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How to create a vacum?

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FishDog3

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2001
What do I use to pump out the air inside a sealed pipe through a service valve, I am thinking about making a heat pipe.
 

cjtune

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
You'll need an industrial vacuum pump -not easy to get and operate...

BTW, how are you going to fill in the freon under vacuum? Won't it eveporate easily?
 

LimeyGreg

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Los Angeles
You can find vacuum pumps at McMaster-Carr or at any good air conditioning supplier, they aren't cheap, and the higher the vacuum they can pull the more expensive they are. You might try a scrap yard, I picked up one for $80, it's a brute but it sure works well on my vacuum oven.
 

LimeyGreg

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Los Angeles
Yes, vacuum oven. I repair flexible endoscopes, when I have the time, as a side job. They contain fiberoptic bundles for both light and vision as well as cables and wires. When a fluid invasion occurs it needs to be removed, not an easy task on a sheathed bundle of umpteen thousand fibers.

The oven runs at a fairly low temperature and the vacuum helps pull the moisture from the bundle as well as reducing it's evaporation point. The vacuum is cycled several times during the process and a final purge is done with helium (hygroscopic). It basically speeds up the drying process and helps minimize the staining that can occur in the image bundle during a lengthy drying period.

It's also useful for de-gassing adhesives and coatings prior to application. Another use is in mould making to remove bubbles from the casting and to accelerate curing.
 

Kingslayer

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2001
Location
Port Charlotte, Florida
LimeyGreg (Jul 11, 2001 08:43 p.m.):
Yes, vacuum oven. I repair flexible endoscopes, when I have the time, as a side job. They contain fiberoptic bundles for both light and vision as well as cables and wires. When a fluid invasion occurs it needs to be removed, not an easy task on a sheathed bundle of umpteen thousand fibers.

The oven runs at a fairly low temperature and the vacuum helps pull the moisture from the bundle as well as reducing it's evaporation point. The vacuum is cycled several times during the process and a final purge is done with helium (hygroscopic). It basically speeds up the drying process and helps minimize the staining that can occur in the image bundle during a lengthy drying period.

It's also useful for de-gassing adhesives and coatings prior to application. Another use is in mould making to remove bubbles from the casting and to accelerate curing.

Ummm....hehe....ahhhhh...hehe....hehe........He said gas!