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Kaby Lake i3 OC version

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mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
http://www.tweaktown.com/news/54920/intels-next-gen-core-i3-7350k-entry-level-oc-monster/index.html

They claim the i3-7350k will boost to 4.2 GHz (current i3's don't turbo) and also be overclockable, for around $150-180. I just had a quick look on newegg since I have no idea about US pricing, and see the i3-6100 is about $120, i3-6320 is $160, and the i5-6400 is $182, i5-6600k currently $236 on sale. So if their claimed pricing is accurate it would put it at high end i3, low end (non-OC) i5 territory, with a bit of a cost stretch to get to OC quad core. This could be interesting if you need a system which responds to clocks more than cores.

If these work well in Z170 mobos I could get one to play with, but I wouldn't build a new high end system around one. The open question still remains: does the refined process allow higher clocks, not just the higher clock per power that we know for now.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
$180 for an i3? No thanks...

But then there are people like me who don't game or seldom do other demanding tasks that need the extra processing power of an i5 over an i3 but who enjoy overclocking. An unlocked i3 for $60 less would be very attractive.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
I can't see any 2 core CPU good option if you build new PC for anything more than web browsing or HTPC. It will be good only for overclockers who want to make world records in some benchmarks but all others will pick i5+ or cheaper series like pentium or low i3 if they need HT.
Those who want CPU for games will pick i5+. Those who need any CPU which is performing not that bad but in lower price will focus on locked i3 or pentiums just to reduce costs. In the office no one will use K CPU and office computers are constantly over 60% sales.
Most users are not overclocking. Actually low % of users are overclocking anything and you can count it at about 3-5% max. I have no detailed data about it but each year is less overclockers as there is lower demand for higher processing power in home environment.
However Intel probably noticed that their i3 were often used in a budget gaming rigs and many users were looking for unlocked BIOS. They couldn't really control that and that was proving there is some demand on CPU like that. I'm not saying it's good idea to spend money on unlocked i3 but it will sell.
 
OP
mackerel

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Agree with that analysis Woomack.

I'd fall into the OCer category in my interest. A low end i5 build is not of interest to me as it is usually ram bandwidth starved, and you have to go high end (and higher system cost) to make use of its potential. But an i3 would not be similarly starved and if the clock can be cranked up, it should be really interesting. I have a i3-6100 filling the gap in a Z170 mobo at moment, so I'd like to drop a i3-7350k in its place and see what it can do. The 6100 can then go in some cheap non-OC mobo.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Intel is trying to lock all non-Z platforms. You can see that in laptops and servers already. Also H/B chipsets have some limits which will be even worse in the future. They say that the only official combo for overclocking is K series CPU and Z/X series chipset. Simply I wouldn't buy K processor and budget motherboard ... or you know that board you want has all required options ( in most cases it doesn't have or I just expect more ).

I got i3 6320 as I thought I will use it in 2nd pc for games and everything else and I will also overclock it and make some results for rankings. Later I noticed that it's absolute minimum and many new games need at least 4 real cores while some work better on more cores. At the same time games are not scalling much better past 4-4.2GHz so optimal option seems or high locked i5/i7 or unlocked i5/i7. Even low locked i5 isn't good anymore. It's not because games need much stronger CPU but because all is working on more threads and HT is acting like 50% real core in most cases. If not game itself then OS and additional applications in the background are processing something what takes CPU time. In most games I've played I saw huge difference between pentium and i3 but also between i3 and i5. At the same time I saw barely any difference between i5 and i7. I play mainly mmo and from single player games civilization or similar titles which are usually scalling good with cpu cores.

Back to my i3 ... my 6320 has some weird issues after delidding. It's cutting out some devices like IGP or randomly shuts down during work. I got 6600K for its place and performance is much better but I'm not using it now so I will think of selling it and maybe I will get new i7.

Btw. https://www.techpowerup.com/227716/intel-readies-skylake-x-as-its-next-high-end-desktop-platform ... so till next X we have still one year.
 
OP
mackerel

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
My angle is still primarily compute based. A low end i5 with low end ram is starved of performance, and in throughput terms may not be much different than a high clock i3. The i3 has an indirect benefit of doing fewer tasks faster. There is an indirect bonus to doing tasks faster which this would help with. Also as stated I wouldn't build a new system just for an i3. I already have a spare Z170 mobo and ram, so I can pretty much get going by dropping in the CPU. I can't see myself going for a Kaby Lake K quad core as I have three Skylakes already, and post brexit I think that would be a bit painful in cost.

Curious about the delid problems, especially as I recently did my first and there are no known negative consequences other than enjoying a significant reduction in hottest core temps.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Most what I said is rather in general, not really your case as I know you are not really playing games on all your rigs ;)
Re CPU, I have no idea if it's liquid metal issue or something else but all contacts on the top of pcb are protected. Pressure is also good. Processor was working for couple of days in [email protected] and later all the problems started. It was randomly losing graphics. What was weird, motherboard was showing VGA error regardless if there was IGP or discrete graphics. Also was shutting down randomly, sometimes after 30 mins of full load, sometimes after 5h. After that couldn't boot at all. No issues at all on other CPU.
 

dejo

Senior Moment Senior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2001
I killed a 4770k during a delid. just knicked the core a tiny bit on one corner. also cracked a core on one. both are now ornaments
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Well, apparently Intel has determined there is a market for an overclockable i3 and that stands out to me because ever since the the passing of the core 2 duo years customers have clamored for it. Intel tossed out some bait with the G3258 Haswell core which was a Pentium. Folks were disappointed when a Skylake equivalent was not offered so Intel is now responding to that market segment.

I'm one if those who fits in the non gamer "browser/HTPC" crowd but I still enjoy overclocking and it's nice to have a little more pop when I occasionally do something like video encoding. Some of you are missing the main point of it being a less expensive, overclockable chip for people who enjoy overclocking but have more modest CPU power needs. Hey, $60 is $60. I'm betting the Kaby Lake i3 k will sell like hotcakes, similarly to the G3258. It will be considerably more expensive than the G5328 but will also have considerably more pop because of HT. Enough pop to run a lot of games even, if the settings are not ratcheted up too high. It's just what the doctor ordered for a lot of occasional gamers and the "browser/HTPC" crowd.

The other thing that occurs to me is that the i3 k will not need expensive aftermarket cooling to overclock well.
 
Last edited:

RJARRRPCGP

Member
Joined
May 30, 2004
http://www.tweaktown.com/news/54920/intels-next-gen-core-i3-7350k-entry-level-oc-monster/index.html

They claim the i3-7350k will boost to 4.2 GHz (current i3's don't turbo) and also be overclockable, for around $150-180. I just had a quick look on newegg since I have no idea about US pricing, and see the i3-6100 is about $120, i3-6320 is $160, and the i5-6400 is $182, i5-6600k currently $236 on sale. So if their claimed pricing is accurate it would put it at high end i3, low end (non-OC) i5 territory, with a bit of a cost stretch to get to OC quad core. This could be interesting if you need a system which responds to clocks more than cores.

If these work well in Z170 mobos I could get one to play with, but I wouldn't build a new high end system around one. The open question still remains: does the refined process allow higher clocks, not just the higher clock per power that we know for now.

I'm glad to see this! I remember hearing that folks wanted an unlocked Core i3! Because it appears that most games don't even use more than 4 threads, this could be an FX 8370 killer in games!

This sounds like how the G3258 should have been from the get-go. ;)

Hate to say this, but won't be surprised if we have a Kaveri-killer here...

The Athlon X4 860K is a good stop-gap...
 

RJARRRPCGP

Member
Joined
May 30, 2004
It was randomly losing graphics. What was weird, motherboard was showing VGA error regardless if there was IGP or discrete graphics. Also was shutting down randomly, sometimes after 30 mins of full load, sometimes after 5h. After that couldn't boot at all. No issues at all on other CPU.

I hate to say this, it may be related to the RoHS soldering formulae... Some folks allege that (more likely with higher temp peaks and fluctuations) lead-free soldering is more likely to crack or pull away...
 

Mjolnir

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2009
Location
Sydney, Australia
If the price is right this may be a little kicker of a CPU.. But coming up to low end i5 territory, i'd likely just get the i5.. The G3258 was a great chip I used for a while at 4.2ghz for fun and handled most of what I needed it to. But for gamers, in a day where quad cores are actually starting to make a difference, it may not be the best chip.. Time will tell!
 

arkan

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2001
Location
Raleigh, NC
With access to a Microcenter, you can pick up a 6600k for $199 pretty regularly as they put it on sale often. Unless I blew up a cpu and needed a replacement desperately and couldn't afford better, there's no real reason to buy this. Now if you're stuck in BFE and they're trying to charge you $250+ for a 6600k, the i3 suddenly looks more attractive at the lower price.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
With access to a Microcenter, you can pick up a 6600k for $199 pretty regularly as they put it on sale often. Unless I blew up a cpu and needed a replacement desperately and couldn't afford better, there's no real reason to buy this. Now if you're stuck in BFE and they're trying to charge you $250+ for a 6600k, the i3 suddenly looks more attractive at the lower price.

I would agree with that.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
I hate to say this, it may be related to the RoHS soldering formulae... Some folks allege that (more likely with higher temp peaks and fluctuations) lead-free soldering is more likely to crack or pull away...

I've noticed that in higher RMA rate when I was working in distribution and RoHS started to be requirement. Was also harder to fix some motherboards or graphics cards.
 

arkan

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2001
Location
Raleigh, NC
You experience seems to be typical of dealing with RoHS solder. I've had to switch over to using silver based solder as I kept getting components separating from the solder joint over time due to the inflexibility of the RoHS solders when exposed to thermal cycling. I've also had this kill a couple of electronic items I've purchased within about a yeah of the purchase date. Luckily they could be fixed normally and I haven't run into the tin whiskey problem as of yet.