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First Time Water Cooling For Xeon E5 / Supermicro

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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
Hi!

I am new to the forum. I am also new to water cooling and I'm interested in getting advice on a new system I am planning to build. The purpose of the system is to give a friend a reasonable video editing workstation. The person also likes to work with very large Microsoft Excel workbooks.

The system I am thinking of is:

Intel Xeon E5-2630 V4 processor, LGA 2011-3 (2.2 Ghz, 10 cores). Optionally might go for an E5-2640 V4 which bumps the speed to 2.4 Ghz.

EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 SC video card

Supermicro X10SRA motherboard

Fractal Design Define R5 case

I want to liquid cool this new system but I'm not sure how to find a good cooling system. I've looked on Newegg.com at the liquid cooling systems offered by Corsair. Some reviewers say the pumps failed on their Corsair coolers, for example the H115i. This bothers me a lot, I'm not sure if it is a good option here. I've looked at the Koolance website, but there is such a variety of parts available, that I don't know what to get.

I have read your "Beginner's Guide", which seems to be from a few years ago, and I've watched the videos posted to the XSPC website. I notice on FrozenCPU.com that there are some possible XSPC kits.

I understood from reading that I need at least a CPU water block, a pump, a reservoir, a radiator, and coolant. Plus tubing and fittings to connect tubing to the water blocks.

My goal: first liquid cool the Xeon processor.

Then liquid cool the video card.

I'm not into overclocking but I do want my friend to have good performance.

I have built more than a few air cooled computers before, so I feel confident in general. The person I am building this system for is using an air cooled system that I built 5 years ago. The new system will be built out by me too, and I could be comfortable with adding cooling-related parts.

Any suggestions for cooling system for this?

Thanks a ton

Bob

 
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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017

Here is the cooling loop I am thinking of using. Just one 360 radiator, with a reservoir, to cool both the GPU and the CPU. Is this a practical loop?

liquid_cooling_loop_xeon_v1_small.jpg
 

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
that is the loop order we like.

if you look at petg or any hard tube, get all the pieces of one brand.
I prefer soft tube with compression fittings, it's less likely to get shaken loose when moving the rig around for me and I also have mine apart often.
put together a parts list, post it in this thread, with links and the big dog water coolers will chime in, everybody's out enjoying summer so it might take a while to get them all on board.
 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
:welcome: to OCFs.

First, I want to make sure we're clear that you're worried about a seal loops pump (AIO) but willing to go a bit more riskier with a open loop? Both are risks but if done right, there's no issues. For one, any pump can go bad but in all likeliness, you shouldn't have an issue with a AIO. Because this is a workstation, I would recommend going with a AIO and not have to worry about possibly leaks in a more complex open loop or as we call it, custom water cooling. Sure it can happen with either or but the job is much easier and again, less complex than water cooling. If you're locked on going with custom water cooling, well you've come to the right place.

Best thing to do is look up at other Fractal Ddfine R5 cases to see what other's have done in the custom water cooling aspect of things. That can give you an idea what fits and what doesn't to get a good start on this project.
 
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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
:welcome: to OCFs.

First, I want to make sure we're clear that you're worried about a seal loops pump (AIO) but willing to go a bit more riskier with a open loop? Both are risks but if done right, there's no issues. For one, any pump can go bad but in all likeliness, you shouldn't have an issue with a AIO. Because this is a workstation, I would recommend going with a AIO and not have to worry about possibly leaks in a more complex open loop or as we call it, custom water cooling. Sure it can happen with either or but the job is much easier and again, less complex than water cooling. If you're locked on going with custom water cooling, well you've come to the right place.

Best thing to do is look up at other Fractal Ddfine R5 cases to see what other's have done in the custom water cooling aspect of things. That can give you an idea what fits and what doesn't to get a good start on this project.

Hi GTXJackBauer!

I think you are right, I am probably better off with an AIO. I've gone into this thinking it would be fun and easy to piece together a "custom" system. There is more challenge here than I've expected. I've spent most of today looking at the FrozenCPU.com website trying to piece together a possible system. I'm finding it very difficult going because of the variety of different parts and fittings. I'm never sure if I have the right fitting types and sizes, or how to determine if a given reservoir and pump are compatible, and just how the heck am I going to fit a 360 sized radiator on the Fractal case. My ignorance and innocence is hitting me. I'm pretty shocked by the prices for parts on FrozenCPU, and they seem to be out of stock on a lot of fittings, radiators, and reservoirs.

For me, the current project is a business one. I need to get a new system built for my friend.

I'm now thinking I had better simplify this and go the AIO rather than custom route. Either the Corsair H115i or the Fractal Designs S24.

I will keep my eye on these forums and follow the liquid cooling trends -- perhaps some day I'll do a custom build for just myself. I have gone through some of the threads here with great interest, including the one by "exisss" -- I'm very interested in the photos he posted, I tried to figure out what exact fittings he used and what parts he ultimately decided on.

Thanks so much for helping me see that an AIO is probably a more time-efficient solution for my project.

Thanks a ton

Bob

 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
Most of us shop at PerformancePCS for custom cooling parts since Frozencpu fell off the radar a bit.

Some companies to look for when it comes to AIOs is Corsair and NZXT. If you want some "bling", go with NZXT's new AIO coolers that have RGB. That's if it has a window to see the internals and the client is interested.

Also, make sure to go with a 120.2/140.2 AIO for both CPU and GPU. NZXT has a AIO GPU bracket that can be used on a GPU to be able to install a AIO while having a fan to cool the rest of PCB is another idea for GPU cooling.
 

||Console||

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2004
I vote Aio as well . You your self are not used to a open loop let alone you're friend. Who is going to do the maintenance on the loop every 6 months?

Go Aio they have gotten alot better over the years .
Or get one like eks that can be expanded on.
 
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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
A big thanks to both of you, GTXJackBauer and ||Console||. I'm looking on the PerformancePCs website -- at the NZXT Kraken X61 and I will check out the EKS, too.

I agree that "open loop" will be too great a challenge at this time.

Thanks a ton

Bob
 
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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
I spent a while looking at the EKWB website and quickly focused on the EK-P280 kit. This really resonates with me. I think this is exactly what I was hoping to find way in the back of my mind when I started thinking in terms of liquid cooling: a pre-packaged kit with all components included which allows someone to see the coolant. I downloaded the installation manual and studied it. I'm very impressed, it is clear and well written. I also have my eye on the EK-P360 kit. I am guessing that with that kit, I can start with liquid cooling the processor, and if the noise levels turn out to be okay, move on to cooling the GPU at a later date without needing to add a second radiator. I'm okay about doing maintenance every few months such as cleaning of the radiator. I will ask the friend to suggest a coolant color and buy some coloring drops for it.

Thank you for the suggestions!

Bob
 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
EK, Swiftech and the likes are all open loop pre-built kits. Stick with the sealed AIOs from Corsair, NZXT and the likes.

Also, just grab your AIOs from newegg or the manufacturer's site.
 
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BobCochran

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Jun 9, 2017
Hi GTXJackBauer, thanks for getting back to me. After experiencing my initial wave of enthusiasm for EKWB, I did look at the considerable cost increase vs. even an H115i from Corsair, and ask myself if that is worth it. I would have to get approval from the friend for that amount of money. I have a wish list set up on my Newegg account, and I'll add in something from NZXT or Corsair and see which way the strictly-business-practical vs. personal temptations tug me. I want to keep my good record with the customer, so...

Thanks a ton

Bob
 
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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
It was decided to just go with a Corsair H115i. I have to admit that customized liquid cooling is very addictive for me. Perhaps with my next system...who knows. It is a very expensive hobby indeed. With that, seeing the work that you folks have done has given me a lot of wow! moments.

Thanks for taking the time to help a newbie. I really appreciate it.

Bob
 

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
it can get a little pricey at times, I just ordered some fittings I decided to change out, there goes another $100 bill, CHA, CHING!!!!!
 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
If I wanted to change all 9 rad fans, it would cost me $200-$300. Another $100-$200 in fittings.

I believe $750-$2000, anyone's dream loop can be build.
 
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BobCochran

Registered
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
I want to express my thanks for the advice received. Here is a photo of my system with a Corsair H115i installed. Everything is really quiet which is a big plus. The CPU temperatures reported by lm_sensors on Linux are around 35-38 degrees Centigrade. That is not too bad I hope. I'm really sold on the liquid cooling.

I can imagine that all eyes are on that small, el cheapo video card. Well yes it is definitely el cheapo at under $30. The video card will be the subject of a separate post, possibly later today.

Thanks for all the great advice!

first_boot_new_computer_small.jpg


 

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Close to the San Andreas Fault
Welcome to the forums, very nice system you put together. This thread caught my eye, as I have a Supermicro X9DRD-7LN4F with x2 E5 2670s that I'd like to keep a little cooler than the stock narrow heatsinks can provide. Your lm-sensor readings of 35-38C look quite reasonable, my temps are abt 45C. Now I'm thinking of doing a WC setup. ;)
 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
The only thing I would do is either position that rad up top or add the fans in push configuration so you're not stressing out that tubing. Overall it looks great.