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Lan speed

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wolfy1220

Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Location
Lincoln, Nebraska
I have a d-link di-604 router that is rated at 10/100, I have a freeNAS setup on it port 3, my pc on 1, wifes on the second port. I seem to be unable to achieve speeds higher than 10 mb up and down to the freeNAS. My computer teacher at school basically told me I was limited because it is using the 100 for internet and the 10 for LAN transfers. Is this true?
I am using cat5e UTP.
I was thinking of hooking up my switch that I am not using which is a dlink 5+ rated at 10/100 and setting up a seperate network on the switch. Having 2 NIC's in each pc and just the 1 in the freeNAS. Would I be able to attain 100 then?
 
You should be getting better speeds than that and your router should be doing 100 full duplex if all the devices support it. You're using an older PC for your NAS? Is the nic 10/100 or better? Tried changing the cable from the router to the NAS? Try another port on the router?
 
freeNAS is a 1Ghz AMD Thunderbird on a uwave board, with a newer 10/100 NIC.
My machine has vista with onboard 10/100 LAN
Wifes is onboard as well, 10/100 LAN

Just tried a new cable with a new port and still only getting 11333kb - roughly 11 mb
 
try on vista disable ipv6 and make sure its up to date :)

edit: also try turning off tcp tuning


Landshark had similar problems, by doing these on the vista box you should see speed increases.
 
Tried those and they didnt help, I also tried a NIC card in my machine thinking maybe it was just the onboard that sucks. Wife has the same speeds in xp as I get in vista.:confused:
 
I have a d-link di-604 router that is rated at 10/100, I have a freeNAS setup on it port 3, my pc on 1, wifes on the second port. I seem to be unable to achieve speeds higher than 10 mb up and down to the freeNAS.

How are you measuring, and are you keeping in mind the difference between MB and Mb?

10 MB/s would be near the maximum speed of a 100 Mb/s network.
 
Tonight my tests are not even reaching 10mbps typically they do..

CIFS network share
cifsfy0.jpg


FileZilla
filezillapc8.jpg


WS_FTP Pro
wsftpyi0.jpg


Vista Sidebar Network Meter
sidebarnetmetergq8.jpg


Those are how I am measuring.
 
How are you measuring, and are you keeping in mind the difference between MB and Mb?

10 MB/s would be near the maximum speed of a 100 Mb/s network.

Exactly. 100Mb/8 = 12.5MB/s in a perfect environment. Skim a little off the top for overhead and you don't seem like you're in bad shape.
 
freeNAS is a 1Ghz AMD Thunderbird on a uwave board, with a newer 10/100 NIC.
My machine has vista with onboard 10/100 LAN
Wifes is onboard as well, 10/100 LAN

Just tried a new cable with a new port and still only getting 11333kb - roughly 11 mb

thats good mate. thats 100mb link speed.
 
Tonight my tests are not even reaching 10mbps typically they do..

Just to clarify further what I and some other posters have said...

Look at your captures. They're all showing "MB/s", not "Mb/s" -- there's a big difference, by convention.

b = bit.
B = Byte = 8 x bit.

So 10 MB/s is 10 * 8 = 80 Mb/s, which is pretty good for an actual file transfer when your network speed's theoretical maximum is 100 Mb/s. There's always some overhead and inefficiencies involved, so you couldn't hit the theoretical maximum.

Even 7 MB/s can be "normal" for a 100 Mb/s network. You could spend more effort trying to tweak for the difference between 7 MB/s and ideal performance of around 11 MB/s (you couldn't hit the theoretically perfect 12.5 MB/s), but the better thing to do first could be to improve the network significantly by going to gigabit (gigabit NICs + gigabit switch attached to the existing router).

Gigabit of course would be absolutely no guarantee of exceeding 100 Mb/s actual transfer performance, but you might, provided of course that all NICs and switches in a path were gigabit. Around 20 MB/s is easily achieved with typical hardware and default configurations. Around 10 MB/s is seen sometimes with really low-end / old or badly configured hardware ("fakegigabit" NAS boxes). 50 MB/s or higher can be seen sometimes with higher-end / modern hardware and good configuration.
 
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