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How hot is too hot?

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jim418

New Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2000
I have a Celeron 300 that I am running at 100MHz so that it effectively runs at 450 MHz.

My motherboard (DFI P2XBL) has software that monitors the temp. The only thing is I don't know how hot is too hot? Any advice on what temp I should keep it below? Thanks!
 

dimmreaper

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2000
Location
home
The CPU is too Hot when the heat generates perminent, irreversable damage to the silicon. Anything under that and you should be fine . . . .
 
OP
J

jim418

New Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2000
I guess I'm looking for a bit more specific guidance. Like is 100 Farenheit too hot?
 

KC Coldbrook

Registered
Joined
Dec 22, 2000
100F (38C) is fine.

I would say 122F (50C) is probably getting too hot.

Be careful about comparing P3 internal temp sensors with external CPU temp sensors such as in-socket 370 diodes, and especially don't confuse the motherboard case-temp sensor with CPU temp.

For example, when switching from a cheap thermal pad to Arctic Silver paste, for example:

- A P3 thermal diode reading should go DOWN
- A in-socket-370 sensor reading should go DOWN
- A heatsink sensor reading should go UP (more efficient transfer)

I always worry when somebody tells me their heatsink is working well because it's "cool to the touch".

KC
 

dimmreaper

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2000
Location
home
jim418 (Dec 23, 2000 08:09 p.m.):
I guess I'm looking for a bit more specific guidance. Like is 100 Farenheit too hot?
Jim, I was just BSing you. KC has it right . . . . . .

Sorry bout that . . . . .
 

dadx2mj

Registered
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
I have the exact same mother board and CPU in my kids computer. I would say if it gets to 50c under a load you are hurting it. 45-49 I would be looking for better cooling with the goal of keeping it under 40. They have a dual fan Global Win cooler can't remember the model # and 1 intake and 2 exauhst fans it is also clocked to 450 Mhz and runs at about 35-38c under a load
 

wild_andy_c

NAKED Overclockers Unite! Senior
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
Location
Milton Keynes UK
Here is a specific example - 54°c killed by celeron 300a.

It was doing 549Mhz on BE6-2 at the time with over 2.2v hacked volts. Cooling was the issue however.

The cooler the better - then CMOS gives a potential state of acceleration.
 

EIGHTBALL

New Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2000
KC Coldbrook (Dec 23, 2000 09:11 p.m.):
100F (38C) is fine.

I would say 122F (50C) is probably getting too hot.

Be careful about comparing P3 internal temp sensors with external CPU temp sensors such as in-socket 370 diodes, and especially don't confuse the motherboard case-temp sensor with CPU temp.

For example, when switching from a cheap thermal pad to Arctic Silver paste, for example:

- A P3 thermal diode reading should go DOWN
- A in-socket-370 sensor reading should go DOWN
- A heatsink sensor reading should go UP (more efficient transfer)

I always worry when somebody tells me their heatsink is working well because it's "cool to the touch".

KC

***************************************
What are these internal vs. external CPU temperatures you speak of? My ASUS PROBE software for my ASUS CUV4X only shows 1 CPU temperature... is this the temperature I should be going by? Is it showing the internal or external CPU temperature?
(I have a Celeron 566 at 100.2 FSB for 852MHz.)
 

kn7671

Registered
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Depends on the CPU completely! Ever CPU has it limits. Intel and AMD both publish the max temperatures the CPU could theoretically withstand, as well as recommend maximum operating temps for a particular model of CPU. Obviously AMD processors run hotter, and they had to engineer the fact that they were going to run hotter into the processor design, otherwise failure would occur very easily. Intel prides themselves on less current usage, and better thermal characterisitics, therefore most of their CPU's are not designed to handle the kind of heat AMD processers endure. This does not mean AMD processors are better because of the heat issue, but simply that Intel will not withstand the high temps. I would have to guess this is why AMD still uses a ceramic substrate to mount their cores into, and Intel uses a plastic epoxy. The ceramic will absorb some of the heat and assist in cooling, the plastic epoxy Intel uses is a very poor conductor and will force the CPU to retain most of its heat and transfer all of it to the heatsink, but since Intel processors displace less wattage, power, they run cooler. In the end, refer to manufacturers documentation for the real information on heat and power limits.