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HELP: Overclocked temperatures way too high for overclock itself.

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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Under load, your CPU fan should be turning much faster than that. From post #1 it shows the max speed under load as 981 rpm if my eyes are deceiving me. I think your CPU fan is not turning fast enough to efficiently carry away heat at those low speeds.

Putting in front push fans may help a little but the exhaust fans are much more important.They will pull in fresh air through the front grill.

Have you checked your fan profile settings in bios?
 
OP
J

jack3573135

Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Under load, your CPU fan should be turning much faster than that. From post #1 it shows the max speed under load as 981 rpm if my eyes are deceiving me. I think your CPU fan is not turning fast enough to efficiently carry away heat at those low speeds.

Putting in front push fans may help a little but the exhaust fans are much more important.
Where would i go to increase cpu fan speed on my asus mobo trents? thanks a bunch for the help btw. :)

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Under load, your CPU fan should be turning much faster than that. From post #1 it shows the max speed under load as 981 rpm if my eyes are deceiving me. I think your CPU fan is not turning fast enough to efficiently carry away heat at those low speeds. Putting in front push fans may help a little but the exhaust fans are much more important.They will pull in fresh air through the front grill. Have you checked your fan profile settings in bios?

and your recommended best voltages, core and cache, for 4.2 ghz??, rn its 1.145 V core, and 1.095 V cache.
 

Rainwater

Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Location
Portland
You should be able to set up fan profiles in the bios. I have like 7 pwm headers on mine but mine's a Deluxe. But Asus usually has the option to set fan profiles in bios. I use speedfan to control my fans but it took me about 20 min to figure out how to use it. I actually watched a video by JaystwoCents then it took another 15 minutes before I had it all set up. And I use 1.295v in bios with llc level 7 and I idle at 1.312v and under load I'm 1.328v for 4.5Ghz. I ran p95 version 26.6 for 3 hours at 1.296v but for the latest version 28.10 if I'm not pushing 1.328 I crash so this is where I rest. Expect to be closer to 1.3 than 1.2 I would imagine even for 4.2 but I may be incorrect. I've never had haswell. It took me 1.45v for 4.5Ghz with a Sandy Bridge i7 and it takes me 1.32v for my Skylake.
 
OP
J

jack3573135

Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Imma add all this advice to BIOS settings now, thanks again to all of you who helped! you need more stars :)

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You should be able to set up fan profiles in the bios. I have like 7 pwm headers on mine but mine's a Deluxe. But Asus usually has the option to set fan profiles in bios. I use speedfan to control my fans but it took me about 20 min to figure out how to use it. I actually watched a video by JaystwoCents then it took another 15 minutes before I had it all set up. And I use 1.295v in bios with llc level 7 and I idle at 1.312v and under load I'm 1.328v for 4.5Ghz. I ran p95 version 26.6 for 3 hours at 1.296v but for the latest version 28.10 if I'm not pushing 1.328 I crash so this is where I rest. Expect to be closer to 1.3 than 1.2 I would imagine even for 4.2 but I may be incorrect. I've never had haswell. It took me 1.45v for 4.5Ghz with a Sandy Bridge i7 and it takes me 1.32v for my Skylake.

really! mine seems to be running good on 1.145 V on 4.2 ghz, seems odd?

- - - Updated - - -

You should be able to set up fan profiles in the bios. I have like 7 pwm headers on mine but mine's a Deluxe. But Asus usually has the option to set fan profiles in bios. I use speedfan to control my fans but it took me about 20 min to figure out how to use it. I actually watched a video by JaystwoCents then it took another 15 minutes before I had it all set up. And I use 1.295v in bios with llc level 7 and I idle at 1.312v and under load I'm 1.328v for 4.5Ghz. I ran p95 version 26.6 for 3 hours at 1.296v but for the latest version 28.10 if I'm not pushing 1.328 I crash so this is where I rest. Expect to be closer to 1.3 than 1.2 I would imagine even for 4.2 but I may be incorrect. I've never had haswell. It took me 1.45v for 4.5Ghz with a Sandy Bridge i7 and it takes me 1.32v for my Skylake.

may i ask, what is all this llc stuff, what would i need to be on? and how would i set it? after knowing what it is?
 

Rainwater

Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Location
Portland
Load Line Calibration helps adjust your voltage under load. My first test run was 1.345v with llc at 5 and I would drop to 1.312 under load. Since I want to idle lower than my load voltage I'm at level 7. I had it where I idled at 1.296v llc 7 and under load I was at 1.312v. After the p95 28.10 crash I idle at 1.312 and jump to 1.328v under load.

I test for hours tho. 5 plus hours of Aida64, at least 2-3 hours p95 blend, then another 3-6 hours Realbench. If I can do all that in that order without a crash I call it good. Then for good measure and to see where I'm at with temps I run p95 version 28.10. It always seems to take just a little more than the rest of the tests. But initial stability before I start a long test with more towards final setting I run with p95 26.6 to see where I'm at.

Put some fans in there and at least run a few hours of Aida or Realbench before you consider yourself stable stable they are more intense then itu but better with heat than ibt and p95.
 
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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
LLC=Load Line Calibration.

It is a voltage supplement technology to compensate for voltage drops (from what they are set to in bios), particularly under load. That was the original intent of the technology when it came out years ago but often it is implemented in a way to supplement vcore under load. On some motherboards the amount of supplementation is adjustable.
 
OP
J

jack3573135

Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Load Line Calibration helps adjust your voltage under load. My first test run was 1.345v with llc at 5 and I would drop to 1.312 under load. Since I want to idle lower than my load voltage I'm at level 7. I had it where I idled at 1.296v llc 7 and under load I was at 1.312v. After the p95 28.10 crash I idle at 1.312 and jump to 1.328v under load.

LLC=Load Line Calibration.

It is a voltage supplement technology to compensate for voltage drops (from what they are set to in bios), particularly under load. That was the original intent of the technology when it came out years ago but often it is implemented in a way to supplement vcore under load. On some motherboards the amount of supplementation is adjustable.

Ok, so i kinda understand it.... would i need it for 1.145 V, and if so, at around what level roughly?
 

Rainwater

Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Location
Portland
That all depends on your motherboard. Trents actually described the meaning of it I just gave an example. Use Cpu-z or hwmonitor, and while I'm here I noticed eaelier you downloaded a plethora of monitoring tools. It is not recommended to use multiple tools at one time. I cannot use hwinfo64 at all as it freezes my system immediately. I use cpu-z and hw monitor that is it. Watch your idle vcore and watch it under load to see if it goes up or down. Then change llc up or down accordingly to see at what level of setting it will cause your vcore to drop and what setting will casue it to raise under load and how much. I don't think for one second 1.1 anything is going to be enough at 4.2 Ghz to pass a couple hours of stress testing. If you can get thru a 2 hour gaming session at 1.145 that's impressive but for me level 5 cause vdroop or my vcore to lower under load. And idle for that matter. 6 keeps it the same under load and 7 raises just a hair. Yours may be similar, maybe not.
 
OP
J

jack3573135

Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
That all depends on your motherboard. Trents actually described the meaning of it I just gave an example. Use Cpu-z or hwmonitor, and while I'm here I noticed eaelier you downloaded a plethora of monitoring tools. It is not recommended to use multiple tools at one time. I cannot use hwinfo64 at all as it freezes my system immediately. I use cpu-z and hw monitor that is it. Watch your idle vcore and watch it under load to see if it goes up or down. Then change llc up or down accordingly to see at what level of setting it will cause your vcore to drop and what setting will casue it to raise under load and how much. I don't think for one second 1.1 anything is going to be enough at 4.2 Ghz to pass a couple hours of stress testing. If you can get thru a 2 hour gaming session at 1.145 that's impressive but for me level 5 cause vdroop or my vcore to lower under load. And idle for that matter. 6 keeps it the same under load and 7 raises just a hair. Yours may be similar, maybe not.

i will do a 5 min stress test now and see if theres a voltage drop, if not do i need any different llc's?
 
OP
J

jack3573135

Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
That all depends on your motherboard. Trents actually described the meaning of it I just gave an example. Use Cpu-z or hwmonitor, and while I'm here I noticed eaelier you downloaded a plethora of monitoring tools. It is not recommended to use multiple tools at one time. I cannot use hwinfo64 at all as it freezes my system immediately. I use cpu-z and hw monitor that is it. Watch your idle vcore and watch it under load to see if it goes up or down. Then change llc up or down accordingly to see at what level of setting it will cause your vcore to drop and what setting will casue it to raise under load and how much. I don't think for one second 1.1 anything is going to be enough at 4.2 Ghz to pass a couple hours of stress testing. If you can get thru a 2 hour gaming session at 1.145 that's impressive but for me level 5 cause vdroop or my vcore to lower under load. And idle for that matter. 6 keeps it the same under load and 7 raises just a hair. Yours may be similar, maybe not.
well i didnt drop any voltage in that stress test, but its probably cuz its a short one
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
jack, I think the LLC thing should be saved for later. You came to us asking help with cooling issues but have gotten side tracked. You need to get your fans and cooling squared away before you start supplementing voltage. Your temps will not permit increases at this point.
 
OP
J

jack3573135

Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
jack, I think the LLC thing should be saved for later. You came to us asking help with cooling issues but have gotten side tracked. You need to get your fans and cooling squared away before you start supplementing voltage. Your temps will not permit increases at this point.

ok thanks for help anyways :)