-1000 Grit but o well.

this are the steps that i was thinking of doing for painting the case. Can you guys tell me if i am going in the right direction, or give me some advice on how to do certain tings from personal experiences.

Step 1: i was thinking about lightly sanding my current side and top panel that probably is probably powder coated by thermaltake (it is a bit glossy) with 600 Grit paper... Also use the 600 Grit to lightly sand my removable MB trey that is bare aluminum. then apply the Automobile black primer over it. (should i instead use a 320 grit sand paper and sand it down to bare metal before applying the primer? or just a little bit of sanding should be fine with 600 Grit. i've never sanded before so i don't know what would work better for primer. They both seem very fine to me.

Step 2: Apply 2 light coats of the primer 3 minutes a part. Then once dry after 15-30 minutes, wet sand very lightly with 600 Grit sand paper.

Step 3: Then apply either Gloss Protective Enamel or Engine Enamel. I was thinking about doing about 3 coats of one of them. for the coat number 2 and 3, should i wait like 10-20 minutes or just reapply them within a few minutes after i am done with the first one? in the back both say apply second coat or clear coat within 1 hour or after 24hrs.

Step 4: For the clear coat, on the last step both of the paints in the back say apply the clear within 1 hour or after 24hrs... can the clear engine enamel count as clear gloss coat? i did not fine any clear gloss coats so the guy at the AutoZone said that if i use this clear engine enamel on top of either the black engine enamel, the clear one should work like a clear gloss coat, and if i use it with the Black Gloss Protective Enamel, then this Clear Engine Enamel will make the paint really nice deep and glossy. and once the clear engine enamel is done, should i go and try and fined some 1200 or 2000 Grit sand paper and wet send the panels, and the removable MB trey, or i should be fine?

What do you guys think? The primer i bought is right for the job? Witch of the two black Enamel should i choose, the Clear Protective Enamel or the Engine Enamel? and to top it all off, the clear engine enamel should be fine as a clear gloss protective coat right? or should i have gone with something else?

here is a picture of the four cans that i have bought. witch three to use?

1060830.jpg


any ideas, thoughts or advices will be greatly appreciated.
 

psionic98

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2009
1) primer is just the basecoat to hold the paint.. as long as the primer has something to grip onto it shouldn't be a problem.. just rough up any gloss/semigloss spots so its all dull.

2) not sure you need to sand down the primer.. read the label it will tell you that part.. I've never sanded primer unless it was glob of splatter or something..

3) again go with the label.. if it says within an hour do it within the hour.. usually you are just waiting for the paint to get tacky.. if its too wet the new paint will start to drip/run. too dry and you could get flaking.. id say a good 20-30mins apart should be fine.. just touch a spot of the paint where you wouldn't see it from outside (between mobo mounting points maybe) and if its tacky.. go for coat 2 and repeat

4) Engine enamel is rated for 500F which is 260C and your pc will NEVER hit that point for sure with even no cooling.. if the other paint can withstand 200+F then you will be more than fine, if not go for the engine enamel to be more than safe. As for clear coating.. the more you put on the deeper the look becomes(but you usually do some light sanding between with 1000+grit sandpaper for best results) Pick up some really high grit sandpaper at an autozone or autoparts store.. they should have it in the sections with epoxys or paints.
 

noxqzs

Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Location
Boston, MA
From my experience, I would wait longer than 30minutes before attempting to sand and reapply. It really does depend on the temp and humidity in your area, but a couple of hours would be better between coats. You know the term, haste makes waste.

If you are working with bare metal then, I would use 600grit and up. Autozone and stores where you buy auto parts should have 2000grit paper.
Start with primer, let that dry overnight, then begin painting. Lightly sand between coats, and then do a final wetsand on the clear coat, followed up with polish and buff.

Before you begin, do a test run on a small piece and perfect your technique. This will give you a good indicator of how tacky the paint is, when to sand it, and most importantly it will help minimize mistakes on the actual case. For your application, either paint would work fine. I would try both and see how they look when dry.
 
OP
R

radi4fun

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Location
San Deigo, CA
well for the temps it is pretty cold down here in san diego at this time of the year. it is around 57*F and about 74% humidity. so just for today then, i will try priming the MB trey and see what happens. I'll just sort of lightly sand the parts that i can with 600 Grit paper and then apply 2 coats of primer. 20-30 minutes apart. let it dry for the rest of the day and overnight and tomorrow i'll see if there are any big spots or globs, if not then just do a quick dry sand again with 600 grit and then apply the paint tomorrow :)

also on the clear coat part, that Clear Engine Enamel should be just fine right? do a couple of coats of that and i should get a nice deep gloss black right? and of course do light dry sanding with 2000 Grit paper between each coat of clear engine enamel? and after the final coat... after maybe 3 or 4 coats, once it is dry, wetsend the final coat. let that dry up and then polish it up? but the thing is i do not have any polishing or buffering equipment. don't want to go out there and buy a new drill and all to to polish the paint.

if i have already sanded two coats of clear engine enamel and on the final 3rd coat, once i am done applying it and let it dry, won't it be already be nice and dark glossy? no need to polish and buff?
 
OP
R

radi4fun

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Location
San Deigo, CA
here are some pics of the parts after 2 coats of primer left untouched overnight to dry. It looks very good in the sun. I'll take a few pics of the parts once the sun comes out again, its hiding in the clouds right now :( Then i'll start applying the paint :D this is so much fun, i did not think painting would be this fun lol :)

1060905.jpg


1060888.jpg
 

visbits

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
here are some pics of the parts after 2 coats of primer left untouched overnight to dry. It looks very good in the sun. I'll take a few pics of the parts once the sun comes out again, its hiding in the clouds right now :( Then i'll start applying the paint :D this is so much fun, i did not think painting would be this fun lol :)



1060888.jpg


DUDE, I hope that water heater is not GAS, judging by the supply line it is! If its gas it has a pilot light an those paint fumes are about 30x more flammable than propane! You need to spray outside, outside!

Just making sure you stay safe!
 
OP
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radi4fun

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Location
San Deigo, CA
ohhhh *****, is that so, WOW i'm an idiot then. But usually its a bit windy outside so i started spraying on the right side, about 20 ft away from the water heater. and for the most part i was spraying towards the garage door, so all the smell and the paint would go outside. and if i needed to paint the back side, i would just rotate the box on the tall chair and spray it outwards. well tomorrow, i'll definitely paint outside just incase.

for now here is an update, a few pics of the work i did this evening.

this is after i believe 3 coats of black enamel paint
1060909.jpg


This is after 2 coats of Clear Engine Enamel paint
1060913.jpg


1060945.jpg


1060963.jpg


106b0930.jpg


Is it turning out good guys? I want to do 1 more final clear coat, and for that, i will get some 2000 Grit paper, wet sand the current paint once it dries and then apply final coat.
 

noxqzs

Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Location
Boston, MA
That does look very nice.

To reference my earlier post. when I say polish and buff, I meant get yourself some meguiars polish, a nice rag, and use some good ol elbow grease. This helps bring out the shine in the clear coat. The only part I would do this too, is the exterior of the case or any large area section.

you gave me some motivation to continue some of my projects.