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Help for a beginner wanting to overclock a Phenom II X6 1035T?

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MixedMartyr

New Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
I've had my PC for about 6 months now, and it's struggling to keep up with everything I want to do, but I can't afford a new processor. I have a good amount of knowledge about computer components, but absolutely zero experience with overclocking. I don't even know where to start or what softwares to download, all I know is that the overclocking software in the BIOS is completely useless so I need to do everything manually.
Here's my specs:
AMD Phenom II X6 1035T Processor
ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3 Motherboard
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus CPU Cooler
Corsair Vengeance LP RAM 8GB(2x4GB) @1600 Mhx
Generic OEM 500W Power Supply
128GB SSD
MSI GTX 750TI OC

Thanks for the help :)
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
You need to download and install the following tools to assist you in overclocking:

CPU-z (reports voltages, frequencies and lots of general information about your system and overclock settings).

HWMonitor (reports maximum, minimum and current temp, voltage and frequency values. We use this to track certain critical numbers during stress testing)

Prime95 ( we use this to put the CPU and memory under heavy load to make sure the overclock values in bios you have entered produce a stable condition)

I hope your 500W "generic" PSU is up to the challenge. That's the one question mark I have about your hardware. Cheap PSUs often don't give the clean, stable power and voltages you need for good overclocking.

The big concept you must keep in mind is that your CPU has an upwardly locked core frequency multiplier. That means you will have to overclock with the CPU frequency (aka, FSB or "Front Side Bus"). This is the master frequency of the system and other frequencies are harmonized with it. The importance of that fact is that it makes you have to manage not just the CPU frequency but the RAM, HT Link and CPU/NB (aka, NB). If any of these others get too high as you overclock the CPU frequency then instability occurs before your CPU has achieved it's overclock potential.

Another "big idea" to grasp is that when frequencies rise, more voltage is needed to support the higher speed to keep them stable, just like more gas is needed to make a car go faster.

Please read this tutorial to help prepare: http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php/596023-Dolk-s-Guide-to-the-Phenom-II
 
OP
M

MixedMartyr

New Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
You need to download and install the following tools to assist you in overclocking:

CPU-z (reports voltages, frequencies and lots of general information about your system and overclock settings).

HWMonitor (reports maximum, minimum and current temp, voltage and frequency values. We use this to track certain critical numbers during stress testing)

Prime95 ( we use this to put the CPU and memory under heavy load to make sure the overclock values in bios you have entered produce a stable condition)

I hope your 500W "generic" PSU is up to the challenge. That's the one question mark I have about your hardware. Cheap PSUs often don't give the clean, stable power and voltages you need for good overclocking.

The big concept you must keep in mind is that your CPU has an upwardly locked core frequency multiplier. That means you will have to overclock with the CPU frequency (aka, FSB or "Front Side Bus"). This is the master frequency of the system and other frequencies are harmonized with it. The importance of that fact is that it makes you have to manage not just the CPU frequency but the RAM, HT Link and CPU/NB (aka, NB). If any of these others get too high as you overclock the CPU frequency then instability occurs before your CPU has achieved it's overclock potential.

Another "big idea" to grasp is that when frequencies rise, more voltage is needed to support the higher speed to keep them stable, just like more gas is needed to make a car go faster.

Please read this tutorial to help prepare: http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php/596023-Dolk-s-Guide-to-the-Phenom-II

Thanks for the help :) I fixed a problem with only 5 cores activating and then got it to 3.5 Ghz stable, and that was without changing the voltage at all. I think I should probably get a more reliable power supply before messing with the voltage, but by the time I can afford a new one, I'll probably be able to just get an i5 2500k and an LGA motherboard along with it.