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FRONTPAGE EVGA GTX 1080 FTW HYBRID GAMING Review

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Overclockers.com

Member
Joined
Nov 1, 1998
These days, who doesn't like water cooled computer parts? It's a good thing too, EVGA's latest version of the flagship NVIDIA GTX 1080 has a built-in AIO cooler. Coming in with a hefty overclock and the FTW PCB, this should be a real contender on the performance side as well. What do you say we strap it to the bench and put the EVGA GTX 1080 FTW HYBRID GAMING through the paces?

Click here to view the article.
 

Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
Nice review Austin, that is one awesome card. That's strange about the stripped screws, I'm curious to hear what they have to say.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Nice review Austin, that is one awesome card. That's strange about the stripped screws, I'm curious to hear what they have to say.

It's a beast, no doubt there! I am as well, it was really a bummer to not be able to pull it apart and see the awesome VRM arrangement EVGA used.
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
Nice review Austin.

I'm glad that EVGA went with the FTW PCB for this hybrid.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Nice review Austin.

I'm glad that EVGA went with the FTW PCB for this hybrid.

I am as well. We all know these newer cards clock better the cooler they are and higher OC's demand cleaner power.
 

Robert17

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Well done Austin. I, obviously, enjoy the AIO cooling route & it's pleasing to see some of these cards coming out as kits. If/when EVGA responds regarding the stripped screws I'd be interested in seeing their response as well.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Well done Austin. I, obviously, enjoy the AIO cooling route & it's pleasing to see some of these cards coming out as kits. If/when EVGA responds regarding the stripped screws I'd be interested in seeing their response as well.

Thanks Robert. I'm hoping they respond with some sort of fix so I can tear it down, get pics, and post a lengthy update here!
 

Saul Goodman

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2016
Location
Adelaide
Great review but I don't see the attraction of these cards on an architecture that is locked down on voltage (and possibly wouldn't gain from more more anyway)

For example here in Australia a Gainward Phoenix that is basically silent on auto fan (1050rpm) is $900.

That sort of card is $1200 for pretty much exactly the same gaming results and no noise. 38C during testing is ridiculously good, but it also shows that the water cooling is not necessary.
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
These kinds of cards:

1. Allow you do direct the GPU exhaust heat where you want it (i.e. put the radiator where you want the heat to do)
2. Are great for SLI configurations (don't have to worry about choked off airflow)
3. Run much quieter than a traditional "blower" style cooler (which works best for SLI setups on air)
4. Keep the GPU cooler to allow for more overclocking potential.

Definitely a market for these.
 

Saul Goodman

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2016
Location
Adelaide
These kinds of cards:

1. Allow you do direct the GPU exhaust heat where you want it (i.e. put the radiator where you want the heat to do)
2. Are great for SLI configurations (don't have to worry about choked off airflow)
3. Run much quieter than a traditional "blower" style cooler (which works best for SLI setups on air)
4. Keep the GPU cooler to allow for more overclocking potential.

Definitely a market for these.

Good points although I dare say that the OC potential is debatable.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
So when people say they are stable at 2100mhz on an air cooled 1080 they are probably lying and it's throttling? Legit question.

No, not saying they're lying, but did you see the boost clock I was holding stable here?
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
For the new NVIDIA boost algorithm, every few degree core increase causes the frequency to drop. I don't remember the exact numbers.

But it boils down to the GPU silicon lottery in the end.

My 1080 FTW does 2100 MHz on air.

My Titan X P did about 1900 MHz on the stock air cooler at 82 C. I modded an EVGA 1080 hybrid cooler into the card, and now it does 2075 to 2100 MHz at about 50 C. When the temp is below 50 C it gets closer to 2100 MHz...when it's about 50 C it gets closer to 2075 MHz.


 

Jeff G

Member
Joined
May 22, 2016
For the new NVIDIA boost algorithm, every few degree core increase causes the frequency to drop. I don't remember the exact numbers.

But it boils down to the GPU silicon lottery in the end.

My 1080 FTW does 2100 MHz on air.

My Titan X P did about 1900 MHz on the stock air cooler at 82 C. I modded an EVGA 1080 hybrid cooler into the card, and now it does 2075 to 2100 MHz at about 50 C. When the temp is below 50 C it gets closer to 2100 MHz...when it's about 50 C it gets closer to 2075 MHz.

So I wonder what the next step is to modify that algorithm. If the card is stable to 80C, I wonder if you can get it to hold that 2100mhz at say 60C. I wish I knew more about the programming side of the card to tinker with stuff like that. It'd be nice to have the card running 2100mhz all the time if you could keep the temps decent.