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HELP!! Intel i9-9900KF heat issues when folding - Boinc, max temps over 80C

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OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Sweet Jebus man, you were fine at 80/90C don't start this with 70C, lol....

Glad it worked for you. I would have saved the $100 though knowing the temps you had previously are just fine. :p

:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl: Actually I want to start this at 40C. Anyone have any liquid nitrogen I have? :clap: LOL!

No, lol, what I meant was that I could reduce my fan speeds more if I allowed the cpu up into the 70s. Thus making my office quieter. That is IF I allow them to get that hot. :D

Well, for the 100 bucks, peace of mind, and quieter office. Next time I will just buy the more expensive heatsink to start with. haha.


The rig could've doubled as a space heater on those cold winter nights [emoji39]

As I will probably need to replace the thermal paste once a year anyway, I can put the old one back on for winter. hahhahahahaha, but... it doesn't really get that cold here. normally 10-15C in winter. But with the recent news of the sun going into hybernation, it may snow in Taipei!! Scary thought. lol
 
OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Why? You don't need to do this either. ;)

I actually have talked to a few people about this.. They said once crunching diminishes like before, it is time to change the paste, and also one Intel engineer told me to probably do it once a year. I never did that before on my old machine either though. And I know ED, you think 80-90C is still ok no matter. haha.

Well.. Once the AC is off, I have to scale back my crunching to 60% and 60% to keep things under 80C again. I have to boost the fan speeds at night to 100% probably to keep it under if I want to utilize more CPU without heating up the chip too much, but there is no easy way for me to do this without readjusting everything. Once I install the English version of AI Suite maybe it will be easier to understand how to set up different profiles.
 
OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Lol, you and the shoddy advice you receive (and from so-called intel engineers)...

:eh?::shock::eek: I honestly don't know how to reply to that line.... They work in Intel... friends..... they wouldn't lie to me about this to make money... I agree that a cpu can last quite long even at higher temps. I know.. but peace of mind, and making it last even longer, is the goal. lol
 

ehume

Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2009
The Noctua heatsink had 6-7 heatpipes; that will make a difference right there.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
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:eh?::shock::eek: I honestly don't know how to reply to that line.... They work in Intel... friends..... they wouldn't lie to me about this to make money... I agree that a cpu can last quite long even at higher temps. I know.. but peace of mind, and making it last even longer, is the goal. lol
Their advice has been poor though... I know plenty of people that work at XX and don't know as much as some others.

For any system I wasn't benching/swapping parts out, I don't recall NEEDING to change my paste ever. I changed them on upgrades every couple of years.
 
OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
The Noctua heatsink had 6-7 heatpipes; that will make a difference right there.

It has 7. I went from 4 to 7. So, yeah... it makes a huge difference. But without AC, the 80C is still coming back. But I think that is because I lowered the fan speeds. Will test.

Their advice has been poor though... I know plenty of people that work at XX and don't know as much as some others.

For any system I wasn't benching/swapping parts out, I don't recall NEEDING to change my paste ever. I changed them on upgrades every couple of years.

Ahhh, I see. I see.. I get it. Makes sense. I have never changed paste either. And with how much was used this time.. lol... I hope using too much is not a bad thing... hahaha
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I do run into cases where TIM has dried out. I work on a lot of OEM computers and I do see this occasionally but they are usually like 10 years old. And it probably depends on the kind and quality of paste that was used.

techiemon, your intention of not having to do another upgrade for ten years may be a little optimistic. Technology changes much too fast to make a projection that far into the future. We have no idea what changes/innovations software producers will come up with in that amount of time that could render our systems obsolete or just inadequate.
 
OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
I do run into cases where TIM has dried out. I work on a lot of OEM computers and I do see this occasionally but they are usually like 10 years old. And it probably depends on the kind and quality of paste that was used.

techiemon, your intention of not having to do another upgrade for ten years may be a little optimistic. Technology changes much too fast to make a projection that far into the future. We have no idea what changes/innovations software producers will come up with in that amount of time that could render our systems obsolete or just inadequate.

I used the paste from Noctua. And no, I am not going to keep this pc for 10 years. That was never my intention. TBH, in years past I thought replacing the pc every 2 years was necessary. But I was younger and time went by much slower, getting older, the time for replacement kept getting longer. until this last one that made it for 7 years. Ideally, sure, 10 years is great, because that 10 years will go by as fast as 2 years went by when I was 20. haha. But realistically, yeah, I know.. My hope is that I can replace this one in about 4-6 years. I think the CPU should last that even at 80C, but again, I'd like to run more cores for more time during the evenings when I shut off the AC, but I am finding tonight it may still be hard to do that. But at least during the daytime I have no issues and temps are much better. Some tweaking left to do to find the sweet spot, I think partially can be achieved to keep temps below 80. But yeah, man, I know.. 10 years, never intended to do that. It's a bit ridiculous. And I will want a 16 core 32 thread chip when they come out. woo hoo!! I actually want a 100 core chip with 200 threads, man, can you imagine?

And yeah... PC might be long gone before my next upgrade the way technology is going.

But I have say... after an incident today with a 3 year old older android phone, battery started to swell... scared the heck out of me. unplugged turned off, it is now on my balcony. I need to pull data off of it, but frankly scared to touch the thing.. Cannot plug it in, but I need to pull data... I cannot imagine portable devices being so stable anytime in the near future. PC and server still needed for the long haul. But this is way off topic now. ha
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
As a general rule of thumb I recommend to my customer base to count on a new system about every 5 years, both to head off component failures and to keep technologically relevant.

Concerning your phone, your data is likely backed up automatically on some server managed by the either the manufacturer, google (android phone) or Apple (iPhone). So when you get a new phone you just connect to your account and it is downloaded onto the new phone.
 
OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
As a general rule of thumb I recommend to my customer base to count on a new system about every 5 years, both to head off component failures and to keep technologically relevant.

Concerning your phone, your data is likely backed up automatically on some server managed by the either the manufacturer, google (android phone) or Apple (iPhone). So when you get a new phone you just connect to your account and it is downloaded onto the new phone.

5 years is reasonable. And I think that may be a good time to upgrade.

As for the phone, not backed up I think. I have multiple phones. And I never connected that phone to any of those services that I recall. So no matter I still need to power it up.
 
OP
techiemon

techiemon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Is it an iPhone or an android-based phone?

Android. Asus brand, Zenphone 3 Max with large battery

I'd go to Amazon and pick up a cheap battery for it.

Not in the US. And wouldn't matter, this phone would be quiet difficult to change the battery myself, AND with how swollen it is, I hesitate to touch it.

Yep, if it's the kind of phone with a snap in battery. A lot of newer smart phones are not that type, however.

Cannot be changed by user it seems. This device is three years old. I frankly feel it got too hot. And thus one of the reasons it has issues. I was using it for crunching and folding also, and it probably got too hot, and Boinc needs these devices to be plugged in 24/7. I think that is bad overall, and thus have stopped using phones for crunching, so inefficient anyway.
 

skymeows

New Member
Joined
May 20, 2020
idk if someone already pointed it out but your system agent voltage is sitting at 2v?
i wouldnt go over 1.3 tbh