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Help overclocking 5 GHz i7 2600K on Asus P8Z77-V Deluxe with Phanteks PH-TC14PE

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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
What makes you think that chip has the capability to overclock that far? A certain percentage of those Sandybridges would get to 5 ghz but that is certainly not the norm. You're probably looking at more like 4.7 ghz.
 

Ozz1

Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2016
im wondering as the sandy bridge is out of my league altogether and im not sure which particular sandy bridge model of cpu it was i read about , was a fair while ago now, but ive read there was a tim issue between the chip and the ihs plate (cant remember whether it was bad tim or just poorly applied from factory) which was causing excessive heat which affects performance and they delidded the cpu and retimmed and temps went down considerably allowing for better oc ability and also for just normal running
 

Silver_Pharaoh

Likes the big ones n00b Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
im wondering as the sandy bridge is out of my league altogether and im not sure which particular sandy bridge model of cpu it was i read about , was a fair while ago now, but ive read there was a tim issue between the chip and the ihs plate (cant remember whether it was bad tim or just poorly applied from factory) which was causing excessive heat which affects performance and they delidded the cpu and retimmed and temps went down considerably allowing for better oc ability and also for just normal running
All sandy bridge chips have solder ;)
haswell does not.
 

Ozz1

Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2016
All sandy bridge chips have solder ;)
haswell does not.

ah ok silver thx, when you said solder, that jogged my memory a bit of what i read, was it a poor solder issue they were having then that was causing this heat issue i was reading about? as at the time i was considering looking at buying 1 and when i read about this heat issue i steered away from it
 

macsbeach98

New Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2012
Sandy bridge IHS is soldered Ivy Bridge and later is not.
Look most Sandy bridges can be pushed up to 5Ghz and some a bit faster for benching on ambient cooling but you will need close to or just above 1.5v .
With your Air cooling it isnt going to be a long term thing for 24/7 use the chip it will degrade quickly over time.
As said above try for 4.7 or 4.8 you should be able to get that with 1.4 or lower voltage
 

Silver_Pharaoh

Likes the big ones n00b Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
ah ok silver thx, when you said solder, that jogged my memory a bit of what i read, was it a poor solder issue they were having then that was causing this heat issue i was reading about? as at the time i was considering looking at buying 1 and when i read about this heat issue i steered away from it
I never read about a poor soldering job... If it's really bad though could probably just heat it up and fix it yourself! Risky though!!!
Sandy bridge IHS is soldered Ivy Bridge and later is not.
Look most Sandy bridges can be pushed up to 5Ghz and some a bit faster for benching on ambient cooling but you will need close to or just above 1.5v .
With your Air cooling it isnt going to be a long term thing for 24/7 use the chip it will degrade quickly over time.
As said above try for 4.7 or 4.8 you should be able to get that with 1.4 or lower voltage
Ivy. Ivy Bridge. That's what I meant to type! I forgot about Ivy and skipped to haswell! :chair:
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
I never read about a poor soldering job... If it's really bad though could probably just heat it up and fix it yourself! Risky though!!!

Ivy. Ivy Bridge. That's what I meant to type! I forgot about Ivy and skipped to haswell! :chair:

Ivy Bridge wasn't that memorable, so you're fine :p