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Intel may soon support overclockers!

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Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
SmellyDraws said:
what exactly is it to "unclock" a chip?

Unlocking a chip will allow you to set the chip's multiplier. That will let you increase or decrease the number of clock cycles that will go through the chip. Many here want access to the multiplier so that when they reach their maximum overclock, they can decrease the multiplier and increase their fsb. Now although you might be losing clock cycles, the fsb will usually more than make up for that.
 

Darkseid

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2001
Location
Argentina
Tipycol said:


Unlocking a chip will allow you to set the chip's multiplier. That will let you increase or decrease the number of clock cycles that will go through the chip. Many here want access to the multiplier so that when they reach their maximum overclock, they can decrease the multiplier and increase their fsb. Now although you might be losing clock cycles, the fsb will usually more than make up for that.

man if he understood that must be really clever :D

i have a celeron 1.0ghz with 100mhz fsb (not really but...) and a 10x multiplier, soo 100mhz (fsb) x 10 (mult) = 1.0 ghz, if i rise the multiplier to 11 i have 1.1ghz final , but intel chips won´t let us change that :(
 

SmellyDraws

Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2002
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Yes I do understand that the multiplier x fsb=cpu speed. What I did not understand was the advantage of a smaller multiplier. I know the 2.26 is one of the best overclockers because it has such a low multiplier. Why is a low multiplier better?
 

Edward2

Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2002
Location
[email protected] in Ball Ground, GA
First of all, an unlocked multiplier lets you lower the multiplier and raise the FSB more than you can with a locked multiplier. The reason you want to do this is it speeds up your overall system.

A CPU running at 10 x 150 = 1500 will benchmark higher than a CPU running at 15 x 100 = 1500.

The lower multiplier CPU's like the 2.26 usually have more room for overclocking than higher multiplier CPU's. The higher multiplier CPU's are often already at the max limit for that core design.
 

Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Yes I do understand that the multiplier x fsb=cpu speed. What I did not understand was the advantage of a smaller multiplier. I know the 2.26 is one of the best overclockers because it has such a low multiplier. Why is a low multiplier better?

As I said above, a smaller multiplier will allow you a higher fsb. I'm not sure how exactly Intel's P4 fsb works, so I'll explain with a PIII 1.4GHz Tualatin. Say you have your tualatin and you overclock it to 1585MHz or 150fsbX10.5. But say that is the max for your chip, a bad OC in most cases. If the chip was unlocked, you can improve performance by increasing the fsb, but decreasing the multiplier. Change the multi to 9.5 and put the fsb at 166, and you have basically the same speed, but more performance. This is where what I said above comes in. Although you have less clock cycles from the multiplier, you get more work done per cycle due to the higher fsb, that's what gives you a better performance and why people want to have their multi's unlocked, so when they reach the max of their chip, they can still get a performance boost by increasing their fsb but lowering their multi. Hope this wasn't as confusing ;)

EDIT: Wow I took so long being complicated Edward2 beat me to an explanation :eek:
 

hipro5

Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2002
Location
Athens---Hellas
Well...... that's an unlocked multiplier.... :D

2,8GHZ@2,8_X21.png


2,8GHZ@1600_X12.png


mem227_c2_2_2_7_jpg.jpg
 

NookieN

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Location
The West
Think about this: if Intel's considering special motherboards for overclocks, it's a good bet they're also considering special CPUs for overclockers.
 

Darkseid

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2001
Location
Argentina
well sometimes a lower multiplier isn`t the best as you can see in my sig my mobo max out at 143 fsb, and i`m sure that this chip could go way beyond that, so if i have a tualatin 1.1a isntead that can do at least 140sfb my system should be much more faster because i can`t use the extra benefit that usually lower multipliers give you
 

doer

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Location
EU, Finland
NookieN said:
Think about this: if Intel's considering special motherboards for overclocks, it's a good bet they're also considering special CPUs for overclockers.

Btw. if they made special CPUs just for overclockers I bet it could affect guarantee... I mean maybe they wouldn't take back those cpus if overclocker kills one.
 

cack01

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2002
Location
San diego or UC Davis
jdmcnudgent said:
even with the es chips with the unlocked multi, you roughly get the same overclock. and, the chips oc'ed with the higher multi's get better benchies in sandra, and probably better in real world performance.

I just want to ability to run @ 200FSB. :D
 

james.miller

Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Location
Dunstable, uk
do you think that in any way, that this could be used to 'cover up' that paladium security thing?
you know - bring out something really cool so the dodgy little things you do in the background dont get noticed
 

NookieN

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Location
The West
james.miller said:
do you think that in any way, that this could be used to 'cover up' that paladium security thing?
you know - bring out something really cool so the dodgy little things you do in the background dont get noticed

No, I do not. I see this mostly as an attempt to create a buzz around new products and maybe sell some higher-margin boards.

The people who are whining about Palladium now will still be whining about it if and when Intel releases something like this.