• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Is My Cpu Temp Too High????

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

aaroncat

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2003
MY cpu temp (according to PC PROBE) is 38°C at idle and at max load (using prime95 in torture mode or counterstrike) temps are reaching 56°C, Is this too high, also considering I just yesterday replaced the stock intel fan with a 92 mm zalman with an enormous heatsink????? could i have messed up when I put the new fan on???



specs

P4s533 with P4 2.4 OC'd to 2.88 160FSB
two case fans both blowing out
 

wizard james

Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
u may have bad air flow. ..u need air going in and air going out too.

did u use some kind of Thermal paste?

but yes for your settings its alittle high...the mobo might be reading the temp wrong too so that could be a factor.

edit: what kind of heatsink do u got?
 
OP
A

aaroncat

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2003
yeh the thermal paste was the white stuff that came with the zalman HS and fan.
i have air coming out of 2 fans on the side on the very bottom of my case where do you think would be a good place to put another fan?? just one above?? or on the other side of the case?
 
OP
A

aaroncat

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2003
Would the air flow inside the case affect the cpu temp at all?

from my research i am getting a very wide variety of safe temp zones from people saying 55+C is affecting the life of my cpu and others saying 100+C is when i should be getting worried.

I am more worried about how high and far the load temp is away from idle ranging from idle - 36 to load - 55
 

Ven0m

Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2003
Location
Warsaw, Poland
Airflow in case is important - if ther's no air moving, fan on heatsink sucks air that was heated in heatsink.

If there's proper airflow - air goes to case, is warmed in heatsink, cooling it, then comes outside.

Fans on front & back of case are recommended, but 2 blowing out should last. I also suggest to use good thermal compound to connect heatsink & CPU. High difference between idle & load indicate that this connection may be a problem. ArcticSilver5 is known to be a good paste, Nanotherm also appears to be very good; personally I use Thermopox and I'm satisfied with it. There should be paste on whole area where surface connect, possibly equal layer on whole surface. Don't use too much paste - rather minimum possible to cover area. When applying heatsink, try to apply it in the way not to leave air between heatsink & CPU. When tightening - use pretty much force, but of course not more than makes you worry about CPU / mobo damage.

And what we may call safe temperature... Let it be <80*C, but the lower the better. If temperature is high enough that it inflicts stability, it's too high and should be lowered. Lower temperature also means longer life time of computer parts.
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High

I am more worried about how high and far the load temp is away from idle ranging from idle - 36 to load - 55 [/B]


With good reason.
That delta value is too extreme IMO.
What happens when you run with the sidepanels removed?
I'm guessing that your current setup is marginal...it can handle idle temps okay, but any increase is obviously not being dealt with effectively.
To me, this would indicate the need for more exhaust capability.

I'm fond of roofvents (blowholes), as they take advantage of natural convection currents.
You may/may not even need a fan...sometimes just the vent itself will suffice.
 

CCW

Xtreme refugee
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Location
UK
Ideally, you need equal air flow in and out, air should come in from the bottom front of the case and be exhausted from the top back. if you are noly going to have one fan blowing, make sure it is blowing out as this will create negative pressure in the case so air will come in through cracks to fill the space back up so cool air will alwys enter the case. If you only have one fan blowing in, the air will become warmer and raise the ambient case temperatures as it wont be able to escape the case easily.

Craig
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
CCW,
Is that based on personal experience or just assumed "common sense"?
After extensive testing on my case, I found that having all of my fans act as intakes and leaving the exhaust up to passive venting worked the best for me.
Obviously, every case is unique, which is why I always wonder when I read a hard and fast rule like" the best setup is intake at the casefront and exhaust at the caseback".
That may be a good starting point, but experience has taught me that only exhaustive reconfiguration/testing can really solve the problem.
 

CCW

Xtreme refugee
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Location
UK
Its not so much common sense or my experience but, in fact it is the cause of wind. Wind in our atmosphere is caused by low pressure in one area so the air rushes to fill that area up. it works the same in a PC case but obviously this is on a much cooler scale.

Craig
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
CCW said:
Its not so much common sense or my experience but, in fact it is the cause of wind. Wind in our atmosphere is caused by low pressure in one area so the air rushes to fill that area up. it works the same in a PC case but obviously this is on a much cooler scale.

Craig
I have no doubt about the validity of your statement in general, it's the application to specifics with which I quarrel.
Many physical phenomona are dependent on scale...wind for instance. Here you're talking about massive quantities of air and larger differentials of pressure.
Scale this down to the level we might see in our rooms and PC cases and the effect is so greatly diminished as to be negligable.
Certainly not enough to rely upon for effective computer cooling IMO.

But I could be wrong.:p
 

CCW

Xtreme refugee
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Location
UK
Well, I dont claim to know everything, far from it infact however, if air is only being pulled in, how does it escape? No easily, whereas if negative pressure is created in the case air will always find its way back in. BTW, are you Sprocket from Xtremesys?

Craig
 

Sp1k3

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Location
California
i would say that CCW's theory is right, because its simple sience and i happened to hear that same thing in school. And as far as cooling goes, aaroncat, he should get a nice 92mm or 80mm blow hole. 92mm would be much better
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
CCW said:
Well, I dont claim to know everything, far from it infact however, if air is only being pulled in, how does it escape?
Craig
No, I'm not, but I applaud his/her taste in nicks.

I'm certainly no expert either and subject to the vagaries of opinion also.
But...
Given that I've never seen a case that even approached being airtight, I should think that air can escape through the same openings/grills that you think it will enter under negative pressure.
I don't count on this of course.
I have three, fairly large roof vents for air to wend it's way out of.
I have floor vents with fan(s) bringing in air.
I'm going for a more vertical airflow pattern, trying to utilize the tendency of hot air to rise, rather than attempt to generate enough airflow to create a horizontal airflow path.
 

CCW

Xtreme refugee
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Location
UK
Well it has to be forced out of the case, there is no pressure...thats my point, how can the warm air escape, obviously its going to go out of these holes but its not going out fast enough...
 

Sp1k3

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Location
California
clocker2 sounds like he has a nice air flow going there :) *claps* the only reason why i say that is because if he has cold air come from bottom , (which where it is most abundent) and the heat "rising" out the top. it just flows in and out. like nature
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
CCW said:
Well it has to be forced out of the case, there is no pressure...thats my point, how can the warm air escape, obviously its going to go out of these holes but its not going out fast enough...

Not fast enough?
How fast does it have to escape?
My case runs cooler with the side panels on instead of off.
To me this indicates that the airflow pattern that I've established works pretty well.
Of course all this hard work has just gone to hell as I recently watercooled, so I'm back at square one again...
 

Evil_Eye

Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Location
Up in Canada somewhere.
MY cpu temp (according to PC PROBE) is 38°C at idle and at max load (using prime95 in torture mode or counterstrike) temps are reaching 56°C, Is this too high, also considering I just yesterday replaced the stock intel fan with a 92 mm zalman with an enormous heatsink????? could i have messed up when I put the new fan on???

Try reaseating your heatsink. Those Zalmans are pretty big and it may not be seated right. Also use a thin layer of thermal goop. I found that when a large amount is just slathered on, heat causes bubbles to form in the goo which not only creates a tell tale sign (little veins where there is no goop on the bottom of the heatsink) but higher temps as well.
 

CCW

Xtreme refugee
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Location
UK
clocker2 said:


Not fast enough?
How fast does it have to escape?
My case runs cooler with the side panels on instead of off.
To me this indicates that the airflow pattern that I've established works pretty well.
Of course all this hard work has just gone to hell as I recently watercooled, so I'm back at square one again...

Well its not being pulled out off the case, so the hot air is building up. Some of it is escaping but its not ebing pulled from the case so its building up thus ambient temps rise this is the whole point I am trying to create.

Craig
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
Why bother physically trying to "pull it out" if you can create a condition where it will go of it's own accord?
I don't care if the cool air hangs around, it's not hurting anything.
By creating a flowpath for the hot air to follow, case temps (ambient included) can be kept only minimally above room temps.
My final aircooled configuration has all of my fans blowing in, either ducted to specific sites (CPU/HDD) or placed to encourage vertical flow (i.e. on the floor). The waste heated air rose and flowed out the roof vents. After I had enlarged these vents ( they were sized to accommodate 120mm fans) I discovered that the fans themselves really made very little difference...the heat would escape well enough on it's own.
I was definately trying to balance cooling efficiency with a reasonable noise level, so ultimately I'm sure sacrifices were made, but the end result was perfectly acceptable and didn't conform at all to the general rule of thumb.