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how to galvanize stuff?

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Agent_Mull

Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Location
Leawood, KS
I learned it science that by putting metal powder in a liquid and then charging the thing that you want to cover in metal, that the metal powder would attatch to the object. i have some cheap metal aluminium hs's that i want to give a good finish to. but i forget how to do this. Anyone know.
 

The_Jizzler

Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2003
galvanizing is usually used on steel and tin. i think your wanting anodizing, which is used alot on alumnum and steel. its not hard, just search for "anodizing" and im sure youll get hits.
 
OP
Agent_Mull

Agent_Mull

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Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Location
Leawood, KS
no not anodizing. Anodizing has to be done w/ expensive and dangerous chemicals, or is hard to do. electroplating is what i want. Anyways the hs is already anodized.
 
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ZachM

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2003
Powder coating is similar to that. They sell DIY kits, but you need an extra oven to cure it.
 

clocker2

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Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
If you're interested in making these "cheap aluminium HS' work their best I would recommend bead blasting them and not putting any finish at all on them.
They'll look pretty, too.
 
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Agent_Mull

Agent_Mull

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Oct 18, 2003
Location
Leawood, KS
b/c i want them to look good because they are blue annodized on top, and where i cut them w/ my hack saw (im missing the bit for my dremmel) its just rough metal.
 

rterrar

New Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Location
Oregon
I'm thinking that the easiest way would be to polish and smooth the cut parts, go to your local gun store and get some touch up bluing compound and follow the directions. The higher polish you have on it the better it will be. You won't get the blue anodized look but, a darker blue, done carefully I think this would come out pretty good.
 

CrashOveride

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2002
Location
Beijing, China
clocker2 said:
If you're interested in making these "cheap aluminium HS' work their best I would recommend bead blasting them and not putting any finish at all on them.
They'll look pretty, too.

But then they corrode quicker.
 

gusgizmo

Disabled
Joined
Aug 10, 2003
Location
Kona, Hawaii
ive never had any problems with aluminum corroding, i have an amd HSF, and i live in hawaii where stuff rusts overnight, so i dont see corrosion as a problem.
 

Susquehannock

The Mad Smelter
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Location
Maryland, USA
Agent_Mull said:
no not anodizing. Anodizing has to be done w/ expensive and dangerous chemicals, or is hard to do. electroplating is what i want. Anyways the hs is already anodized.


That's a common misconception.
Actually, the two processes are very similar in that both rely on
an direct electrolytic bond to the metal surface. Therfore, you
cannot put one over the other.

Anodize =
"To coat (a metallic surface) electrolytically with a protective or decorative oxide."

Galvanize =
1) To stimulate or shock with an electric current.
2) To arouse to awareness or action; spur: “Issues that once galvanized the electorate fade into irrelevance” (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).
3) To coat (iron or steel) with rust-resistant zinc.


source: Dictionary.com
 
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The_Jizzler

Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2003
anodizing is super cheap and fairly easy to do. a litlle battery acid, some water, a few electrodes and some dc power!
 

Susquehannock

The Mad Smelter
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Location
Maryland, USA
One more point ...

Acid is still often used to "super clean" and
etch the surface of the metal to enhance bonding.

In general, the more modern anodization methods typically use a dry
electrically charged powder over the older liquid
(usually acidic) bath process.
 
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Agent_Mull

Agent_Mull

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Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Location
Leawood, KS
My dad just bought some bluing for his beneli. But im pretty sure bluing is the Anodization equvilent of steel.
 
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Agent_Mull

Agent_Mull

Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Location
Leawood, KS
Yeah. I just looke @ the bottle of blue and it can not blue stainless steel, or aluminum. I think bluing is basically a controlled rust or chemical reaction of the metal that only works w/ steel.
 

Susquehannock

The Mad Smelter
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Location
Maryland, USA
Re: metal Bluing ...

Ahhh ... metals are my specialty. :D

There are a few types of metal bluing processes.
Not to be confused with PARKERIZING,
also called "Phosphatizing" or "Phosphate Coating"
which is a matted rust-resistant oxide finish, usually gray
or gray-green in color, found on military guns.

Bluing:
A) A method of coating ferrous metals with a thin, even film of bluish-black oxide, obtained by exposure to an atmosphere of dry steam or air, at a temperature of about 1000 0øF. Generally this is done during box-annealing. Bluing of tempered spring steel strip.
B) An oxide film blue in color produced by low temperature heating. The chemical oxidation to color ferrous metal parts various shades of blue or black.


Browning is another term often misused to incorrectly
denote bluing.

Heat bluing is generally by far the most durable.
This can be achieved in a hot oven or by heating electrically.
But many don't have the means to heat their part in these
manners. In those cases a chemical type bluing method is
preferable.

These blue colored compounds that come in a bottle are
sometimes refered to as "Pseudo Bluing" since it's only
a dye coating combined with a mild acid to etch and/or
oxidize the surface.

There are other more complicated and modern Bluing processes,
but I've wasted enough of your time already. ;)