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SOLVED first pc build, does not boot. Help!

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romanpro

Registered
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Hello. I just finished my first pc build and now facing problem. Pc wont boot up, thats what i think, all leds and fans turns on but monitor shows No signal. Maybe i did something wrong, i dont know. I added picture, maybe some1 can see problem there.

Display AOC G2460PG G-Sync
Video : Asus strix Nvidia 980 Ti

pc.jpg
 
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Evil-Mobo

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Location
MD
No should be on the mobo.

Did you build it outside the case first?

Can you post all specs please of the system?

Double check all connections and re-seat RAM and CPU to make sure all is fine.
 
OP
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romanpro

Registered
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
what that means? I did build it to case straight.

Video : Asus Strix GTX 980 Ti
Monitor:AOC G2460PG G-Sync
Mobo: MSI z170-g45
CPU: I5 - 6600K 3,5ghz, 6mb cache, LGA1151
PSU: Corsair cs650M
CPU cooler: cooler master Hyper 212 EVO
RAM : Hyperx savage 2x8gb DDR4
Case: Aerocool Xpredator
SDD samsung 500gb
HDD western digital 1tb
 
Last edited:

Evil-Mobo

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Location
MD
Did you put it together outside of the system first to make sure everything was working?
 

Evil-Mobo

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Location
MD
Re seat the ram and CPU and double check all of the connections on everything.

Good place to start.
 

kyfire

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Location
Hills of Kentucky
Try moving your GPU up to the top PCIe PCIe 3.0 x16/ x8 slot slot. The one you have it shown in your picture is ONLY a PCIe 3.0 x4/ x1 slot
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
It's always a good idea to build the system outside the case first for two reasons:

1. To make sure all the purchased components are good. If something is bad out of the box (and it does happen) then you haven't gone to all the trouble of mounting everything in the case and then have to take it all out.
2. To eliminate the possibility of a misplaced motherboard offset stud that causes an electrical "short" at the underside of the motherboard. Very common with inexperienced builders.

I would also remove the cooler and the CPU and check for bent socket pins.

Make sure the RAM and the video card are fully and properly seated and your motherboard power connectors as well. If that doesn't work then remove the video card and try the onboard video.

Make sure you have the correct power lead plugged into the P4 12v+ power block. It's the one in the upper rear corner of the motherboard and supplements the main 24 pin power lead from the PSU. Some folks make the mistake of plugging in one of the GPU power leads to that one. Especially in your situation where all the power leads from the PSU are the same color. On most PSUs the one I am talking about has yellow and black wires.
 
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romanpro

Registered
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
I find problem. Problem was with cpu. I do not know how it possible, but i did put cpu wrong way and all pins are broken. I feel so stupid right now. Did i burn motherboard also with it?
 

Joe88

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2013
The motherboard with broken and or bent pins is garbage now
It might have also fried the cpu, look for any black, burnt spots, if not only way would be to test it it another board
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
It's possible the CPU was also damaged but not necessarily. They're pretty tough actually. You won't know until you try it in a new motherboard. Pay close attention to the design of the socket and the CPU edges. You will see that the CPU has two little notches on opposite sides that correspond to two little pegs on the side of the socket frame. Those are "keys" to let you know how to place the CPU in the socket.

Having said all that don't beat up on yourself too bad. Most of us experienced builders have borked an Intel socket by bending pins at one time or another. It's not that hard to do and points to the need to be very careful as those pins are very fragile. If only a few are bent then sometimes . . . sometimes you can straighten them successfully. But often you cannot. They are nested in such a way as to make repair difficult. Much easier on an AMD setup.