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Has any one tryed making their own heat sink

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Roachvan

Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2001
I was thinking about trying ot make one with an alloy we use at work.
I figured if it can cool plastic from 500 F to 80 F in 14 seconds with 50 F water going through it.
Then it might be good air cooled or with room temp water.
What do you think?
 

AzzKickerG1

Registered
Joined
Apr 5, 2001
if you have an unlimited supply I dont see why not. Just experiment. Look at some designes from some manuf. and see what you can come up with. Who Knows. maybe you can make a business. :-D and give us all discounts. hahah. maybe you can make a heat sink that allows water to flow through it.
 
OP
R

Roachvan

Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2001
I was thinking along the same lines. But a block about the size of an Alpha P3125 would be about 200.00.
I would only get one shot to do it right.
 

Hoot

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Feb 13, 2001
Location
Twin Cities
Cusil is what you want. An amalgam of copper and silver. Don't ask me why, but it has better thermal conductivity than either copper or silver.

Hoot
 
OP
R

Roachvan

Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2001
cold mop has it right.
Ampco is better than copper and silver.
But its softer than Brass and almost as heavy.
I think it might be good for air cooling and insane with water.
I just can't get over the 200 Dollar price. And I don't know how to make a heatsink out of it.
It would be cool if I could find a place to make it for me.
 

0dan0

Registered
Joined
Apr 8, 2001
I would just make a waterblock out of it. They are much smaller than heatsinks and heat transfer is very important. I would spend a little extra to get a waterblock made out of stuff with a higher heat exchange than copper (and silver). Im sure that would be a few degrees lower than a copper waterblock.

-Dan
 
OP
R

Roachvan

Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2001
I found some info on it and the site said they can make what you want.

Conductivity Alloys - Ampco 940 and Ampco MoldMATE™ 90
Ampco conductivity alloys are designed specifically to improve cooling efficiencies and reduce cycle times of plastic molding operations. The efficient heat removal of Ampco conductivity alloys also reduces post-mold warpage and shrinkage, and results in improved dimensional stability. Ampco conductivity alloys offer corrosion resistance comparable to stainless steel, and are beryllium-free.

Ampco 940 - A high performance, high thermal conductivity copper alloy for the injection and blow molding industries. Helps compensate for uneven wall thickness or part configuration. Offers better heat dissipation in areas of heavy wall sections or limited water channel access.

Ampco MoldMATE™ 90 - Ampco's newest alloy, Ampco MoldMATE™ 90, provides optimal thermal conductivity, tensile strength and hardness for plastic molds, tooling and processing applications.

Look for technical data and a listing of distributors for these problem-solving conductivity alloys on our News page:
www.ampcometal.com/news.html
 

coldmop

Registered
Joined
Mar 4, 2001
Roachvan you won't believe this but I actually had a guy machine me a AMPCO90 waterblock about 2"x3"x1" thin wall (5mm)box. I took the block into him and it was already flycut square. He said no problem should only take about an hour. Went to see him and it was beautiful, 1/4 npt elbows on one end, nice flat lid. Then he drops the bomb. Said it took him all day "...but he would only charge me about 4 hours,$250+ tax." I almost shat but had to walk, and therefore lost my beautiful Ampco. What happened was when he tried to slice off the lid he used a cutter in the mill that looks like a circular saw blade. Well when Ampco gets warm it gets very gummy and he ended up breaking the blade. Obviously he was trying to recover the cost of the tool. Lucky he didn't get in an accident on the way to work. Would have had to pay his increased insurance and bodywork. This was real crooked and I still get mad. IF it takes 5 hours fine, fine you call after 1/2 hour and say this is going to take me five hours. What do you want to do? I was borderline on paying him and would have if he had called, otherwise there was business ethics involved and some lines you can't cross. Original quote was <$70 final price ~$250 = 400% this is wrong
For the phone call he could have said this is going to take 3 hours $195 final price $250 = extra 78% of estimate. In this town that kind of thing happens all the time and the parties involved work something out. Usually you pay up. Because its custom work and you are appeciative of that. But 400% and something is wrong.
 

AnonymousDude

Disabled
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
I can't see the point any more. using a waterblock - you get the best conducting material so there is less thermal resistance before it gets to the water. Why not skip the metal and go straight to the water! It works so much better. My block was made out of a sunny d bottle (as some people know) and works a dream with NO expense!
 

AnonymousDude

Disabled
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
yup! this baby is doing fine! I just wish a had a motherboard with mutiplier adjustment so I could try and overclock it higher than the 933 I could reach before hand :(

I made a similar one (which I'm using now) out of an old epoxy putty tube. It's smaller and works, but not quite as welll. I think it's the volume of water. I either need a better pump, or a bigger block.
 

coldmop

Registered
Joined
Mar 4, 2001
Good to hear. That Sunny D bottle cracked me up. You are way on to something, others will follow suit I'm sure. Until then I'll do my best to spread the "water on die" gospel. Heck may even go thru a conversion. With the four bolt mounting of waterblocks now available should be a piece of cake to switch over, just got to put the dress away.