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fiji

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Location
berlin
ok well i would like to get a job

ill prolly end up with a comp. science degree, (unless the jobs just keep dissapeering )

in about 7+ years with some certs (i will deff have A+ and the Cisco networking one, forget wat its called) , bachelors degree , and a years experience will i be able to get a job?


i mean i know its relaly hard to find a job right now but i wouldnt mind doing anything computer related

what degrees/certs would i need to be either a programmer, systems admin,
or the like


sorry if none of this makes sense im kinda rabble rabble rabble
 

TommyHolly

Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2003
Location
Chicago
Jobs are not as hard to get as everyone says right now. You have to "exagerate" a bit on your resume to get one that's all. Don't expect to make what you were a few years back too. Currently I am making about only 60% of what I was making 2 years ago and that is AFTER 2 raises.

Read some books on how to get a job too, they help. Um, "How high is your balloon" comes to mind.
 

Jab-tech

The Jab-Tech Guy
Joined
May 7, 2002
Location
Land of Tornados
Don't forget you have to be in the right area... Jobs are scarce in the area I live in... You want an IT job in my town you may as well just jump in the river...

Be prepared to travel or even move... If you live near a big city then you should be able to get an entry level IT job with a BA.. If you live in the boonies (like me) don't hold your breath !!!!
 

Captal_de_Buch

Registered
Joined
May 5, 2003
Location
omokok Indiana
If you haven’t started college yet I’d suggest you look at something like Genetic Engineering or Electrical Engineering instead of Computer Science or Information Systems.

The Corporation I work for is continuing to cut back in the IT department but the Engineering department is hiring Electrical Engineers. They are looking for Purdue EE grads, the kind that have the 3 or more semesters of Calculus Engineering degrees, not the 2 semesters of Calculus Technology degrees.

My personal opinion is that there is still enough IT fat out there for the system to live on for the next 10 years.

I’m going back to college and get a degree in Genetic Engineering, I’m figuring that by this time next year my IT job will be gone.
 

Too Smart

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2002
What precisely is software engineering? Would someone who has a BSc degree in Computer Science with Software Engineering option have the same difficulties finding a job or not?
 

Captal_de_Buch

Registered
Joined
May 5, 2003
Location
omokok Indiana
Too Smart said:
What precisely is software engineering? Would someone who has a BSc degree in Computer Science with Software Engineering option have the same difficulties finding a job or not?

One of my tasks was to create Winrunner scripts for automated tests of new software. There’s not a lot of demand for that now.

Now my company has not only outsourced all of the code writing to India but they have outsourced all the test script writing to India as well.

People in India are writing code for a fraction of what I’m being paid.

India isn’t the only place that scripting and coding is being outsourced to... but I’m too depressed about it to remember where the other places are.
:(
 

Too Smart

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2002
There's one thing I don't understand: If people from third world countries are willing to work for a fraction of what we in the US will work for, then why is only the IT industry being affected? Why aren't electrical engineers from India taking over jobs here and making it harder for Americans with engineering degrees to get jobs?
 

Captal_de_Buch

Registered
Joined
May 5, 2003
Location
omokok Indiana
Too Smart said:
There's one thing I don't understand: If people from third world countries are willing to work for a fraction of what we in the US will work for, then why is only the IT industry being affected? Why aren't electrical engineers from India taking over jobs here and making it harder for Americans with engineering degrees to get jobs?

Good question.

I'm only guessing here but I think it's because there's an actual shortage of EE's all over the world. During the past 20 years it seems like all the colleges world wide put most of their effort into promoting Information Systems / Computer Science.

Just a guess on my part
 

Itchie

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2001
Location
Barrie
Ok listen up everyone... Getting a degree in computer science is the absolute worst thing you can do right now.

The US is importing people from third world countries by the thousands on H-1B visas to fill computer science positions here, because they work cheaper. These people are being imported DESPITE the fact that there are already too many computer scientists in the US who can't find jobs. The H-1B's work for a fraction of what Americans are willing to work for, and the H-1B's are competing not only with Americans but even with each other. I read in a magazine that H-1B programmers make on average 63% the salary of an American programmer. And they don't mind.

Also, there is tremendous age discrimination against computer scientists. Employers simply don't like older programmers (by older I mean anyone above 40). Older programmers are constantly being laid off and replaced with younger ones, and when they get laid off it's really difficult to get a job again. Employers ask for specific software skills (say skills in the Java programming language). You'd think the older programmers could just take a course in Java and be skilled in it, but that's not good enough. The employer demands actually work experience in that specific software skill, which a programmer who has programmed with C isn't going to have. This is an unnecessary requirement by the employer in my opinion, because any competant programmer can become productive in a new programming language in a few weeks, but the employers don't see it that way.

A recent study showed that only 16% of people who received computer science degrees more than 20 years ago still work in the computer field today! The same study said that employers only interview about 2% of resume's they receive.

The saddest thing of all is that it's getting worse. The number of H-1B's is constantly increasing, and as they compete among each other they are willing to work for lower and lower wages.

So in conclusion, if you want to get a degree in a field where you will have an extremely difficult time finding a job, and when you do find one you will always have to worry if you will get laid off tomorrow, then by all means, get a degree in computer science. Otherwise, I would suggest a different career path. If I was to start all over I would become either a doctor or a lawyer.
 

Hatecc

Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Location
New Orleans
Umm, so what if you are going to take a computer engineering degreee but aren't going into the programming side, I want to go into the hardware part of it.

Am i still in trouble, or are those jobs scarce as well?
 

Itchie

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2001
Location
Barrie
Although the H1-B visa is for anyone coming to work in the high tech industry, the vast majority of H1B's are programmers, not engineers. So people with computer engineering degrees do not have as hard a time finding and keeping a job as people with computer science degrees. But getting an engineering degree is difficult due to the workload being much harder than for any other major, and there is a lot of math involved, so many people drop out or change their majors. But if you like math and are good at it then you should be ok.
 

diggingforgold

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Augusta Twp, MI
Getting into computer science is my mistake. The ONLY job that I can think of is working for a broadband provider somewhere nearby. There are just too many people that know way more than I do, and can get payed 4x as less.

I heard that right now, the best thing to get into is related to automotive. If you haven't noticed, auto companies only have a few more years to go before the government starts wanting more and more alt. fuel vehicles. So get a job in chemical engineering (lots and lots and lots of math and chem classes required).

I'm going for an associates in CIS, but I know I won't get anywhere in life with degrees in computers. Business looks like my next choice.

You should MINOR in CIS, but never major in it. Unless of course you have a job waiting for you. Because you won't find one now. It's THE worst thing to get into.
 

DarkJediSleikas

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2002
Location
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Hatecc said:
Umm, so what if you are going to take a computer engineering degreee but aren't going into the programming side, I want to go into the hardware part of it.

Am i still in trouble, or are those jobs scarce as well?

You should study electrical engineering then. Electrical engineering isn't just studying how things are powered. Software engineering is all software, computer engineering is 60% software, 40% hardware, and electrical engineering is 90% hardware and 10% software.

EE includes some fascinating things that are left out in computer engineering, including advanced circuit design and digital signal processing.