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FX-6300 OC

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Cosharek

New Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
So i got the EVO 212 and i decided to oc my FX-6300, im getting a 6600k in 2 months so i might as well just push my FX to the maximum.

I managed to get 4.5 ghz at 1.365v and my max temps while running prime95 are 52*C and idle 27*C, i get my temps using CoreTemp

Is this normal, and should i try to push it more

CoreTemp.PNG
 

Silver_Pharaoh

Likes the big ones n00b Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
That looks like a good chip to me! beats the sh*t out of my 6300. 4.6Ghz needs 1.6v. :bang head
I'd try 4.6Ghz but you are quickly running out of thermal headroom. 62C max please :)
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
You probably have more headroom to overclock because you are using pretty low vcore for 4.5ghz. But you are about out of cooling room. How long did you stress test with Prime95?
 
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Cosharek

New Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
i went straight to 4ghz, i then did 30min for every 100mhz i increased and once i was satisfied with the OC at 4.5ghz i did 5hrs also the VCORE in coretemp is wrong, in the bios i have it set to 1.365

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yeah only if i was using that board lels
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
i went straight to 4ghz, i then did 30min for every 100mhz i increased and once i was satisfied with the OC at 4.5ghz i did 5hrs also the VCORE in coretemp is wrong, in the bios i have it set to 1.365

- - - Updated - - -

yeah only if i was using that board lels

The vcore will not show in any monitoring program the same as what it is set to in bios. There is vdrop (voltage drop at idle) and vdroop (voltage drop under load). The monitoring programs may only show the net vcore after vdrop/vdroop. This is physics. Electricity flowing through circuits encounters resistance. As the circuits heat up under load the resistance increases and the voltage drops even more. Having said that, many or most motherboards try to offset that drop with a feature called LLC (Load Line Calibration). In lower end boards the LLC is automatic and built in. In higher end boards it is a setting in bios that is adjustable.
 
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Cosharek

New Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
The vcore will not show in any monitoring program the same as what it is set to in bios. There is vdrop (voltage drop at idle) and vdroop (voltage drop under load). The monitoring programs may only show the net vcore after vdrop/vdroop. This is physics. Electricity flowing through circuits encounters resistance. As the circuits heat up under load the resistance increases and the voltage drops even more. Having said that, many or most motherboards try to offset that drop with a feature called LLC (Load Line Calibration). In lower end boards the LLC is automatic and built in. In higher end boards it is a setting in bios that is adjustable.

nice to know :>
 

Ozz1

Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2016
so then as ive been trying to say from the inset is, and im not trying to be rude or anything, 3rd parties can read all sorts of readings and can make you panic, you see it and go , **** whats goin on now, it was this b4 etc, and heres an example, cpuz, how many have had issues with cpuz readings ?? for not being correct, especially with voltage readings, i cant see ahow a 3rd party can read the same with all the different inferences involved as a bios canm i i honestly dont think that 3rd parties have the same access to all the bios settings to make this possible to 3rd party software, i take them as like a guide (thats all), i could be speakin out of me arse here but until i see a 3rd party that matches bios , ill beleive bios anyday

beleive your bios :thup:
 
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