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How to bleed?

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rack04

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2004
Location
Houston, TX
Can anyone provide some sort of guide to the best way to bleed a system? I am trying to learn all that I can before venturing into watercooling. I figure this way it will make things easier when all the parts are lying in front of me. Thanks.
 

Shuruga2

Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2002
Location
Ottawa, Canada
One of the popular ways right now is an air trap. This is a link to one a forum member has made -> Air Trap.

dont be afraid to deviate from that design and choose your own parts. i spent an hour at the harware store fitting pieces together until i was happy with mine.
 

Cyrix_2k

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2003
Location
Frederick, MD
I just use a good 'ol fashioned T-line. Simply put the "T" fitting right before the intake of your pump and use a funnel to fill the tube attached to the 90 degree part of the "T". Keep adding water till the system is filled. Then let the pump run and the micr-bubbles will slowly work their way out of the system. When the T-line tube gets low on water, fill it up again. It can take several days to work out all of the air in the system, but you can run your computer immediatly after you fill the system.
 

Cyrix_2k

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2003
Location
Frederick, MD
rack04 said:
Is this how it is typically done with a reservoir system?
Air trap or T-line? The Air-trap doesn't need a resivoir and neither does a T-line. The Air-trap bleeds the system very fast, but it impacts the overall flow of the system as well. The T-line bleeds slow, but doesn't impact flow much. It is also possible to submerge the pump in a bucket, bleed the system in the bucket, then close the system under water. Using this method, you have no resivoir OR T-line OR air-trap or Any opening in the system at all.
 

MuEagle05

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Location
N/A
Cyrix_2k said:
Air trap or T-line? The Air-trap doesn't need a resivoir and neither does a T-line. The Air-trap bleeds the system very fast, but it impacts the overall flow of the system as well. The T-line bleeds slow, but doesn't impact flow much. It is also possible to submerge the pump in a bucket, bleed the system in the bucket, then close the system under water. Using this method, you have no resivoir OR T-line OR air-trap or Any opening in the system at all.

You'd still need a reservoir or T-line to keep the system full. Water will, however slowly, evaporate out through the tubing.
 

Cyrix_2k

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2003
Location
Frederick, MD
MuEagle05 said:
You'd still need a reservoir or T-line to keep the system full. Water will, however slowly, evaporate out through the tubing.
Someone on these forums tried that method and reported their system didn't need to be topped off, even after 6 months of use.
 
OP
rack04

rack04

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2004
Location
Houston, TX
I guess I'm just confused on a method to remove all the bubbles from a reservoir system.
 

Moony349

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
With a resevoir, all you have to do is shake the system and maybe turn it over on itself a few times and the air should bleed itself out of the res.
 

BlueMan

Member
Joined
May 20, 2004
I don't understand how anyone who has secured their HC to their case could bleed the system withOUT tipping/rotating the case. The HC is a maze of pipes and air is bound to get caught in the tops of the pipes. Am I missing something? I just filled my system for the first time the other day and my res. is connected to the inlet of my pump, and bleeding was awful - I had to tip the whole damn box on its side and all these crazy angles, and every time I would get more and more air out of my HC (2-342).

I can't imagine an air trap would help this either, since the problem is the Hc, not the random bubbles.

any ideas?