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i7 920 Vs. Q8xxx or Q9xxx

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tomasgi

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
I'm a little confused on the actual diff between Intel's i7s and Q8 or 9 series. When I was building my rig, I was told by a computer repair shop in my town that the i7 920 only had 15% more performance power then my Q8200. I know this to be false since my Q8200 only has a multiplier of 7:rain: and the i7 is like a million;). But I haven't found any good VS. reviews that can really persuade me to drop another 600$ for a i7 920 and a new MOBO.
Can anyone tell me what the diff is or post a good link?

Thanks in advanced!
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
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Dec 15, 2008
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Buckeyes!

kkpudge7

Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2008
Location
Michigan
The i7 is a quad core chip that has hyper threading, which means it has 8 working threads. Whereas the Qx and 9x chips are just quad cores. One of the big draws to the i series chips is how well they overclock, I had a Q9450 that I worked with for about a year, and I hit an absolute wall @ 3.6Ghz because of the multiplier being locked at 8x. Since the i7 has a 21x multiplier (among other things an entirely new structure for memory and cache management) it is able to hit much higher clocks at much lower voltages. Ive hit 4.3Ghz on air with my i7 and a minute 1.35v, and I dont consider myself by any means an expert overclocker.

Others here have gotten the chip up near 4.5-4.8 Ghz on water. The main issue is what are you going to be doing with the rig? i7 really shines on multi-GPU stations, and video encoding :)
 

Brolloks

Benching Senior on Siesta, Premium Member #8
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Location
Land of Long Horns
There are huge differences between the i7 series and Q8/Q9 quads.

The motherboards they run on are completely different with a different socket, LGA 775 vs LGA 1366/LGA 1156 for the i7.

The i7 motherboards come in two flavors, X58 and P55, you can see in this link which i7 CPU runs on what board. http://processorfinder.intel.com/List.aspx?ParentRadio=All&ProcFam=3052&SearchKey=

The i7 CPU all are quads but also has Hyperthreading which gives you 8 threads instead of the 4 that the Q9/Q8 quads have.

The X58 boards hosts DDR3 only and has tri-channel RAM, the P-series boards (P35, P45 and P55) only has dual channel RAM where P55 only has DDR3, you have DDR3 or DDR2 in the P35 and P45 boards.

The whole architechture and way you run and OC the i7 series is so much different to the previous generation LGA 775 platform.

The i7 is certainly faster in many aspects, by how much it depends on many factors, how much you OC it, what benchmark or app you use, do you enable HT or not, etc etc. The i7 CPU's runs much cooler as well than the its predecessors, and it OC's much higher.

Hope this helps a bit, I can probably write 5 pages on this but this is just a brief overview :)
 
OP
tomasgi

tomasgi

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Well the multiplier has very little to do with performance first of all. ;)

But second, if your system is working for you, then dont worry about it.

There are reviews all around. Here is one of them (X3350 is Q9450 BTW which is a hair faster than your chip): http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.p...sk=view&id=254&Itemid=63&limit=1&limitstart=5

List from Google: http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4ADBR_enUS316US316&q=i7+920+reviews

I've seen most of the reviews for the i7 but whats the real diff. I'm very happy with my system but there's always new and better toys out there. Also I'm moving to Argentina in March and technology down there is double or some times triple what it is in the USA. So it's more of a I want it now since I might want it in the future kind of thing:D. The real question i guess is is it really THAT much better the the Qs?
 
OP
tomasgi

tomasgi

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The i7 is a quad core chip that has hyper threading, which means it has 8 working threads. Whereas the Qx and 9x chips are just quad cores. One of the big draws to the i series chips is how well they overclock, I had a Q9450 that I worked with for about a year, and I hit an absolute wall @ 3.6Ghz because of the multiplier being locked at 8x. Since the i7 has a 21x multiplier (among other things an entirely new structure for memory and cache management) it is able to hit much higher clocks at much lower voltages. Ive hit 4.3Ghz on air with my i7 and a minute 1.35v, and I dont consider myself by any means an expert overclocker.

Others here have gotten the chip up near 4.5-4.8 Ghz on water. The main issue is what are you going to be doing with the rig? i7 really shines on multi-GPU stations, and video encoding :)

Well eventually I want 2x GTX 295 :D, I do some gaming and a LOT of multitasking.

There are huge differences between the i7 series and Q8/Q9 quads.

The motherboards they run on are completely different with a different socket, LGA 775 vs LGA 1366/LGA 1156 for the i7.

The i7 motherboards come in two flavors, X58 and P55, you can see in this link which i7 CPU runs on what board. http://processorfinder.intel.com/List.aspx?ParentRadio=All&ProcFam=3052&SearchKey=

The i7 CPU all are quads but also has Hyperthreading which gives you 8 threads instead of the 4 that the Q9/Q8 quads have.

The X58 boards hosts DDR3 only and has tri-channel RAM, the P-series boards (P35, P45 and P55) only has dual channel RAM where P55 only has DDR3, you have DDR3 or DDR2 in the P35 and P45 boards.

The whole architechture and way you run and OC the i7 series is so much different to the previous generation LGA 775 platform.

The i7 is certainly faster in many aspects, by how much it depends on many factors, how much you OC it, what benchmark or app you use, do you enable HT or not, etc etc.

Hope this helps a lot, I can probably write 5 pages on this but this is just a brief overview :)

Thanks! My Q8200 is crap:eh?: I'm really gonna have to pull some mulla out of my A$$ and upgrade be for I leave!:D

Thanks guys that really helps!
 

MattNo5ss

5up3r m0d3r4t0r
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
i7 really outshines the Q8/9xxx in 3-4 GPU setups (X58), video encoding, and math intensive programs. For basic computer use and 1-2 GPU gaming setups you prolly won't notice a dramatic difference.
 

Brolloks

Benching Senior on Siesta, Premium Member #8
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Location
Land of Long Horns
OK, before you move down to the jungles of Argetina (just kidding), get yourself a nice i7-920, three sticks of 2 GB DDR3 and a decent X58 boards and you will be set for a few years unless you tech crazy like me and a few others here.

this should set you back no more that say $500 :)

Oh and don;'t waste money on getting 2x GTX 295, get one HD 5870 and you can play all the games you want at max :)
 

Brutal-Force

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
There are numerous improvements on the i3/i5/i7 series that would give you better results than what you currently own. But as always, the deciding factor is going to be what do you do with your computer. The old question of "if you game" vs. "video encoding/multi-tasking" remains.

Your Q8200 was never a very good overclocker in my opinion due to its limiting multipliers, when coupled with your current Mobo, which from my understanding was also limiting. The fact that you run at stock tells me that you also are not interested in overclocking, which is good. For what it is Q8200 is a quiet/cool running CPU designed for the masses. Only the Q6XXX series was slower, yet due to its multipliers, the Q6600 was a much better overclocker.

Now for the i7. There are two variations on both the LGA 1156 boards and the 1366 boards. The former are more inexpensive by about 100-200 dollars and use dual channel DDR3 Ram set ups while the Later have a "better (take this with a grain of salt)" upgrade path but have a tripple channel DDR3 set up that requires 3 Ram Modules to operate, effectively making the ram more expensive too because you have 3 sticks instead of two.

Now for performance. When running stock, the i7 has 4 Cores, much like your Q8200 but it also has 2 Virtual Cores (Threads) per Core totaling 8 Threads instead of 4. This gives it a leg up on Applications requiring multiple cores/threads such as Video Encoding software. Currently though, I would say since we don't really fully utilize such a chip for day to day use, it may be overkill for you, but this performance is much much more than 15% gain. Another factor is that these chips come build in with what Intel calls Turbo Boost technology. What this allows is a jump in Clock speed on 1 or 2 cores. Without overclocking, this gives you a 3.2 clock speed over the stock 2.6GHz without changing any of your settings. This is an intel build in technology. So right there you are getting a 30% performance gain. If you did decide to overclock, these chips are capable of speeds between 4.0 and 4.4 GHz, but more often 4.0 whereas your Q8200 would probably limit you to 3.2-3.4GHz.

The i5 series or i7 on the LGA 1156 Platform is less expensive but with the same performance with the i7s, while the i5 only has 4 cores with no Hyper Threading (virtual cores). It also has hyperthreading and can overclock to 4.0-4.2GHz. It also only has two sticks of ram vs. 3 which can be a 50 dollar savings.

If gaming is your thing, then you can go with the i3-i5 series on the LGA 1156. They have Dual Core with hyperthreading 2 cores (with two virtual cores). They are wonderful overclockers. Speeds of 4.5 are not unheard of on a Good Air Heatsink and fan. These are at least on par with the best and fastest dual core processors but the addition of the hyperthreading helps when your are actually using the cpu for video encoding (not as much as a Quad core, but enough to make a difference).

Whatever you choose, there are defintely performance gains. I myself upgraded from the Q6600 to the i5 750 and I see a performance gain of about 30% through bench tests. For real world performance the improvement is not so visible, the Q6600 was already fast, however the Q6600 was a hot running processor, so under full load it warmed up my room.

In the end only you can decide what is right for you, but I hope this helped you make your decision.
 

Brolloks

Benching Senior on Siesta, Premium Member #8
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Location
Land of Long Horns
The 1366 is future proof and he is looking for that, it is also a stronger platform than the 1156, no doubt.
 
OP
tomasgi

tomasgi

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Whatchya need 2 gtx 295's for? You bench a lot? Have a 30" monitor?
I'm an addict man! my 3dmark v gave a ****ty score so I want to blow that damn benchmark out of the water! Seriously I do some gaming like 4-5 hours a week all on PC and when I play I like to see the best graphics. And I have my 24' LCD and 2x 22' LCD that I some times use.
OK, before you move down to the jungles of Argetina (just kidding), get yourself a nice i7-920, three sticks of 2 GB DDR3 and a decent X58 boards and you will be set for a few years unless you tech crazy like me and a few others here.

this should set you back no more that say $500 :)

Oh and don;'t waste money on getting 2x GTX 295, get one HD 5870 and you can play all the games you want at max :)

I was thinking this MOBo and the i7 920 for $290.
Also wouldn't 2 GTX 295 guarantee me a few years of max res on future games. Got to add this. I play all my games on 3d and one GPU is not enough. I play crysis w/o 3d at 35-37 FPS I add the 3d and it drops to 20fps
 
Last edited:

Neuromancer

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Location
Tau'ri
E758 is a very strong board. Have needle nose handle to plug in the CPU power and CPU fan header.

I would retim the chipsets if you intend to do any overclocking, made a nice difference for me.

A Massive massive heatsink is recommended for the i7 if you intend to do ANY overclocking at all.

Unfortunately RAM doubled in price over the last few months. So that will be an added expense unfortunately.
 
OP
tomasgi

tomasgi

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
the 5870 is a much better value
But my nvidia 3d vision does not support that card only Nvidia GPUs :-/

E758 is a very strong board. Have needle nose handle to plug in the CPU power and CPU fan header.

I would retim the chipsets if you intend to do any overclocking, made a nice difference for me.

A Massive massive heatsink is recommended for the i7 if you intend to do ANY overclocking at all.

Unfortunately RAM doubled in price over the last few months. So that will be an added expense unfortunately.

I'm definitely gonna OC I'm getting all my components for my first water loop today -fans those are coming in a week. I already thought ahead too and got a 1156 adapter for my Apogee water block:D
 

Brutal-Force

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Brolloks, I know the 1366 is future proof, but in reality, if he is a tech junky, then 1156 would be a cheaper option, since he will probably graduate to another platform in 2 years anyways. That being said, he may also lose interest in gaming all together in two years in which case a i7860 would be enough anyways. I hardly think that the 6-core processor will ever be used in mainstream within the next 5 years. Hell they still sell dual cores all day for general PC Population. Almost everyone I have even spoken to does not even know Quadcores exist and that Dual Cores have been out for a few years. Wiki says ~Jan 06. Core2Duo and Core2Quads in Jul06 and Jan07. That being said, if Duals have only been around for 3-4 years mainstream, Quads a little less, I would say its safe to say that technically software is probably AT LEAST that far behind. Software programmers are now starting to take advantage of this in newer games and applications. Even then Benchmarking shows that AMDs tripple core is sufficient to handle most apps and games, giving Intel a leg up having an extra core for doing things like running a virus program.

Its not that I am saying it wouldn't be nice to have a Six Core processor, I am just saying that today it is extreme overkill (nothing more than bragging rights) because for everyday use you will never fully utilize it unless you Fold or use it for Commercial use. Hell you can almost say the same thing for Quad cores. I rarely see my CPU utilize more than 2 cores at 10% unless I am benching.

Tomasagi, at this point in the game... go with something that will clock to at least 4.0 with at least 3 or more cores. Even a i3 with 2 cores and 4 virtual cores will get you by. Although benches show 4 actual cores are better. I saw a deal for Mobo and i3 530 for 184 dollars at Microcenter. Ram you could pick up here on classies or from new egg for ~60-80 dollars. That would definitely overclock better than a Q8200, but if you HAD to go Quad, you could get a i5 750 and Mobo for 250ish.

Just trying to lay out all options.