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I'm a little on the fence about buying this. Can people offer tips?

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Neostarwcc

Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2013
Location
Ottawa, ON
Okay so, I just installed my Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500GB the other day. I moved some files to it (specifically World Of Warcraft and a few other files) I run the files and a few programs for monitoring my HDD's because one of them is on the failing side and I noticed that all three programs I installed (Crystaldiskinfo,HWmonitor, and Diskcheckup.) showed my temps at between 60 and 65C when I ran the programs and WoW at the same time. Which are apparently dangerous temperatures that would destroy my drive quite quickly (Apparently a year or less).

So I went to Toms Hardware with this problem and they told me that all NVME drives are running on the hot side and that my main problem is sticking a video game on my SSD and that's why It's running so hot. So, I tried moving World of Warcraft to my 250GB 840 EVO on their recommendation ran it, and my temps on the 970 evo plus were still in the 40-45C range. Which... is bad isn't it for just running pretty much completely idle and just running windows? As most of my other drives run at less than 10C while idle. Also when I'm putting the 840 EVO under a larger load than I put my 970 EVO Plus It's still running at a healthy 25-29C. So... what's the problem here?


Now to my main question. I was going to buy a 2TB 970 EVO Plus when I had the money for extra storage and because I wanted to stick several games on it for increased performance (Because despite the temperature issues WoW does run BEAUTIFULLY on my 970 EVO plus. Quite fast.) but, if all of my NVME drives are going to do the same thing what's the point in even owning one? Sure windows boots up in 2 seconds and my games run lightning fast but if they're going to blow up in less than a year under minor workload... what's the point in owning one? Am I missing something? Should I take the plate off and see if that cools it down (I'm using a ASUS Prime z390-A motherboard)? I have proper airflow going on in my case I believe. I just don't get why it's running hot unless toms hardware is right and It's a manufacturer error with all NVME SSDs. In which case it'd be extremely stupid of me to buy a 2TB drive.
 

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
I think you might be stressing a little more than necessary here. Yes excessive heat can and will shorten the life span of your NVMe. With that said the temps that are responsible for that are in the 85°+C range. These NVMe drives are generally designed to withstand 65-70°C without degradation. They are also designed to thermal throttle to keep from damaging themselves. With that said if you're seeing temps in the 40-45°C range than you have nothing to be concerned about. Looking at you motherboard layout it does look like you could have restricted airflow over the SSD heatsink if you are running dual GPU's, but if you only have a single GPU mounted in the top PCIe slot you shouldn't have any worries.

If you are still concerned, there are aftermarket heatsinks that will out perform your stock ASUS one. The best ones that I've read about are the Silverstone TP02-M2 and the Aquacomputer KryoM.2.
 

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
There's two parts to the SSDs in general, never mind if they are NVMe or SATA. There is the controller, and there is the flash. The flash apparently actually likes warmer temperatures in normal operation, but there is an upper limit still. The controller gets hot under load, and it may throttle if it gets too hot resulting in lower performance. If using heatsinks, it is best to only contact the controller.

I've had one SSD go bad on me in use, and on investigation afterwards I found it was because it overheated. The M.2 slot on the mobo was right under the GPU slot, and I had the GPU running 24/7 folding at the time. Temps were over 70C which I think was the drive's rated maximum. I had data corruption, although after allowing it to cool and refreshed the OS install, it is working fine again. I now use it elsewhere away from the GPU.
 
OP
Neostarwcc

Neostarwcc

Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2013
Location
Ottawa, ON
I think you might be stressing a little more than necessary here. Yes excessive heat can and will shorten the life span of your NVMe. With that said the temps that are responsible for that are in the 85°+C range. These NVMe drives are generally designed to withstand 65-70°C without degradation. They are also designed to thermal throttle to keep from damaging themselves. With that said if you're seeing temps in the 40-45°C range than you have nothing to be concerned about. Looking at you motherboard layout it does look like you could have restricted airflow over the SSD heatsink if you are running dual GPU's, but if you only have a single GPU mounted in the top PCIe slot you shouldn't have any worries.

If you are still concerned, there are aftermarket heatsinks that will out perform your stock ASUS one. The best ones that I've read about are the Silverstone TP02-M2 and the Aquacomputer KryoM.2.

I think you might be stressing a little more than necessary here. Yes excessive heat can and will shorten the life span of your NVMe. With that said the temps that are responsible for that are in the 85°+C range. These NVMe drives are generally designed to withstand 65-70°C without degradation. They are also designed to thermal throttle to keep from damaging themselves. With that said if you're seeing temps in the 40-45°C range than you have nothing to be concerned about. Looking at you motherboard layout it does look like you could have restricted airflow over the SSD heatsink if you are running dual GPU's, but if you only have a single GPU mounted in the top PCIe slot you shouldn't have any worries.

If you are still concerned, there are aftermarket heatsinks that will out perform your stock ASUS one. The best ones that I've read about are the Silverstone TP02-M2 and the Aquacomputer KryoM.2.




Perhaps. I mean my temps while running a game off of it were between 60 and 68C. Now that I moved WoW off of the drive and stuck it on my 840 EVO it ran cooler (40-45c) for a while but afterwards it rose up to 60-65c again. So maybe it IS my video card that's causing it to heat up because why would a SSD get that hot just loading windows? Windows 10 isn't really that extensive of an operating system. But then again, you can play world of warcraft on full settings on a microwave oven too. So... idk...

Don't even get me started on that front though. I've been super pissed at ASUS since August pretty much. I got stiffed with a motherboard where two of my PCI-E slots don't work and only the middle one does. So I'm stuck placing my already very hot GPU (65-70c while gaming) on top of the NVME heatsink so that could be why it can't function properly. Especially when it's already being covered by something really hot. But the RTX 2080 Super tends to run on the hot side with a stock cooler. Nothing can be done about that atm. I've tried calling ASUS about the problem too and they said that it was my fault for installing the GPU incorrectly. If they said that I installed the NVME SSD incorrectly, I would have believed them as this SSD was my very first installation. I hadn't even heard of NVME SSD's until like 3-4 months ago. But I've probably installed thousands of PCI-E video cards in my life. I know how to do it, it isn't hard. You line up the card with the holes and you slowly and gently push down until you hear a click and then you screw it in. Not hard. I KNOW It's ASUS's fault and I installed it correctly.

I might look into one of your heatsinks they're VERY inexpensive and if it'll lengthen the lifespan of my SSD until I can afford to spend a $400 bill on a bigger one than so be it.


Honestly? I should probably just save up someday and stick my whole rig on water. I had none of these issues when I ran my rig on water and I honestly don't know what made me stop. Maybe that it was a pain in the *** to have to keep filling it up every like week or so and that the water was toxic so you couldn't get it in your skin or eyes or anything so you had to be extra careful. I think I spilled water into my case one time too and blew a power supply box one time doing that too. So yeah... I can be extra careful for the reward. Besides I have to fill my bipap machine with new distilled water nearly every single night anyway. I could get used to it.

- - - Auto-Merged Double Post - - -

There's two parts to the SSDs in general, never mind if they are NVMe or SATA. There is the controller, and there is the flash. The flash apparently actually likes warmer temperatures in normal operation, but there is an upper limit still. The controller gets hot under load, and it may throttle if it gets too hot resulting in lower performance. If using heatsinks, it is best to only contact the controller.

I've had one SSD go bad on me in use, and on investigation afterwards I found it was because it overheated. The M.2 slot on the mobo was right under the GPU slot, and I had the GPU running 24/7 folding at the time. Temps were over 70C which I think was the drive's rated maximum. I had data corruption, although after allowing it to cool and refreshed the OS install, it is working fine again. I now use it elsewhere away from the GPU.


That sounds like what's going to happen to me in the future. Maybe I should save up $300 within the next 3-4 months and try to go with a better motherboard. (Read above as to why my motherboard just won't work if this is happening.)
 

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
So, sifting through this mini rant I'm not sure how water cooling is going to cool down your NVMe SSD. Not that a water cooling block on an M.2 drive would be impossible, I just haven't seen it done......yet.

So again, your temps are within the manufacturers design intent. even up to 68°C you are fine. I would however look into swapping out that faulty motherboard somehow. ASUS can be a very difficult company to deal with for sure. There are plenty of ASUS ranting threads here and elsewhere on the interwebs. Please, lets not turn this thread into that too. Any chance you can get your retailer to exchange the motherboard?
 
OP
Neostarwcc

Neostarwcc

Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2013
Location
Ottawa, ON
So, sifting through this mini rant I'm not sure how water cooling is going to cool down your NVMe SSD. Not that a water cooling block on an M.2 drive would be impossible, I just haven't seen it done......yet.

So again, your temps are within the manufacturers design intent. even up to 68°C you are fine. I would however look into swapping out that faulty motherboard somehow. ASUS can be a very difficult company to deal with for sure. There are plenty of ASUS ranting threads here and elsewhere on the interwebs. Please, lets not turn this thread into that too. Any chance you can get your retailer to exchange the motherboard?



I didn't know you couldn't cool off SSD's with water. I thought maybe you could. But, maybe I should save up for it so that I can do some overclocking maybe? Maybe. It's a thought.

Maybe not, I apologize for the rant too. I've just been angry at ASUS for selling me a faulty board for a while though. I've tried getting them to swap out the board and they won't because they say it was my fault the other slots are damaged. I mean, I've bought ASUS products almost my entire life, they're a fantastic company and make fantastic motherboards and whatnot but their customer support kinda sucks. So anyway, to figure this out one option I have is buying a better board? Could you recommend some good LGA1151(300 series) motherboards to me for maybe overclocking in the future? I know the motherboard that I have now, I have better chances at Wile catching the roadrunner than I have of getting some overclocking done. So maybe a good overclocking board from ASUS like this one?

https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813132967


Or is that too expensive compared to similar/better boards? I'm willing to go off the ASUS train if I could find a good motherboard that would last me a while. I have just had almost zero luck with other motherboard manufacturers. Like Gigabyte for example, I haven't had a gigabyte board last me longer than a few months. That and ASROCK.

I also have one question that toms hardware seemed to gloss over and never answer. If my Hard Drive did die to heat would Samsung replace it? Or would they call it negligence on my part and not coverable under my warranty? Since I should have taken the steps to prevent it from dying due to heat? I'd hate to be on the hook for another $120 drive when I could have spent less than that preventing the problem from happening in the first place.

Also if I do install a new one of those heatsinks would I void my warranty with Samsung? Curious.
 
Last edited:

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
No need to apologise. We've all been frustrated by one or more companies. ASUS seems to be the most common in the last 2-3 years so know that your frustrations are not unwarranted.

That ROG motherboard is way overkill for your uses. It's really geared more towards the extreme overclockers. By that I mean the types of guys that are on our competitive benchmarking team that regularly overclock their rigs and cool them with liquid nitrogen or dry ice. The board you have should be capable of a decent overclock for 24/7 use. If you do decide to replace your board and choose to avoid ASUS, Gigabyte, and ASRock then MSI would be the way to go. The MSI MAG Z390 Tomahawk would be about the right board for an air cooled overclocker.

A side note on your ASUS Prime Z390-A, running the GPU in the second slot will only run at the x8 lane mode instead of the x16 lanes. For me this alone would be reason to replace it. Even if ASUS or the store you bought it from refuses to warranty it (which would suck).


Finally, and more on the actual topic, IF your SSD were to die while under warranty and under the conditions you described above then I don't see how Samsung wouldn't cover the warranty. It's not overheating (per manufacturers specs), under a heatsink, and it's within it's warranty lifetime. The only way I could see them not covering it is if you were unable to prove purchase, was physically damaged, or something of that nature.