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I'm gonna keep asking this till you guys give me an answer

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timmyqwest

Disabled
Joined
Nov 10, 2002
Location
illinois
How does the multiplier in a CPU work

i get the FSB and the fact that the CPU's speed comes off of this FSB x multiplier but i dont get what the multiplier is doing
 

glock19owner

Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2002
the multiplier controls the CPU clock cycles per second...so when say you set the multiplier to 10, that is the maxium clock cycles per second it will cycle through.
 

glock19owner

Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2002
I would of swore I answered their other post about the same question before...definetly know I answered this one now ;)...
 

Malpine Walis

Disabled
Joined
Nov 23, 2001
Location
Banned Camp
timmyqwest said:
How does the multiplier in a CPU work

i get the FSB and the fact that the CPU's speed comes off of this FSB x multiplier but i dont get what the multiplier is doing

OK here it is.

The processor communicates with the rest of the system via the system bus. Back when desktop computers first came out, the processor worked at the same speed as the rest of the system. Of course back then, processors were relatively simple beasts that did not have a whole lot of circuitry in the package. In fact, what we now think of as a processor was several chips scattered across the motherboard.

Throughout to 80’s, as computers were improved, each new generation of processor would integrate some of the functions that had previously been located on the other chips. At the same time, new ideas for circuitry were coming out at a fair pace (at 16mhz, on the motherboard is just as good a location as on the processor). Beginning with the 80486 processors that were the big guns at the end of the 80’s, processors now had enough circuitry to do useful work twice as fast as the motherboard. At the same time, motherboard manufacturers were hitting some technical hurdles to making their products faster. Intel’s response to this was to start cranking out 66mhz chips that could run on 33mhz boards.

Today, the development cycle is still going on and modern processors can do useful work at ten or twenty times the speed of the motherboard. On die memory controllers are one of the next big things. Down the road a way for the desktop, today’s supercomputers are using ram chips that have processor circuitry built in (PIMRAM chips will try to keep the RAM organized so that the next data the processor is likely to request will be positioned in the chip for the fastest possible data retrieval).
 

Thelemac

Administratively Deficient
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
I could be wrong, but I was under the impression that the MMU was already on die.

*wracks his brain*

Bah, I can't remember if cache is hit before or after it. Will check my notes and let ya know. ;)
 

AcEmAsTr

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2002
Location
Huntingdon UK
Malpine Walis said:


OK here it is.

The processor communicates with the rest of the system via the system bus. Back when desktop computers first came out, the processor worked at the same speed as the rest of the system. Of course back then, processors were relatively simple beasts that did not have a whole lot of circuitry in the package. In fact, what we now think of as a processor was several chips scattered across the motherboard.

Throughout to 80’s, as computers were improved, each new generation of processor would integrate some of the functions that had previously been located on the other chips. At the same time, new ideas for circuitry were coming out at a fair pace (at 16mhz, on the motherboard is just as good a location as on the processor). Beginning with the 80486 processors that were the big guns at the end of the 80’s, processors now had enough circuitry to do useful work twice as fast as the motherboard. At the same time, motherboard manufacturers were hitting some technical hurdles to making their products faster. Intel’s response to this was to start cranking out 66mhz chips that could run on 33mhz boards.

Today, the development cycle is still going on and modern processors can do useful work at ten or twenty times the speed of the motherboard. On die memory controllers are one of the next big things. Down the road a way for the desktop, today’s supercomputers are using ram chips that have processor circuitry built in (PIMRAM chips will try to keep the RAM organized so that the next data the processor is likely to request will be positioned in the chip for the fastest possible data retrieval).

:eek: very informative post there
 

Mr. $T$

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2001
Malpine Walis said:


OK here it is.

The processor communicates with the rest of the system via the system bus. Back when desktop computers first came out, the processor worked at the same speed as the rest of the system. Of course back then, processors were relatively simple beasts that did not have a whole lot of circuitry in the package. In fact, what we now think of as a processor was several chips scattered across the motherboard.

Throughout to 80’s, as computers were improved, each new generation of processor would integrate some of the functions that had previously been located on the other chips. At the same time, new ideas for circuitry were coming out at a fair pace (at 16mhz, on the motherboard is just as good a location as on the processor). Beginning with the 80486 processors that were the big guns at the end of the 80’s, processors now had enough circuitry to do useful work twice as fast as the motherboard. At the same time, motherboard manufacturers were hitting some technical hurdles to making their products faster. Intel’s response to this was to start cranking out 66mhz chips that could run on 33mhz boards.

Today, the development cycle is still going on and modern processors can do useful work at ten or twenty times the speed of the motherboard. On die memory controllers are one of the next big things. Down the road a way for the desktop, today’s supercomputers are using ram chips that have processor circuitry built in (PIMRAM chips will try to keep the RAM organized so that the next data the processor is likely to request will be positioned in the chip for the fastest possible data retrieval).

why are your stars Orange?
 

Malpine Walis

Disabled
Joined
Nov 23, 2001
Location
Banned Camp
Thelemac said:
I could be wrong, but I was under the impression that the MMU was already on die.

*wracks his brain*

Bah, I can't remember if cache is hit before or after it. Will check my notes and let ya know. ;)


Well, I could be wrong about the new technology but my impression is that hammer is supposed to have some type of on die memory controller that will represent an improvement.

Mr. $T$ said:


why are your stars Orange?


Heck if I know. The mods have not asked me what color stars I want. Not that it matters to any great degree. The regular members are the meat and potatoes of the forums and it is cool enough to be part of that crowd. Also, given the chance to nominate members for promotion there are a few people I would give the blues to. See this thread for more info.