• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Kernel version

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
Hey fellow Linux folks,

Looking to run some heavy code (very CPU intensive, very long duration execute time) on my new Ryzen system. The problem: I need a fairly new kernel, newer than most distros support right now. I've never had much luck replacing the kernel in the past, and the custom compiled one I ran eons ago never worked right, but from what I have seen I need 4.10 for optimal Ryzen support. I generally stick to Debian based distros, and previously ran Debian testing on my laptop, and Ubuntu LTS releases on my desktop.

What is Debian testing running as a Kernel right now? I know they initiated a package freeze recently, and didn't know what kernel they are running for the freeze. Any suggestions for distros that support 4.10 after updating or can easily and reliably upgrade the kernel to 4.10?
 

orion456

Member
Joined
May 31, 2004
Ubuntu 16.04 reports using uname -r kernel version:

4.4.0-21-generic

pretty far from 4.10
 
OP
Bluefalcon13

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
Yeah already did that. Was hoping someone on Debian Testing would let me know what the current kernel is. Might have to install it again on my new laptop to check this evening.
 
OP
Bluefalcon13

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
You can just grab your kernel from Ubuntu

http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10/

I've not had a problem doing this in the past. I currently run antergos and even it is only on 4.9.1.11. Brand new kernels can be an interesting adventure
Thanks, I'll look into this tonight. The bad thing is I need a good amount of stability. I wouldn't be surprised if the data I am trying to calculate takes a few days or more to finish. The number of iterations is just massive. The program itself is going to be realistically simple, but I'm looking at approximately 2^63 iterations. Its not a requirement per-say, but it is what I want to do for the project :/

Wish I had a bit more time. Gotta get something going tonight to evaluate the viability of this as a project, and still have time to shift gears if it is too big. My old 16.04 install (from my FX build) is working, but tosses quite a few errors during boot up. Gonna start with a fresh install of 16.10, and try jumping kernels. If that fails, it's on to Debian testing, as that stays pretty close to current as possible without being SID (AKA broken very often).

Other option is to learn opencl and see if I can offload it to the GPU for massively parallel, but I don't know if it would handle it well due to the project itself. Basically I am filling a software (C) emulated key-stream generator and evaluating initial states, and possibly the next couple states (depends how long the data generation takes).
 
OP
Bluefalcon13

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
You can just grab your kernel from Ubuntu

http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10/

I've not had a problem doing this in the past. I currently run antergos and even it is only on 4.9.1.11. Brand new kernels can be an interesting adventure
So an update, after fighting USB drive formating software in Windows for about an hour, I managed to give up and format my flash drive with diskpart for gpt then dumped the iso on it. Could've saved alot of time if I didn't use the tools and just did it manually the first time [emoji14]

16.10 is installed with 4.10.6 kernel as per your suggestion. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction!
 
OP
Bluefalcon13

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO

Yeah I forgot my old laptop still had debian testing installed. Fired it up for the first time since Dec (when I got my new Yoga), and ran the half a million updates. That was the kernel it pulled down. For Ryzen you need a much later version of 4.9 to get the back-ported patch for the scheduler. I just installed Ubuntu 16.10 and pulled down the 4.10.6 kernel from the mainline link a few posts up.

Fun thing though. I ran an "sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade" and it was trying to get me to download the latest 4.8 kernel. I declined the update as I didnt want to mess with having to reinstall 4.10.6. Is there a way to add that mainline link as a PPA so that apt doesn't downgrade me?