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How long can a Cat5e cable be before you start experiences problems?

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o0OBruceLeeO0o

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
Location
Charlotte, NC
The reason I ask is because I need to run the cable from my router, downstairs, to my pc, upstairs. It will be about 100ft maybe more cause I cant put holes through walls or run it through the roof because I am moving soon. Thanks in advance for replies :)
 

Jon

Just Another Retired Moderator
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
Lawrenceville, GA
Tipycol said:
About the title, what are some problems that could occur with a long cable?

Lost/incomplete packets mainly due to signal degredation.

100ft will be no problem at all...I run at least twice that to my dad's office from my router here.
 

Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Jon said:


Lost/incomplete packets mainly due to signal degredation.

100ft will be no problem at all...I run at least twice that to my dad's office from my router here.

K thanks

Originally posted by Mike K
328ft. then you need an amplifier

Is that what you needed it for or is that an exact mark? And what did you need it so long for anyway?
 

Mike K

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2001
Location
Chicago, Illinois
Tipycol said:


K thanks



Is that what you needed it for or is that an exact mark? And what did you need it so long for anyway?

Is that what I needed what for? And it is exact within a half or so of a foot
 

Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Mike K said:


Is that what I needed what for? And it is exact within a half or so of a foot

Err...well....I kinda worded it wrong ;)
What I meant was, did you really use a cable that long for your network? Or did you just find it listed somewhere that you need an amplifier after that mark?


Sorry for my poor choice of words :D

Tipycol
 
Last edited:

su root

Senior Member, --, I teach people how to read your
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Location
Ontario, Canada
100meters = 328feet is the limit IEEE imposes. If you absolutely need, you can probably run it a little ways longer without too much penalty, but nowadays anything you would need to run that far you could run fibre or put in an amplifyer or repeater.
 

Huckleberry

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2002
Location
Just East of the mall
100 meters is the specification for UTP Cat5. Good cable and better components can usually get you a bit extra. If you are in a noisy environment (EMF-wise) then that will reduce your ability to send a good signal even to 100 meters. Try to avoid fluorescent light ballasts, motors (like your furnace or AC motor), running your Ethernet cable parallel to power cables, etc.

Badly crimped ends, tweaked cable and the like will of course also degrade your ability to reach max distance. 100ft should cause no problem though.
 

su root

Senior Member, --, I teach people how to read your
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Location
Ontario, Canada
Tipycol said:
Hmm....guess I'll have to find another route for my cable :(

for short distances, running it parallel is fine, but over long distances, or if you have it right beside the power cables, then it's going to cause interference.

Generally you want to keep it away from any source of EMI (electro-magnetic intereference) interference, like AC generators, flourescent lights, and power cords. Placing a piece of metal inbetween them should shield the EMI affects of the power cord... also note we are talking about in-wall house power cords more than a computer's power cord.
 

Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
su root said:
for short distances, running it parallel is fine, but over long distances, or if you have it right beside the power cables, then it's going to cause interference.

Generally you want to keep it away from any source of EMI (electro-magnetic intereference) interference, like AC generators, flourescent lights, and power cords. Placing a piece of metal inbetween them should shield the EMI affects of the power cord... also note we are talking about in-wall house power cords more than a computer's power cord.

Hmm...maybe I don't have to move it anymore :D


Thanks

Tipycol
 

su root

Senior Member, --, I teach people how to read your
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Location
Ontario, Canada
Tipycol said:
Hmm...maybe I don't have to move it anymore :D


Thanks

Tipycol
If you are getting descent connectivity, then you really don't need to. You can check if you have XP, in your connection status box, it'll tell you the number of errors it has encountered. If that's a large and growing number, you may want to move it.