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internet speed

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soldierguy

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Location
California
Hi there

I'm a noob at this stuff, and I'm playing more on line games and in the process I'm evaluating my internet connection "speedtest" results from www.speedtest.net. My results look really bad. And that surprises me. I'm wondering why so bad. I ran 3 test within the last 20 min--its 9Am PST here. And they all look the same. I'm getting down 2.57mb/s and up .043 mb/s and a ping of 26ms. I don't have any recorded history of previous tests, and don't remember what the previous results were. Because of that i'm not sure if this is temporary or something in my telephone wire here at home or the service that I'm using. Currently I'm using AT&T DSL a standard service that comes with a phone--a phone I don't really need-hardly ever use the land line! Could live fine with the Cell. Thinking of switching to cable--Comcast or? Are they better? They promise much higher speeds! Do they deliver. Should I first try replacing the phone wire from the box on the outside of my house that runs into the house etc--its only a few inches actually but its probably ages old? Does it go bad? I would think if it works/its working, but what do I know? Or could it be slower because of the wired router I'm using--I can of course remove the router and test again. I'm using a D-Link Broadband Gigabit Gaming Router model DGL-4100 and it is "wired". Also using a At&T Motorola dsl modem ADSL Modem model 2210-02.
According to on line web page data etc my address at home with Comcast would give me 16mb/s 2mb/s up to 20mb/s 4mb/s for ther "performance" mode:confused:. Is that right? That's a huge improvement. Or is that just smoke?

Appreciate any help
Thanks Tom
 

Leviathan41

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
@Home, Folding
Your internet download speed doesn't really matter when gaming, what you need to look at is the ping and your ping is a very good 26ms. I'm guessing your DSL service is 3.0Mbps up and 512Kbps down, which is plenty good for gaming. If you want to download files faster, you could try bumping up to the next tier of service (probably 6Mbps). Have you had any issues gaming on your connection? Your numbers look fine and like I said, ping is the most important number, and you have a low ping so your gaming performance should be fine.

I know internet service companies are different in every area but I can give you my history. I used to have Comcast cable internet and while it downloaded fast, gaming performance was very bad during peak times (nights and weekends). My ping would shoot up to 300 ms at night and made it impossible for me to play games. I switched to AT&T DSL and never had any more ping problems. I am very pleased with it's gaming performance.
 

deathman20

High Speed Premium Senior
Joined
Aug 5, 2002
Pings are key in games. Though typically its tied more so to location and how your ISP routes you around the network. Followed by upload speeds which if not mistaken anything over 20KB/sec for upload is more then plenty for gaming and toss another 10KB/sec in there if there is voice coms involved. That is provided by majority of services out there easily.

Download as long as you get 50-75KB/sec down you'll be fine, which is 1/3 to 1/4 of your line speed as saying. This is on the high end of things but I've seen some points in games get this high in MMO's mainly.
 

TollhouseFrank

Senior Headphone Guru
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Location
T3h [email protected]!
i'm sure if you do enough research, you'll find that most online games use very little bandwidth, actually. It IS the pings that matter. faster turn-around on what you are telling your avatar/character to do = more responsive gameplay.

For example, World of Warcraft uses i think about 7-10kbps up, and about 2x that down.... some of my favorite FPS's in the past used even less... just 2-3kbps up and down.

it isn't the speed that matters as much as the latency. lower latency = faster reaction to and from the server.

something you can do to help yourself out is to call AT&T up and ask them to help you run a test on your line to see if you can get fastpath vs. interleave on your DSL.
 

MattNo5ss

5up3r m0d3r4t0r
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
Nice info guys. I was wondering why I can't play my PS3 online with 1.5Mb/s down and 512Kb/s up. It's definitely my 900ms ping...lol.
 
OP
soldierguy

soldierguy

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Location
California
Ping

Hi all thanks much

I've never really gotten that "straight". For sure I don't download or upload much--and no movies for sure. I watch a little Hulu etc and those things work fine. I'm just concerned with gaming.

And I definitely have a good ping when I see my numbers at games. Its not what it once was. And I don't know why? I might not be controlling that of course--it might be in the "tubes" lol. A year ago I was usually getting a 11-15 pings at sites when I played things like COD2 multi. But now its more like 35+-it varies of course. But never "low" as it once was.

I've heard a lot of criticism -- on line--from fellow competitors and teamates about their Comcast connection. I'm just speculating but I'm sure Comcast has more non gamers downloading movies etc than the phone company! I don't have the data, but its probably more that way.

So i guess the only thing is:

1. why has my ping as good as it is more than doubled? If I recall it just sort of started creeping up/I don't recall a "sudden change. And I am only 2blocks from the local DSL phone company "hub" or whatever that's called, and I guess the ISP server is within 50miles if I understand that correctly--I guess that's why I've got the low ping? Happy about that.

2.TollhouseFrank you mentioned fastpath vs. interleave DSL-what's that? never heard of it

Right now I pay about $60 to the phone company for a phone/which is just a vehicle for telemarketers to "stalk" me Its $30 for the DSL and $30 for the phone. I'd love to get an improved phone company DSL and just get rid of the land line and use my cell phone. So i guess I can afford to spend more on my gaming connection if AT&T offers it/and just drop the phone.

Thanks Tom
 

BenF

Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2005
Location
Hell, Michigan
Your ping changes based on what server you are connected to. For example if you connect to a LA server you'll probably have a ping between 30 and 50. If you connect to a NYC server your ping will be closer to 100. It depends on more things than distance (how your ISP routes traffic, how much load is on the lines, etc etc) but basically the farther away from the server you are the greater your ping will be.
 
OP
soldierguy

soldierguy

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Location
California
Ping

Thanks Ben

That clarifies things. And it answers a question for me too, in that I played a lot at one particular server last year, and I noticed most everyone's ping had gone up. I'll bet they got a new server at a different location. I just noticed ping numbers going up, but I was probably overlooking that some peoples' went down.

Tom:)
 

vgta88

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
you can request a dry loop(just internet on the line, no phone) and cancel your phone service.

you can also ask the tech department to do a line test. you might have to go through tier 1 techs by doing a speedtest on maybe at&t's site, if they have one, then if the speed does not match what you are paying for they might transfer you to the tech department.

From there, there are a number of things that can be wrong but the best thing to rule out house wiring limiting your speeds is to connect as close and directly as you can to your telephone box outside the house and not connect any telephones that can add resistance to the line. Pot splitters or directly connected dry loops should improve things but you might not need the speed.

I think having a slightly better upload speed would help but it's mostly ping that matters.
 

King107s

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Wait a sec! I think the ping youre seeing is the local server that youre doing the bandwidth test on so it should always be good....

You need to go to http://www.pingtest.net/ and check your line quality and pings there.

Edit: You can also do a little self check by going to the run prompt and typing cmd then hit enter. When you get the prompt type tracert www.google.com and hit enter. Watch the latency for each of your hops. If your ping is low all the way through to the backbone theres not a lot you can do, its an ISP problem that they arent going to improve any time soon.
 

SteveLord

Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Cable will be faster. Phone companies' only hope of having better internet is if they can provide fiber, that doesn't rape your wallet.
 

TollhouseFrank

Senior Headphone Guru
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Location
T3h [email protected]!
fastpath vs. interleave.

Interleave is the 'default' style of dsl connection. it is more fault tolerant, but increases ping time. if you lines are good enough between you and the CO, and you have good wiring in the house and you have a very good SnR ratio (signal to noise), then going fastpath will get you faster packet turnaround (as much as 40-50% faster on the latency), but you can lose some of your top-end speed due to less error correction.
 

TollhouseFrank

Senior Headphone Guru
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Location
T3h [email protected]!
Cable will be faster. Phone companies' only hope of having better internet is if they can provide fiber, that doesn't rape your wallet.

rarely is that true anymore.

DSL offerings are often nowadays just as fast as most cable internet offerings (3-7mb average vs. 3-7mb average? a total wash), and considering you have a dedicated line to the internet vs. a shared connection with your neighborhood on cable.... DSL often comes out ahead, especially during peak usage hours.
 

PretzelPusher

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Location
Indianapolis, IN
fastpath vs. interleave.

Interleave is the 'default' style of dsl connection. it is more fault tolerant, but increases ping time. if you lines are good enough between you and the CO, and you have good wiring in the house and you have a very good SnR ratio (signal to noise), then going fastpath will get you faster packet turnaround (as much as 40-50% faster on the latency), but you can lose some of your top-end speed due to less error correction.

That's news on me... and how does one enable this fastpath???
 

sobe

Unscathed Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2005
As per OP, I'd go ahead and make the switch to Comcast. May not be a widely liked cable service, but the speeds it offers are good(much faster downloads/uploads than AT&T's DSL). Considering I first went from AT&T DSL to Time Warner Roadrunner to Comcast(Comcast bought out TimeWarner where I was living), I'd say 100% without a doubt go to Comcast. In addition you can go Digital Cable with them in a package too for tv, to get rid of that nasty satellite :p

Btw, you want bad, I'm on WildBlue satellite for internet and DishNetwork for tv..... Yay for 1.5Mbit @ $90/month, need I mention 1,600ping is the lowest Ive seen in latency.... Oh and lets not forget the rolling 30day 17GB bandwidth limit. Once you go over that 17GB within 30days your net becomes slower than dialup, so much so you cant even load Google.com so you are stuck WITHOUT any net at all. YAY for technology -.-
 
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Leviathan41

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
@Home, Folding
rarely is that true anymore.

DSL offerings are often nowadays just as fast as most cable internet offerings (3-7mb average vs. 3-7mb average? a total wash), and considering you have a dedicated line to the internet vs. a shared connection with your neighborhood on cable.... DSL often comes out ahead, especially during peak usage hours.
Agree 100%. As I said earlier, my cable ended up nearly unusable for gaming. I switched to DSL and haven't had any ping issues in 2 years now.
 

TollhouseFrank

Senior Headphone Guru
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Location
T3h [email protected]!
Btw, you want bad, I'm on WildBlue satellite for internet and DishNetwork for tv..... Yay for 1.5Mbit @ $90/month.... Oh and lets not forget the rolling 30day 17GB bandwidth limit. Once you go over that 17GB within 30days your net becomes slower than dialup, so much so you cant even load Google.com so you are stuck WITHOUT any net at all. YAY for technology -.-

you are getting gypped. It's currently 80 a month for your package... not 90. (i know cause we sell/install wildblue AND hughesnet at the pc shop i work at).

oh, and it's technically 17.5gbs down.. :blah:
 

sobe

Unscathed Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2005
Not entirely true, you have to lease or purchase the satellite, so that's like $8 or $10/month extra. So it adds up to that regardless.

I think the whole satellite thing is a gip anyway(HughesNet I think has it right with the daily limit, but 1GB per rolling 24-hours I think would be great for the price, but we moved from HughesNet because of the couple hundred megabyte limit). Charter Cable refuses to run a line down the 2nd half of my road because whoever put in the telephone poles zig zagged the poles over the road instead of running along the side of the road and it will cost, according to Charter $200,000+ to lay the cable down 1/2 mile farther.
 
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