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FSP Water cooled PSU

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caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
I think zalman even made hard drive blocks.
I might buy one of the psu's, just because.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
I've seen that some time ago and I think it's totally stupid idea. There are 90+ Platinum/Titanium PSU which can handle 600W+ and fans are not even spinning. I have 1200W PCP&C PSU which has 5 years and is not even spinning fan up to 600W load. I have 450W Corsair SFX PSU which is not spinning fan up to about 300W. I just see no reason why someone requires to use water cooling in PSU. It's better to buy higher efficiency unit than waste money on water cooling for PSU.
 
OP
Lochekey

Lochekey

Senior Pink Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2015
Ok so my initial reaction of, who was smoking what when they thought this up, is not that far out of line. As I initially said I see no real market for this but figured I would ask the question.
 

Dolk

I once overclocked an Intel
Joined
Mar 3, 2008
I would have liked to be in the room when the engineers heard the pitch from marketing. hA!
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
I've seen that some time ago and I think it's totally stupid idea. There are 90+ Platinum/Titanium PSU which can handle 600W+ and fans are not even spinning. I have 1200W PCP&C PSU which has 5 years and is not even spinning fan up to 600W load. I have 450W Corsair SFX PSU which is not spinning fan up to about 300W. I just see no reason why someone requires to use water cooling in PSU. It's better to buy higher efficiency unit than waste money on water cooling for PSU.

This is a very valid point. Hell I can't remember if I ever even saw the fan in my PSU spinning. With my limited knowledge of liquid cooling, the thing is moot when taking into account the added impedence in a loop (and added cost, whatever that may be) to liquid cool a power supply, as it's obvious a good supply doesn't put off that much heat to begin with.