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How a core/rad works (sticky please)

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Korndog

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Location
California
very nice thorilan.
this would make a nice reference.

a few questions though.
Q, from what i've learned, is heat, not the rate of heat/time.
the equation i learned was dQ/dT = uAdeltaT, although thats with derivitives, i think it would still be Q/T for an approx. answer. The units are all right though.
 

SwampThing

Member
Joined
May 14, 2004
In thermal stufff, Q is just heat (thermal energy) measured in Joules. I or P is used for heat currents (dQ/dt) or power dissipation. Metric units would be better -- how many talk about their CPU's heat output in BTU/hr?

Too little surface area could raise velocities, thus friction losses, and shorten the coil's service life.
Not sure what you're talking about there.
 

SwampThing

Member
Joined
May 14, 2004
True, this is for rads - rads in a computer water cooling forum. Since we use them to dissipate heat from our CPUs, GPUs, and pumps (heat that everyone measures in watts), why force everyone to convert to BTU when thinking about their radiator? Is the BTU a popular unit in Japan? Metric units are internationally understood.

Mechanical wear from high velocities -- got it.
 

Como

Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2003
Location
Maine
"Is the BTU a popular unit in Japan"

btu = brittish thermal unit.
i couldnt resist :)

nice post. if i understood more i'd probably have a question about it...i have a feeling it will mean mre to me in a month or 2.

sticky please :)
 

uthungover

Registered
Joined
Mar 23, 2004
Location
Kansas
thorilan said:
see the thing is you cant define a quantity of heat without giving a time

Yes you can, heat is a quantity of energy.

Q is just a confusing symbol to use in this equation because it means dQ/dt = power.

Otherwise, great post.
 

pauldenton

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2003
Location
London, England
Como said:
"Is the BTU a popular unit in Japan"

btu = brittish thermal unit.
i couldnt resist :)

nice post. if i understood more i'd probably have a question about it...i have a feeling it will mean mre to me in a month or 2.

sticky please :)
one British Thermal Unit [Btu] is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of
1 pound [ lb.] of water 1 degree Fahrenheit.


http://www.simetric.co.uk/sibtu.htm

in the UK it's only used with reference to obsolete equipment (boilers etc) - current equipment has to be specified in SI units (by law)

i doubt it's a popular unit anywhere outside the USA, which is about the only place where pounds and fahrenheit are still in (official) use