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How long do AIO watercoolers work? Can they be repaired?

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NoahWL

New Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2016
So I'm wondering how long the average AIO watercooler will last. I don't really have the money and don't want to deal with the hassle of a custom loop, so I'm going with the Corsair Hydro Series H110i GT because of it's good reviews and compatibility with my case. So, how long do these things last? What usually goes first? I'd imagine the pump, but it's probably obvious I'm new to this so I don't know for certain. If something breaks, can it be fixed? Also, are there warning signs to one of these breaking, so I can know if it may start leaking all over my computer at some point? Sorry for all the questions, I hope someone can help answer them. Thanks!
 

Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
Generally the only thing to break is the pump. If you're lucky you will hear some terrible squeeling noise to warn you the pump is dying. Other times people say it just stops working and they find their computer unstable and overheating, come to find out the pump stopped working because they don't feel any vibration in the hose.

It's rare for AIOS to leak, but it has happened. I honestly wouldn't expect one to consistently last longer than 5 years. Depending on the quality of the parts and luck of the draw of course.
 
OP
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NoahWL

New Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2016
Generally the only thing to break is the pump. If you're lucky you will hear some terrible squeeling noise to warn you the pump is dying. Other times people say it just stops working and they find their computer unstable and overheating, come to find out the pump stopped working because they don't feel any vibration in the hose.

It's rare for AIOS to leak, but it has happened. I honestly wouldn't expect one to consistently last longer than 5 years. Depending on the quality of the parts and luck of the draw of course.

Alright, that doesn't sound too bad as long as I make sure my CPU shuts down if it hits a certain temperature or something similar. I just thought of another question, is it okay to run the pump/system constantly? I rarely turn off my computer, usually only to do quick restarts.
 

Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
Yeah its fine to do that. Actually most mechanical things have a higher chance of breaking on startup rather than while they are running.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
I would stick to EK or Swiftech AIO's personally, they're much better in both quality and performance.
 

Tech Tweaker

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
I've been running my Corsair H100i for three years now. No problems so far, pump still runs at the same speed it always has (which is around 2300 RPM for this model).

And I used to almost never turn my system off, so it probably has a lot of run time on the pump.
 

Soulcatcher668

Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2012
FYI

NZXT warranty is 6 years
Corsair warranty is 5 years
Swiftech warranty is 3 years :(
EKWB warranty is 1 year 2 years :mad: Try and dig up that info on their site. Found at the bottom under tearms and Coditions. The other info was from NCIX.

IMHO, if you are going custom, go custom. If you are going AIO, go AIO.


*Edit to correct EKWB info.
 
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Evil-Mobo

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Location
MD
FYI

NZXT warranty is 6 years
Corsair warranty is 5 years
Swiftech warranty is 3 years :(
EKWB warranty is 1 year :mad: Try and dig up that info on their site.

IMHO, if you are going custom, go custom. If you are going AIO, go AIO.

Wow, thanks for this info.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Cryorig warranty is 6 years for all coolers including new AIO kits. That's 3 years basic warranty + 3 years when you register your product. I just installed Cryorig A80 in my gaming PC and I hope it will live long as I have enough of replacing parts in watercooling. Cryorig is using higher Asetek series components. Many popular AIO base on Asetek.

Most my pumps couldn't make more than 1-2 years and that includes 2 or 3 EK, Swiftech and couple of other brands. I just can't tell what is better or worse as everything I had was about as good.
 
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Joe88

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2013
Doesn't ek has a 2 year warranty?
in any event it depends on the quality on parts you want, performance, reliability, expandability, and generally how much you want to spend
 

Robert17

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
I've had 4 AIOs to date, starting with the H50 about 7-8 years ago; H60, H100i and TT water 3.0. I fold+ all else, so mine get a workout. Never a leak to date, H50 is still running in my grandson's PC, H60 became less efficient at about the 5 year mark and it's retired - maybe I'll dissect it and post up the autopsy....
 

Category 5

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
I had to use Corsair's warranty twice on my h100i. First time was for a noisy pump and the second time was for a broken fan jack (whole jack came out when I pulled the wire too hard without pressing the release). Both times Corsair sent me a brand new unit (shrink wrapped). First time I did an advanced replacement, and second time just a regular turn around. Both times were super fast. I've RMAd a power supply and memory before too and they were top notch as usual.

I buy a lot of Corsair products, mainly because their warranty and their handling of it is exceptional. Well worth the price IMO.
 

HankB

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
Beautiful Sunny Winfield
This thread is of particular interest to me as I have a refurb H110 inbound. FWIW it has a 1 year warranty. I guess that's one thing I give up in exchange for going with a refurb.

I'm curious about the TIM. I've looked at a couple videos about this unit and it looks like the TIM is a thick looking disk on the bottom of the pump. (Maybe 'thick' is just in my obsessive imagination. ;) ) Is it advisable to use that or should I be using something better?

I do have a suspicion that a lot of refurbs are excess stock that a company wants to get rid of cheap when a newer model is produced. I bought several refurb Sansa Clip MP3 players and I cannot imagine it being worth while refurbishing something like that unless it was as simple as replacing a broken housing.

Thanks!
 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
This thread is of particular interest to me as I have a refurb H110 inbound. FWIW it has a 1 year warranty. I guess that's one thing I give up in exchange for going with a refurb.

I'm curious about the TIM. I've looked at a couple videos about this unit and it looks like the TIM is a thick looking disk on the bottom of the pump. (Maybe 'thick' is just in my obsessive imagination. ;) ) Is it advisable to use that or should I be using something better?

I do have a suspicion that a lot of refurbs are excess stock that a company wants to get rid of cheap when a newer model is produced. I bought several refurb Sansa Clip MP3 players and I cannot imagine it being worth while refurbishing something like that unless it was as simple as replacing a broken housing.

Thanks!

Up to you. I've replaced the TIM on the Hxxx Corsair coolers with MX-4 and shed a few degrees tops or you could just stick with the stock TIM. Can I ask, where was this refurb bought? If from Newegg or Corsair themselves, I'm going on a limb here and guess that its the same TIM they use on their new products.
 

HankB

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
Beautiful Sunny Winfield
Can I ask, where was this refurb bought? If from Newegg or Corsair themselves, I'm going on a limb here and guess that its the same TIM they use on their new products.
Newegg Flash. It came up on SlickDeals.

It arrived today packaged in retail packaging complete with shrink-wrap. There is no 'refurbished' indication anywhere inside or out. I really do think this was overstock of the old model that Corsair or Newegg was blowing out.

The TIM doesn't look as thick as I had imagined.

thanks,
hank