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Gemini waterblock?

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Vash

Registered
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Location
Canada, eh?
Hey all, I know there probably is a thread about "Hoot's" roundup of those 4 waterblocks, so could someone link me to it so I can post questions there?

If there isn't a thread already about that, I was just wondering, hoots, how do you adjust the tension on those gemini waterblocks? the swiftech and dangerden use springloaded screws I believe, but I didn't see anything like that on the gemini waterblocks....ooh, and how do you take those motherboard mounting "beads" or things, whatever you call them, out? Once they snap in, it looks pretty permanent...

I was just wondering because they look like nice little minimalist waterblocks, and cheaper/lighter than the monster swiftech-style "1 pound of copper, add water" method.
 

The Overclocker

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2001
Location
Milton Keynes, UK
i do not think there is another thread yet, but they will be poping up soon i am sure,

looking at the pictures i think the tension is adjusted by tightening the nuts at the top, there are no springs involved and the rubber washer may take some of the pressure

The motherboard clips are taken out just like the clips on your graphics card or motherboard, when the are squezed they will be relesed because they will fit though the hole.
 

Diggrr

Underwater Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
You can see the Gemini waterblock here
I've liked it from the time I first saw it, that was when I was under the impression that all blocks were pretty much the same.
Now I know better....Thanks Hoot!
 

Highlander944

Registered
Joined
Jan 31, 2002
Gemini Cool hold-down

Hey all, this is Peter from Gemini Cool.

1) The idea for this block DID NOT COME from that [email protected] block. I never saw that block before designing mine. Once I published my 1st pictures, I was contacted by fixit. My block is much different from the physic standpoint.

2) The hold down:
Well my goal was to design a hold down that did not require the motherboard to be removed in order to install. That is the reason for the standoffs. Once in place, they can only be removed by taking the mother board out or cutting them (they are nylon).

I started using curved washers to supply the recommended down force. I found that the washers did not help 'lock' the screw in place. I also found that the nylon standoffs would 'stretch' once the proper pressure was applied. So the design evolved into what you saw posted in hoot's review.

The o-rings act as 'locks' to help keep the screw from coming loose during transport to that LAN party. The o-rings also compress to help keep the block flat on the core. The nylon stretches to indicate the proper tension has been applied.

I include LONG nylon screws with nuts and washers for those who do not like the clip-ins. The long screws can be trimmed with a pair of scissors if you desire to use the standoffs.

I hope this clears up any questions....

Peter.
 

mx-6*

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2001
Location
Tokyo, Japan
Re: Gemini Cool hold-down

Highlander944 said:
Hey all, this is Peter from Gemini Cool.

1) The idea for this block DID NOT COME from that [email protected] block. I never saw that block before designing mine. Once I published my 1st pictures, I was contacted by fixit. My block is much different from the physic standpoint.


Whats different about it?

From the pictures I've seen of both, they look like exactly the same design. One just uses more copper than the other. But the design itself couldnt be more alike.

3cooper1.jpg


cpu_cooler.jpg
 

BillA

choke man
Joined
Jan 2, 2001
mx-6*

the spiral configuration is not unique, there are several European variants,
and a number of handmade wbs were made here before Fixitt's

the Gemini is different
look at the channel's length, and aspect ratio (heigth to width)
I suspect the surface finish also
probably several other things if a close comparison were to be made

and the Gemini is better executed
Lexan (polycarbonate) is FAR superior to Plexiglass (acrylic), higher strength and less prone to stress cracking

recall the cracking tops ?

be cool
 

Highlander944

Registered
Joined
Jan 31, 2002
Hey man, if your gonna start slapping me in the face with insults, at least you could rip a picture in which I used the clear adhesive sealant to secure the top cover. (which is how all the new models are assembled and shipped) :p

Thanks Billa... I'm glad some of the differences were apparent to someone who is obviously intelligent. :)

I said it above and I'll say it again. Weather you want to believe it or not, I copied nothing. If your ready for bed, I'll start posting my step by step design process and why I did everything I did.... It's all pretty dry and it WILL put u to sleep.
 

BillA

choke man
Joined
Jan 2, 2001
no, polycarbonate is a very good material for this application
- makes rock-proof windows too

be cool
 

KingB

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2002
Location
Calgary, Alberta
BillA said:
no, polycarbonate is a very good material for this application
- makes rock-proof windows too

be cool

Cool

Hey Highlander944,

Very impressed with the block. If Hoot says its good, then it must be good. He seems to have a way of testing and explainging things so I easily understand. Who wants a pound of copper hanging off their CPU anyway. Looks like transporting to the Lan parties is a little more reliable this way.

Just ordered one from case-mod.com 10 minutes ago.

Now I am already thinking vid card and northbridge cooling.
 

BillA

choke man
Joined
Jan 2, 2001
Highlander944

"adhesive sealant to secure the top cover" ?

what long-term testing have you done re the adhesive ?
the standard is cyclic stress-regression testing (constant pressure and temp cycling)

I ask because the thermally induced shear stresses could be high
AND this will occur in the presence of water

short term does not equal long term (under these conditions)

be cool
 

Highlander944

Registered
Joined
Jan 31, 2002
BillA - Well, I've only had this system up and running since the end of October. No leaks in that short time. I am actually relying on a company rep to advise me on the proper sealant.

The key to my sealant is in the cure. The cure must be neutral, i.e. no acid given off during the cure process. acid will attack the copper and cause ugly discoloration. If someone removes the top, they may get lucky and be able to secure it once again without it leaking, or they could simply purchase some neutral cure adhesive from a local store.
 

BillA

choke man
Joined
Jan 2, 2001
you might want to dig into it a bit with your rep

shear stress + hydrolysis + temp cycling = potential problems

be cool
 
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