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Going for 6700k @ 5GHZ 24/7 bad idea?

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Makentox

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Jan 27, 2017
So i got my 6700k delidded and overclocked to 4.9GHZ @ 1.430v in Bios where HWmonitor shows 1.412 due to LLC. So far it was like this for 2 weeks with no single crash during gaming. This voltage is pretty high and if i push it even more higher to achieve 5GHZ i need to think twice. I understand that extra 100 MHZ wont give me much of performance boost, but atm its all about the number.
So i would like to know if anybody here at this forum run this chip at 5GHZ for 24/7? So how big the risk of destroying CPU at 1.470 vcore or so if temperature wont exceed 85C during gaming?
 
Last edited:

R_Pierce

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Feb 4, 2017
Location
Marion, IA
The common logic seems to be no more than 1.40/1.41 volts for 24/7 use. If you want to push it for benchmarks, have at it, just dont go over 1.50 volts. But I wouldnt use over 1.4 for 24/7 and expect any kind of longevity.
 
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Makentox

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Jan 27, 2017
I couldnt find many posts on the internet that their cpu has died due to overvoltage, so if there is a chance like 1/10000 why not to risk.
Well i would like to last it around 2 years, skylake is great compared to older gens, also i pretty much won silicon lottery, not many can run it stable at 1.412.
KL is just a "facelift" for SL not worth saving for it, performance is pretty much the same.
Well hopefully i will be able to lower voltage even more after my CLU arive. Temperature does help to lower voltage.

Does anyone know if there any tricks in bios that will help to increase stability at the same or lower voltage?
 

R_Pierce

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Marion, IA
I couldnt find many posts on the internet that their cpu has died due to overvoltage, so if there is a chance like 1/10000 why not to risk.
Well i would like to last it around 2 years, skylake is great compared to older gens, also i pretty much won silicon lottery, not many can run it stable at 1.412.
KL is just a "facelift" for SL not worth saving for it, performance is pretty much the same.
Well hopefully i will be able to lower voltage even more after my CLU arive. Temperature does help to lower voltage.

Does anyone know if there any tricks in bios that will help to increase stability at the same or lower voltage?

Here is an exert explaining why the voltage effects longevity.

"It's both. High heat and high voltage speeds up the process of electron migration, the process where connections slowly lose their capacity to conduct electricity. But ultimately, it is the voltage. Resistance to the electrical flow is what creates the heat. You can put a CPU in a 80C oven for 20 years and it would still work. However, run it for 20 years and the probability will have it fail. However, heat is also a very important factor. It exponentially accelerates electromigration."

An then a bit better explanation:

Electromigration, which is dependent on current (which is directly dependent on clock speed), voltage, and temperature. Reduce one and you can increase the others without increasing rate of electromigration.

Regarding temperature, a rough rule of thumb is that every 10C increase halves the lifespan of the part.

Strictly speaking, it's not the silicon that's damaged. It's the metals in the various traces, interconnects, and gates being knocked out of place. This either causes shorts as metals penetrate into insulators, or it increases the resistance where metal has been displaced, leading to more heat and more rapid migration, until the circuit fails entirely.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromigration

http://www.csl.mete.metu.edu.tr/Electromigration/emig.htm

Eventually, electromigration will kill pretty much every chip, if some other physical failure doesn't get it first.
 
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Makentox

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Jan 27, 2017
Eventually, electromigration will kill pretty much every chip, if some other physical failure doesn't get it first.

So do you think that my cpu less likely to survive 2 years around 1.470v? Its much compared to 1.250v but not as much compared to 1.392v , so do you think 0.080v difference will kill it times faster?
 

R_Pierce

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Feb 4, 2017
Location
Marion, IA
So do you think that my cpu less likely to survive 2 years around 1.470v? Its much compared to 1.250v but not as much compared to 1.392v , so do you think 0.080v difference will kill it times faster?

I honestly cant say. That is just some information I found from some very respected members on another forum when I was searching for the same thing. Some of the guys here will chime in today Im sure. From my experience (of which I have gotten from following a select few's advise here) is that 1.40/1.41 is considered safe for daily (24/7) use. So I have just always stuck with that number.

But, I can say that .08 volts is quite a bit in this architecture. Look how much more heat is created from just a .1 volt increase when everything else is left the same. We are talking a very small voltage as a whole here, so it doesnt take much to jump 10% in voltage.
 

EarthDog

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Dec 15, 2008
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Buckeyes!
So do you think that my cpu less likely to survive 2 years around 1.470v? Its much compared to 1.250v but not as much compared to 1.392v , so do you think 0.080v difference will kill it times faster?
Of course there is higher risk with higher vtage amd temps. When it could die, nobody knows.This is the risk you take in overclocking. I wouldn't go more for 24/7...but that is just me.
 

Bluefalcon13

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Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
I thought electron migration also effects semiconductors? I.E. P type silicon adjacent to n type silicon perminately becomes closer to pure silicon as electrons migrate across the p-n boundary. This would reduce the on off effect the gate has and at the same time, reduce the conductivity of the n region as the n type loses some free electron.

@Dolk I need an adult!
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I couldnt find many posts on the internet that their cpu has died due to overvoltage, so if there is a chance like 1/10000 why not to risk.
Well i would like to last it around 2 years, skylake is great compared to older gens, also i pretty much won silicon lottery, not many can run it stable at 1.412.
KL is just a "facelift" for SL not worth saving for it, performance is pretty much the same.
Well hopefully i will be able to lower voltage even more after my CLU arive. Temperature does help to lower voltage.

Does anyone know if there any tricks in bios that will help to increase stability at the same or lower voltage?

Essentially, yes. More like a refinement and they typically overclock about .2 ghz higher than Sky.
 

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
I thought electron migration also effects semiconductors? I.E. P type silicon adjacent to n type silicon perminately becomes closer to pure silicon as electrons migrate across the p-n boundary. This would reduce the on off effect the gate has and at the same time, reduce the conductivity of the n region as the n type loses some free electron.

@Dolk I need an adult!

Yay quoting myself! So electron migration does indeed effect the n and p type semi-conductor materials within a transistor. Additionally, it can cause the insulator which separates the gate of a MOSFET to become conductive. Without diving rather deep into MOSFET theory, it is bad. Checked with a guy I work with (he has a PHD in EE, and at one point worked at Intel as a process design engineer, so should be considered a fairly good source of info!). Ultimately, Voltage and current can do bad things to semiconductors, and overclocking (increasing frequency) increases current draw within the transistors themselves, and they can be affected. Additionally voltage increases can do damage the semiconductors themselves as well. Therefore, overdoing an overclock does very bad things to the transistors :)
 

Lochekey

Senior Pink Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2015
The other thing that can happen that is not as widely talked about is degradation of the chip due to excessive voltage/heat. I am not talking all out failure here but instead the ability of the chip to run at a certain speed/voltage combination. I would surmise that running that voltage/heat combination will lead your chip to an accelerated degradation that will result in you having to either raise your voltage further over time or drop the speed at the same voltage to keep your system stable.
 

DefiantReaper

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Aug 6, 2015
Location
Indiana
The other thing that can happen that is not as widely talked about is degradation of the chip due to excessive voltage/heat. I am not talking all out failure here but instead the ability of the chip to run at a certain speed/voltage combination. I would surmise that running that voltage/heat combination will lead your chip to an accelerated degradation that will result in you having to either raise your voltage further over time or drop the speed at the same voltage to keep your system stable.

Exactly. Nailed it there.

I personally wont go past 1.4vcore on my 6700k with a huge waterloop in my system and thats because i fear it degrading itself requiring more vcore like my 9590 did fairly quickly at 5GHz....
 

Alaric

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Dec 4, 2011
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Satan's Colon, US
The i7 6700k has a maximum Core voltage of 1.5v listed in the Intel documents. LINK: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us...esktop-s-processor-lines-datasheet-vol-1.html

Do they have any stats on the MTBF at that voltage? Just wondering cause that info will tell us 'is it safe for a few moments, or safe for long term'

^This. If I can go higher than 4600 MHz without killing my chip I'm interested. Right now I'm set at 1.40v (1.380 in HWM). I wouldn't mind 4700 or 4800 MHz, but I don't really want to toss my CPU next year.
 

DefiantReaper

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Aug 6, 2015
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Indiana
^This. If I can go higher than 4600 MHz without killing my chip I'm interested. Right now I'm set at 1.40v (1.380 in HWM). I wouldn't mind 4700 or 4800 MHz, but I don't really want to toss my CPU next year.

I have always thought 1.4 was safe with a 6700k. i think the biggest increase on increasing the vcore was going from 4.6-4.7GHz.