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How do you put your thermal paste on?

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bdf24

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
Harford, WI.
How do you guys do it. I have read on numerous occasions that you should only use a very, very paper thin layer. Me being stubbern, I've alway just put a drop on my finger and spread it across the core. I always figured that any extra would get squeezed out by the pressure. So putting to much on did'nt matter. Am I wrong? And if so will putting a much thinner layer on lower the temps?
 

Michael_Myers

Member
Joined
May 15, 2001
yes it matters, and yes it will lower your temps.

Too much COULD heat up, liquify and run down inside your chip. I stress COULD. Probably wouldn't.

However, the thin layer transfers heat better to your HSF. If the heat has to go through a big glob of gook, it ain't gonna transfer heat very well.

Plus, your finger has oil on it. Verrrryyyyy baaaaad etiquet for OCing, plus it makes a difference with the heat.

Best way is to put just a little bit on one corner of the die, and spread it EVENLY around with a credit card or other thin, flat device. *IF* there is enough to go on the chip, and runs over the side, you put too much. Just keep spreading it thin, and try to get the stuff off the sides with a q-tip. That's what I do.

It does make a difference.
 

cookedcomp

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Location
Mt. Brudges, Ontario, CA
well i have never seen a difference accept for the difference between thermal past and no thermal past. I apply it by putting a small amount on my finger and just puting it in the center of the core, then i let the heatsink do the rest.
 

Paiynn

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2001
I've used a razor blade and I prefer a blade with a rounded edge actually, I find it easier to spread with. A razor tends to wipe the paste off and its harder to glide it back on than with a rounded. I've never used my finger if for no other reason that the stuff is a pain to get off your skin. Even if I do believe the oil on the skin thing :)
 

Cowtown

Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2001
Location
Calgary, AB
I put my thermal paste on one leg at a time, just like everyone else.... :)

But seriously...

I have used both a credit card and a razor blade and both are a PITA, especially when you see the nice layer they don on artic silver's web site! ;(

But that being said my wife usually gets a good laugh watching me painstakingly spread and respread again the artic silver so I can get it as nice as possible.
 

sfa ok

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2001
Location
Colorado/Chicago
I used to do the credit card thing, but now I put a little blob on the center of the core, clean my finger really well with alchohol, and spread it out. I don't mind having a silver finger, anyway.

Edit: 700th post, pretty stars. Feel happy for me.
 

cjtune

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
You fellas really shouldn't bother. The 70 to 150 psi pressure on the CPU core from the clips will squish and spread the thermal paste anyways. The excess paste will ooze out to the sides and unless it's potentially conductive like AS2 then it should be no danger. As for it liquifying and running all over the chip, bear in mind it is at as high a temp as you have cooled the CPU itself (40'C? 50'C?) and those temps should be pretty mild.
 

Bobby Manus

Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
Location
Southern California
They say there thermal grease lowers temps 2-7 degrees lower then other thermal compunds... Other themal compunds probably lower it another 2-5 already... That means the diff of using thermal grease or not using thermal grease could lower you like 10+ C??? Oh my that would be the day!
 

It_The_Cow

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Indiana
cjtune (Aug 02, 2001 01:15 a.m.):
The 70 to 150 psi pressure on the CPU core from the clips will squish and spread the thermal paste anyways.
Whoa, 70 psi would cruch a core immediately. Most clips apply ~15 -20 psi. It would still be enough to squeeze out the stuff, though
 

cjtune

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
It_The_Cow (Aug 02, 2001 01:27 a.m.):
cjtune (Aug 02, 2001 01:15 a.m.):
The 70 to 150 psi pressure on the CPU core from the clips will squish and spread the thermal paste anyways.
Whoa, 70 psi would cruch a core immediately. Most clips apply ~15 -20 psi. It would still be enough to squeeze out the stuff, though

No, no, the clamping FORCE is 12 to 24 lbf (pound-force), the clamping PRESSURE is the clamping force per area in contact. A Duron core is about 1cm2 right? That's 0.155 in2. Of course, the actual pressure is lower due to the tiny pads at the sides of the CPU.
 
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bdf24

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
Harford, WI.
There seems to be mixed feelings about how to put the stuff on. And wether or not to much is bad or if it even makes a difference. I'll have to try taking mine off and reaplying the paste with a credit card evenly and see if it makes a difference.
 
W

William

Guest
you want to make sure you have enough to cover the core. If you are using expensive stuff like AS2 then you want to take your time and apply on what is needed. Sure you can slather the cpu with i and it will squish out, but thats pretty wasteful. AS2 isn't conductive except below like -40C at very high pressure.
 

Blue Jester_2112

Member
Joined
May 11, 2001
I squeeze out a tiny dab of ASII onto a sandwich baggy. Then I scoop up a little bit with a buisiness card and paint it onto the core. Th card bends just enough to allow it to spread on evenly and thin but is rigid enough to scoop up any excess as you go over it. I do 2-3 passes with the card to get it even, thin and over the whole core and it comes out perfect nearly everytime. Just like the picture on the AS web page.
 
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bdf24

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
Harford, WI.
Yes I know it's wastefull to just smear it on. But I'm only using Radio Shack paste. So it's very cheap. If I were using ASII I would be a lot more conservative in applying it cause of the costs.