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fsck freakout

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Christoph

JAPH Senior
Joined
Oct 8, 2001
Location
Redmond, WA
[background]
I'm playing around with the Gentoo kernel, trying to get my Zaurus to talk to my computer without using my CF ethernet card. (I want to put stuff on a CF memory card, and can't with the ethernet card in the way. I could do it indirectly, but I'll learn more this way.)
Anyway, I'm using the Gentoo r2 kernel with my Debian installation because I the defauly 2.4.20 kernel doesn't have the options I need, and I haven't had the time to customize my Gentoo installation enough yet.
[/background]

The problem is that when I try to boot with the Gentoo kernel, I get an error from fsck that /dev/hdb4 (my root) doesn't contain a valid superblock. The partition seems to mount fine readonly, and when I boot from the 2.4.20 kernel, everything's OK. I've compared the kernel configs, and they both support ext2 and ext3 support.
 

moorcito

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2002
Location
Chicago, IL
The only time I've seen that error was when I didn't have the filesystem support in the kernel, but if the configs are the same then something weird is going on. Which filesystem are you using for /dev/hdb4? What version is the gentoo kernel?
 
OP
Christoph

Christoph

JAPH Senior
Joined
Oct 8, 2001
Location
Redmond, WA
I'm using ext3 for /dev/hdb4, and the error is that there isn't fsck can't find a valid ext2 partition on that device. I'll try another recompile to see if that clears anything up.

Edit: BTW, I compiled the kernel in a chroot'd environment (Debian chroot'd to my Gentoo root partition). IDK why that would cause any problems, but it might be relevant.
 
Last edited:
OP
Christoph

Christoph

JAPH Senior
Joined
Oct 8, 2001
Location
Redmond, WA
I'm so smart. I forgot to edit /etc/fstab. Gentoo wasn't smart enough to find /dev/BOOT, /dev/ROOT and /dev/SWAP.
 

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Christoph, you're not alone. Once I etc-update'd in Gentoo, and being in a lazy mood, I just had it automatically update all the files, thinking they were things of little consequence. However, I discovered upon my next reboot that the fstab, my make.conf, and assorted other things had been overwritten.

I'm always been very careful with etc-update since :)
 
OP
Christoph

Christoph

JAPH Senior
Joined
Oct 8, 2001
Location
Redmond, WA
chmod 444 $(cat important_config_files):D

Now that I think of it, what you did is probably what happened to me and why I can remember successfully booting before my update.