• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

How to build a computer.

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Culbrelai

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Is there any particular safe way to hold a CPU?

The one part whose installation makes me the most anxious ... literally after CPU installation I think I've got everything else down...
 

Operant

Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Location
US
I just grab the sides and make sure hot to touch the top of the IHS or the contacts on the bottom. You should be fine otherwise (and of course do not touch the middle section of the underside).
 

I.M.O.G.

Glorious Leader
Joined
Nov 12, 2002
Location
Rootstown, OH
Is there any particular safe way to hold a CPU?

The one part whose installation makes me the most anxious ... literally after CPU installation I think I've got everything else down...

I would follow Operant's advice as best as possible. That said, I've manhandled my CPUs extensively. I try to hold them from the sides mostly when handling them, but I've also scrubbed the bottoms with isopropyl and a toothbrush, wiped the contacts with paper towels, and washed them off in the sink. I wouldn't recommend doing any of that, but really, the little CPU's aren't that fragile so once you get used to it I wouldn't be that scared to handle them.
 

Culbrelai

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
So just the edges, cool. That's what I figured. Thanks.

So basically, to install...

You lift that little latch, along with the little cover...

line up the notches/pins, and just push it in?

Then close the little latch, put TIM on the top of the CPU, then CPU cooler?

Seems simple enough.
 

Operant

Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Location
US
Do not push it in. Just drop it in basically. The notches should line up when you are dropping it in and it settles into place easily :)

Edit: Yeah, then you can lock it down with the clamp and then put tim on it and finally the cooler.
 

Culbrelai

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Okay. Heh, They say not to use force with computer components, which tends to be a lie with RAM... in my experience =P

Good to know, thanks. That should clear some anxiety for the final build day... Can't wait, I have archives I need to break into, I really should've written them down...
 

I.M.O.G.

Glorious Leader
Joined
Nov 12, 2002
Location
Rootstown, OH
Yup, thats accurate - its literally just a drop in. It doesn't push or snap into place - it sits securely in the socket if the notches are lined up.

To ensure I drop it in without bending any socket pins, I first put one corner of the CPU in the corner of the socket where there are no pins, and then I line up the notches and drop the CPU into the socket.

Once its in, you lower the retention bracket which presses down on the IHS of the CPU, then you lower the lever which applies more pressure and locks the retention bracket into place.

Having these sorts of details can help make you feel a little more confident the first time around. I remember it feeling more awkward in the past.

The only thing that can go wrong is bending socket pins. So you don't want to remove the protective socket cover on the motherboard until you are ready to install the CPU, and any time you remove the CPU it is best practice to replace the socket cover... It helps prevent any simple mistakes like fumbling something into the socket - bent pins. Or debris getting in the socket - bent pins. Intel is the worst with this the way their sockets are designed. AMD's got the pins on the CPU, and they too can be bent, but in my experience it happens less frequently, and when it does it is more easily fixed.
 

Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
If you don't have it aligned right when you drop it into the socket, don't push it around in said socket. Pick it back up, and try again. Pushing it around while it's sitting in there is a grand way to bend pins. Almost as good as accidentally dropping the CPU on it while doing something else.
The pins in the socket are fragile little things, and un-bending them is a major pain at best.
 

I.M.O.G.

Glorious Leader
Joined
Nov 12, 2002
Location
Rootstown, OH
Confirmed. I've bent pins by sliding the CPU into place when it didn't drop in just right on the first try. I've also unbent those pins, and it was a major pain to get right. Your eyes go crosseyed trying to focus and work with a specific pin.
 

Culbrelai

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Woah you guys are a storm of helpfulness, thx.

Unfortunately for my nerves and possibly lifespan, i have to do it twice -_-

I figured pins are the main fragile thing considering EVGA has found it neccesary to put a sticker on each CPU slot beholding my warranty will be void if any pins are bent :L
 

snowbrd

Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2010
EVGA can be a stickler for that. But other than that, their customer service is excellent. having a magnifying glass while unbending a pin or few does help a ton.
 

Zenos

New Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Location
CehNehDeh
The DVD burner could be optional as well couldn't it? I haven't used a optical drive in any of my own builds.
 

Ronbert

Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Location
La Crosse, WI
Confirmed. I've bent pins by sliding the CPU into place when it didn't drop in just right on the first try. I've also unbent those pins, and it was a major pain to get right. Your eyes go crosseyed trying to focus and work with a specific pin.

I've had this happen before, I actually posted a thread once where I received a 1090T from Newegg and the pins were bent when I opened the box. Long story short they blamed it on me so I just bent the pins back, cpu worked fine and held me over for a long time :thup:

EDIT: In fact HERE'S the thread.
 

Ethan McClard

New Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2013
Thanks it really helps!

Thanks Hopefully this will help me get started on build my new computer from scratch... :comp:
 

Gaarashatan

Registered
Joined
Mar 7, 2013
you should update it a bit. there are new cpu sockets. i also think you should mention that the cpu and mobo should have the same socket and the both only support certain capcity/speeds of ram. very nice guide i would never spend that much time XD