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goop heat resistance

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AndrusLRoc

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Location
Kernersville, NC
I got a new waterblock in the works right now, I usually solder blocks together, but I wanna try goop on this one cuz it has 3 layers, and that can be difficult to solder properly. What I wanna know is, if I goop this block together, will I be able to go over the edges with my angle grinder w/ sanding disk to finish the edges nicely without the goop melting? Cuz it gets pretty hot while grinding the edges. Anyone have an experience with this? Thanks! :D

-Andy
 

ZachM

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2003
I've never used Goop, but I know JB Weld is grindable. Have you sworn against JB Weld?
 

cack01

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2002
Location
San diego or UC Davis
I have seen both plumbers goop and JB weld melt under extreme heat. If you take it slow, I do not think you will have a problem. Just do not get the RPMS to high, or have someone spay water while you are grinding.

Also I noticed that once JB weld melted and cooled, it lost any bond it had on the material and became very brittle. I was able to snap thick pieces of it with my fingers.

I personally would solder unless you have no chioce.
 
OP
A

AndrusLRoc

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Location
Kernersville, NC
Never been a big fan of JB weld, I may *try* to solder it still. I was thinkin about using the goop as the only means of holding together/ sealing, but now I'm thinking against that. I've made 10 or so waterblocks all soldered, just wanted to try something different. Oh well, time to go clean some copper. :D
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
Good.
Goop wouldn't have worked too well.

What kind of solder do you use and how do you heat the parts?

I have gotten excellent results soldering multiple parts at once using TIX solder ( very low melting point, relatively high strength) and my kitchen oven.
You must fixture the parts so they can't move and add some weight to the top of the sandwich to press it together as the solder flows, but that's how I would approach your problem.
 
OP
A

AndrusLRoc

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Location
Kernersville, NC
I don't like to wait for the oven, have done it that way, the last few blocks i've made, I used a torch and sterling solder. Works well, just have to get it good and hot. I guess that's what I'm gonna do with this block. I solder my barbs in too, I'm thinking I'm gonna have to solder the barbs in the lid first then solder the layers together. Then a lil goop around the center barb to seal it up. I'll post some pics whenever I get it done.

-Andy