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i7 4790K OC Question

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Sp00kY

New Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
I just picked up a i7 4790K and have been working on overclocking it. I have a stable (so far, 1 hour stress in AIDA64) running 4.6ghz on all cores at 1.312v.

From what I have researched, 1.312v is a pretty safe voltage level for this chip. However, I thought maybe I could try dropping it down a little bit (although probably won't go much lower) until it is unstable.

Problem is on my motherboard, if I set it to ANYTHING (tried 1.25, 1.3, etc) it automatically ramps up to 1.312v when AIDA64 is running.

I have tried both the adaptive and auto core voltage settings in the BIOS but regardless it still tops out at 1.312v when stressing. I obviously don't want to leave this on override mode as I don't want my voltage constantly running that high.

Any thoughts on this? Thank you guys in advance.

Here are my specs and temperatures I was able to obtain:

Intel i7 4790K @ 4.6ghz (all cores) 1.312v peak.
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO / Arctic Silver 5 TP
MSI Z87-G45 Gaming Motherboard (latest BIOS and chipset installed)
8GB (2x4gb) G Skill DDR3 1600 (dual channel, XMP profile enabled)

AIDA64 Stability Test
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Bisquit

Member
Joined
May 19, 2011
Location
Amsterdam, Holland
Your average is 1.292 which seems in line with what you set in bios. Maximum could be a very short burst which most chips will experience.
Without a fixed vcore you have to accept it can shoot up and down for a brief instant.
If I run p95 my vcore will sit around 1.290 most of the time, monitored by cpuz. If I run a game however, the vcore will shoot to 1.325.
Same can be experienced with running prime blend or small fft's, there will be a vcore difference between both tests.
Anyway, better to use msi AB with its ingame display of temps and voltages, or cpuz for desktop benches.