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how many volts can a fan take??

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Since87

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2002
Location
Indiana
Trust me. It won't work long.

Most "12V" fans are rated to operate up to 15V. I'd always look for the manufacturer's specs though.
 

The Spyder

Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2002
Location
Oregon
how long did it last? Ive seen not work, some for 1sec then burn..... and upto a min before they burst into flames... :p
 

dxiw

Disabled
Joined
Feb 7, 2002
i tried that and increased to about 50 and then it just died. I had another running at 25v and it died after like a week.
 

Toysrme

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
Ok. Assuming the fact that the fan didn't burn up:
1) the sators could be damaged or broken
2) the fan assembly can pull off the hub.
3) ever thought about just burning the fan elecctronics/bearings/bushings.

-Toysrme
 
OP
Lt. Max

Lt. Max

Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2002
Location
Seattle, but im Estonian
toysorme u mean fan assembly can pull of hub cause its so powerful like a plane taking off ? or.. ? its not that powerful i mean its a 60mm fan .. mab putting out instead of 12cfm about 30-40 now
 

SHODAN

Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2002
Location
Citadel Station
I wired up a 92mm Nidec to a junk PS across various wires to test this out. It seemed fine at 15.3V (+3.3 to -12) for about half an hour. At 17V it got a little warm, but seemed to stabilize after a few minutes. At 24V, it continued to heat up, getting hot enough to burn with prolonged skin contact after a few minutes, and it hadn't stabilized yet.
 

Toysrme

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
Ok. We're gonna go above and beyond what your fan motor can do.

I don't think so, but the possibility is there that if given enough thrust over time that the hub assembly (what the blades connect to too connect with the fan) will produce enough thrust to just pull itself off the shaft of the motor. Personally I wouldn't risk it. I've been struck in the head with a large R/C propeller. The 4-stroke motor backfired due to too low of an idle speed and fuel starvation (my fault). The shaft spun backwards which unwinds the propeller off the shaft.
That has nothing to do with this, but the warning still stands. You would have to be using a computer fan which has more motor than the blades want to use. I bet it could be a concern with the fastest deltas if they were over volted too far and didn't burn up.

Bad things happen to spinning objects when they're spun faster than they're designed to do. In a worst case scenario which a computer fan motor couldn't pull off. The blades will shatter from G forces spewing fragments everywhere causing much destruction. (Think fragmentation grenade)
That has nothing to do with this also<g>. Just more worse case scenario.

So what I'm warning yall not to do is combine these fan hubs with any type of R/C electric or gas/glow motor, or any other type of higher output driving device that is more powerful than the stock motor the fan assembly comes off of.

What is neat is that some EDJ (Electric Ducted Fan's) can pull 1400+ watts and spin upwards of 35k RPM. If you want airflow<g> there ya go.

-Toysrme
 

MEAT BAG

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2002
Location
TX
Every fan i have seen has e-clips or something on the shaft holding the hub to the rest of the houseing. So i doubt the fan hub will just shoot off.
 

ChillPhatCat

Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2002
Location
Ballston Spa, NY
Toysrme said:
Ok. We're gonna go above and beyond what your fan motor can do.

I don't think so, but the possibility is there that if given enough thrust over time that the hub assembly (what the blades connect to too connect with the fan) will produce enough thrust to just pull itself off the shaft of the motor. Personally I wouldn't risk it. I've been struck in the head with a large R/C propeller. The 4-stroke motor backfired due to too low of an idle speed and fuel starvation (my fault). The shaft spun backwards which unwinds the propeller off the shaft.
That has nothing to do with this, but the warning still stands. You would have to be using a computer fan which has more motor than the blades want to use. I bet it could be a concern with the fastest deltas if they were over volted too far and didn't burn up.

Bad things happen to spinning objects when they're spun faster than they're designed to do. In a worst case scenario which a computer fan motor couldn't pull off. The blades will shatter from G forces spewing fragments everywhere causing much destruction. (Think fragmentation grenade)
That has nothing to do with this also<g>. Just more worse case scenario.

So what I'm warning yall not to do is combine these fan hubs with any type of R/C electric or gas/glow motor, or any other type of higher output driving device that is more powerful than the stock motor the fan assembly comes off of.

What is neat is that some EDJ (Electric Ducted Fan's) can pull 1400+ watts and spin upwards of 35k RPM. If you want airflow<g> there ya go.

-Toysrme

I've got a .61 CI engine on my plane swinging a 13x6 Prop... that'd do pretty nice... about 9 lbs of thrust :)
 

Toysrme

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
What about my Satio 180 swinging an APC 17 *6N <g> gives my 1/4 scale cap 232 unlimited vertical. <g>

-Toysrme

I'll give any other R/C buff mad props (pun) for being stupid if he'll crank a speed .45-.50 with ANY computer fan assembly on the drive shaft and then throttle up from a low idle. Just be sure you're operating it behind a concrete wall or one of Nasa's blast bunkers <g> Oh and take a video of it ROTFLAMO!

I bet no computer fan will make it past 10k. Delta might have a shot, but it's cheep plastic and it would ream out and just fly straight off. (Btw whoever tries it better do it with a Junker because you're gonna burn it up even using a rich fuel mixture because it won't have a load on it!)