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I7 12700K temps

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Surax

New Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2022
Hello there, I'm new to this forum and I recently built my first desktop computer (always used high level laptops before). Below are my complete specs:
Case: Phanteks Evolv X
MoBo: Aorus Z690 Master
CPU: I7 12700K
Ram: G.Skill Trident Z5 5600Mhz CL36 2x16GB (DDR5 Rams of course)
PSU: Seasonic TX-1000
GPU: RTX 3080Ti FE
Storage: Samsung 980 Pro 2TB + Samsung 960 Evo 2TB
Cooling: custom loop featuring a 420mm and a 280mm rads (in parallel). Only CPU has been watercooled at the moment, i'll watercool also the GPU when i have decided if i want to sell it and buy something else or not. Oh, I used the Arctic MX5 between CPU IHS and Waterblock. Also, every fan in the case is a 140mm Noctua IPPC 3000.

The fact is running cinebench ON STOCK settings I'm having temps like 73/75 degrees on a beefy custom loop (attaching photo so you can clearly see it). I want to understand if they are normal temperatures or not, since I'm not getting it. Some reviewers talks about 80 degs temps on heavily OCed 12700k, but if i set everything to 5GHz (without touching Vcore offset), i reach 85/86 degrees. Ok, the silicon lottery is a thing, but it seems a bit strange. Someone else talk about even 95 degrees on a Noctua NH-D15. So, I'm a bit confused. Can you please clarify me?
 

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Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Sometimes I don't get how others have so low temps, but often it's because they are not using FPU (AVX) tests. Many reviewers are pretty clueless but I won't comment on that.

Because of quite small dies, there is no big difference if you are using a single rad or two or more. Even single, slim 360 rad in theory handles 300W of heat. The problem is to transfer that heat fast enough from a small die. The water temperature won't be below ambient and while idle, you probably have maybe 25°C, regardless if you use 1,2,+ rads. The main advantage of having more rads is that fans can spin slower to generate less noise.

In the last few days, I was testing 12900K on a fresh build with a custom loop and thick 360 rad. Under full load, it was very close to the throttling point which is 100°C - 4.9GHz with AVX, 5.2GHz without. I could overclock it at 5.4GHz for tests but it wasn't fully stable. Slightly worse results were on 360 AIO but max OC was about the same.
I was also testing 12600K on various coolers and I can say that I like these CPUs much more because of better power/performance balance. I didn't have 12700K in my hands but it heats up slightly less than the 12900K so your temps seem pretty good.
Noctua U12A performs almost the same as NH-D15 and 12900K could reach nearly 100°C under full load, so yes, 95°C is about right for the NH-D15.

One more thing. I don't know what about now but Z690 Master on earlier BIOS was causing the CPU to run at higher temps than for example ASUS or ASRock. I have the Master in my gaming PC but I wasn't checking temps on a newer BIOS as I'm using 12600K at auto which isn't really hot, no matter what I do.
 
OP
S

Surax

New Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2022
Sometimes I don't get how others have so low temps, but often it's because they are not using FPU (AVX) tests. Many reviewers are pretty clueless but I won't comment on that.

Because of quite small dies, there is no big difference if you are using a single rad or two or more. Even single, slim 360 rad in theory handles 300W of heat. The problem is to transfer that heat fast enough from a small die. The water temperature won't be below ambient and while idle, you probably have maybe 25°C, regardless if you use 1,2,+ rads. The main advantage of having more rads is that fans can spin slower to generate less noise.

In the last few days, I was testing 12900K on a fresh build with a custom loop and thick 360 rad. Under full load, it was very close to the throttling point which is 100°C - 4.9GHz with AVX, 5.2GHz without. I could overclock it at 5.4GHz for tests but it wasn't fully stable. Slightly worse results were on 360 AIO but max OC was about the same.
I was also testing 12600K on various coolers and I can say that I like these CPUs much more because of better power/performance balance. I didn't have 12700K in my hands but it heats up slightly less than the 12900K so your temps seem pretty good.
Noctua U12A performs almost the same as NH-D15 and 12900K could reach nearly 100°C under full load, so yes, 95°C is about right for the NH-D15.

One more thing. I don't know what about now but Z690 Master on earlier BIOS was causing the CPU to run at higher temps than for example ASUS or ASRock. I have the Master in my gaming PC but I wasn't checking temps on a newer BIOS as I'm using 12600K at auto which isn't really hot, no matter what I do.
First of all, thank you for the answer.
Secondly, i know having 2 rads is useless, i just wanted to make things bigger! I always dreamt about a desktop and finally i decided to save money and build a oversized loop. Since I have no experience in desktop builds (except assembling for friends, but never experimented on them), I wanted to ask and understand if temperatures were normal. I supposed the main bottleneck was the heat trasnfer between IHS and the liquid itself, and you just gave me a confirmation, thank you very much!
Talking about the Aorus master, I updated few days ago, if i'm not wrong it was the 0.8 version, or something like that, but changelog mentioned just more ddr5 stability.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
There is F8d BIOS already but I wasn't changing since F7c. There are still problems with memory above 6000, especially G.Skill. ADATA works better for me. I think that soon there will be a new microcode as MSI already released a new beta for upcoming CPUs.