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[HELP] Overclocking Athlon II X4 630

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pcwhockey18

Registered
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
Hi there,

I am very new to the overclocking scene and have had an old Athlon II laying around so I figured I would see what I could get out of it in terms of performance. I have read a little but wanted to get pointed in the correct direction. I have ran a stress test with OCCT and have my HWMonitor screen shots

HWMonitor.PNG
HWMonitor1.PNG

My current hardware is:

ASUS M5A78L-M/USB3
Athlon II X4 630
8GB RAM Single Channel
Corsair CX750M PSU
EVGA GEFORCE GTX 1070
Cryorig H7 Tower cooler
Phanteks Enthoo Pro PH-ES614P Case

Here are my CPU-Z Screens:

CPUZ-CPU.PNG
CPUZ-RAM.PNG

To be frank I am not sure where to begin. Any help would be appreciated.
 
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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Paull, your core temps are maxing out at 36c and that gives you 20c or so of overclocking head room. I'm guessing socket/VRM temp is being reported by TMPIN0. You want that one to stay under about 70c during overclocking.

You'll want to go into bios and change the memory divider so that your RAM is running at 1066 instead of 1600 to give you some headroom since the RAM speed will grow as you increase the FSB. And you don't want the RAM to become the source of instability and sabotage the overclock before you get the cores overclocked very much. You need to realize that when CPU-z shows a DRAM Frequency of 800 mhz (rounded) that actually means your RAM is running at 1600 mhz. CPU-z is not reporting the DDR3 speed but the frequency of the memory bus which is half the rated speed of the RAM. So when you get through making that adjustment in bios you should see CPU-z report the DRAM Frequency as 533 mhz. Just double that number in your head to get the actual DDR3 speed.

The other two frequencies you need to keep an eye on during the over clock process is the HT Link frequency (which shows approximately 2000 mhz in the first CPU-z screen shot) and the NB frequency . These two will grow as well as you increase the FSB.

I want you to make a small change to see how this works before you change anything else. So increase the FSB (CPU Frequency) from the stock 200 mhz to 205 mhz. Then post back with screen shots of the CPU-z "CPU" tab and the "Memory" tab. You should see that not only is the CPU (the cores) running faster but so is the memory, the HT Link and the NB.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Do you see how when you made that 5 mhz change in Bus Speed (i.e., FSB) the HT Link and the NB jumped up to 2050 and the DRAM Frequncy went from 533 (1066) to 547 (1084 mhz)?

The reason I had you do this little exercise is to show you the interdependence of those bus frequencies. The significance of it is this: in the process of overclocking the core frequency bus if any of the dependent bus frequencies get too high then they can cause instability long before the cores max their overclock out. So there are junctures when those dependent buses must be retarded in order to prevent that from happening. The NB can actually be overclocked quite a bit without causing a problem but the HT Link will not tolerate much of an overclock.

More tomorrow. Bed time.
 

ShrimpBrime

~MadHatDeLidder~
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
If you want more performance, try core unlocker (if available in bios) If it works, it may unlock L3 cache.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I think it might be wise to keep it simple and not add factors that could contribute to instability and/or extra heat. Learn the basics first and then we can come back to core unlocker. OP is a novice.


Paul, here are the bios parameters you will be working with and some tentative overclocking goals:

FSB (aka, CPU frequency): initial goal will be 250 mhz

CPU core voltage (what we call "vcore")

HT (aka, HT Link): keep it between 1800 and 2100 mhz. Running it faster than the stock 2000 mhz has no real impact on performance but can cause instability if it departs very much from stock on the CPU family you are currently overclocking

NB (aka, CPU/NB): 2500 mhz. This is the memory controller bridge component and overclocking it helps speed up the communication between CPU cores and memory.

NB or CPU/NB voltage: in my experience a voltage of about 1.225 is adequate to support a frequency of 2500 mhz

Memory frequency: Initial goal will be to get it back up to 1333 mhz, the rating of the CPU/NB. We may be able to get it higher when all is said and done. If my memory serves me correctly, that will coincide with a FSB of 250 mhz.


In HWMonitor during stress testing, watch:

1. the maximum core temperature. 55-57c is about all this CPU will take and remain stable in an overclocked state
2. the TIMP0 line. Max we want to see is about 70c

Procedure:
1. Initially add .025 to the vcore and manually set the NB (CPU/NB) to 1.225. This should jump start you in the overclocking process and get you to a certain point.
2. Increase the FSB (CPU frequency) 210 mhz
3. Run Prime 95 (or OCCT) for 20 minutes
4. Watch the two temps mentioned above
5. If you pass the 20 minute stress test then add a 5 mhz increment to the FSB to bring it to 215 mhz

Repeat above steps until you cannot pass the 20 minute stress test. Failing can look like BSOD (blue screen of death), spontaneous restar of computer, lock up of computer or if using Prime95, one of the four core workers may drop out. If using OCCT, you may hear a duck quack sound if detects an error during the stess test.

When you first fail the stress test, add another .01 to the vcore. So for instance, if you fail the stress test at a vcore of 1.3, then bump it up to 1.31 and retest. Add more vcore will help stabilize the overclock. You should not use more than 1.5 vcore for 24/7 computing use but your temps may not allow you to set it that high anyway.

So in a nut shell, increase FSB in 5 mhz increments, stresss test and monitor temps. Keep adding 5 mhz FSB increments until you fail the stress test and then add more vcore and retest.

Eventually you will come to a point where either high temps or high voltage will not allow you to add anymore to the FSB in order to pass the stress test. At that point we want to move to a longer stress test to confirm staiblity. 2 hr. for Prime95 and 3 hr. for OCCT. If you can't pass the long stress test and you have no more temp or voltage room, dial back the FSB by 5 mhz. and rerun the long test. If you stil fail, dial it back some more.

When you get stuck or feel like you have reached your max overclock, post back with results and pics from HWMonitor and CPU-z (tabs "CPU," "Memory," and "SPD" so we can see what max temps and voltages are immediately after stress testing.

As you can see, this is a rather slow and incremental process but this is how we overclock safely and systematically. Systematically, meaning not changing a bunch of things in all at one time or in big leaps so we can spot the cause of instability and make adjustments.
 
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OP
P

pcwhockey18

Registered
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
Awesome! Thank you Harry! I will run these tests and get back to you when complete. One thing just to clarify, every time I add 5 mhz, am I adding .025 to the vcore?
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
No, after adding the first .025 vcore don't add anymore until you start to fail the stress test. You will see that as your overclock rises it will become more and more difficult to get it stable at just one more increment of core speed increase. It does not scale in a liner fashion by any means. You will eventually get to the point were either temps or voltage becomes a limiting factor and that will be your max overclock.
 
OP
P

pcwhockey18

Registered
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Apr 3, 2017
Well I am not sure if I did something wrong, but it failed after the first test. As far as changing the CPU/NB Frequency the closest I can get it is to 1260MHz.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
You don't need to change the CPU/NB frequency until it gets too high. Stock is 2000 mhz and you don't want to go below that. Eventually you want it to be around 2500 as it will rises with increases in the FSB. The reason it crashed right away is probably because your CPU/NB frequency was lower than your HT. The will for sure create instability. The CPU/NB frequency cannot be lower than the HT. Help me understand why you lowered it. Was something not clear in my directions?
 
OP
P

pcwhockey18

Registered
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
No, it is my fault or the lack of overclocking knowledge that I have, I apologize. I am not sure how to change the NB voltage. I am going to grab the manual for the motherboard and try to figure it out.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
There is confusion in terminology between "NB" and "CPU/NB." There is history to this that I won't go into but some bioses use the label "NB" in a legacy since to refer to the onboard GPU. T he CPU/NB is not that NB. Leave the GPU NB alone.

I really need to see what you see in bios to help you sort things out. You can take a screenshot of the bios with the F12 key and save it to a flash drive. You can then attach that file to a post. The screenshot is just that. It will only show what you see on the screen, not the whole page.
 
OP
P

pcwhockey18

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Apr 3, 2017
Okay, I believe I figured it out. I couldn't take screenshots with the F12 not sure if my bios supports it, but I took some with my phone.

Here are the pictures of the bios:

image1.JPG
image2.JPG

As for the first test, I passed with the first config and as long as you don't see anything wrong, I will start with the progression.

Here are the 210 shots:

Capture0.PNG
Capture1.PNG
Capture2.PNG
Capture3.PNG

Thanks again Harry!
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Looks good so far.

If you can't find some of the basic adjustments (like CPU/NB voltage) they can be hidden by "Auto." Things must be taken off of Auto and manually configured.

Proceed.
 

ShrimpBrime

~MadHatDeLidder~
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
I think it might be wise to keep it simple and not add factors that could contribute to instability and/or extra heat. Learn the basics first and then we can come back to core unlocker. OP is a novice.

Oh super green. That's ok. I wasn't trying to interfere.

Another simple way to get really good performance from this is to actually buy a Phenom II quad core. (used and super cheap E-bay)

Then to keep it "simple" apply multiplier overclocking only as the Athlon doesn't have what we might refer to as "simple overclocking" while you have to change almost every single parameter.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I think OP just had this current setup laying around and wanted to see what he could get out of it without sinking money into it. I think it's a "learner" for him. If he can get get the think overclocked well he really will have learned a lot and doing it with a multiplier unlocked CPU will be that much easier.
 
OP
P

pcwhockey18

Registered
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Apr 3, 2017
Okay so just ran into my first problem. I am at 225 on the FSB and increased my vCore voltage by the minimum, and I have failed for the second time. The temps are all fine with plenty of room. I am not sure if I need to increase the voltage again or what my next move is.

Here are my settings for now:

Capture.PNG
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
When you post, we need to see these three tabs on CPU-z: CPU, Memory and SPD. Not enough info to make a confident guess but at 1.236 your vcore is pretty low. I would expect you will need between 1.45-1.485 - something like that - to find your max overclock. So increase the vcore some more. If low vcore is the problem, even though you fail the stress test, it should run longer than it did on the previous vcore amount.

Also, look at your HT Link frequency. It's now climbed over 2200 mhz. Stock is 2000 and that one won't take much overclock. Do you remember I mentioned that in an earlier post? Drop it down under 2200. Keep an eye on that one. It would be a good idea to reread my instructions.
 
OP
P

pcwhockey18

Registered
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
Sorry guys I will remember that from now on! Trents, it did run longer the second time after I increased the vcore voltage.

Here are all three tabs:

Capture.PNG
Capture0.PNG
Capture1.PNG