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Lapped my Ultra-120 eX (pics and results)

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graysky

Member
Joined
May 6, 2007
When my Ultra-120 X and I have to say I'm a little puzzled. The base where it should contact the heat spreader is not smooth at all, it's actually grooved! You can see a scratch which is where I gently ran my thumb nail over the surface; I could feel the rough edges.

Have a look for yourself:
startzy5.jpg


Anyway, others encouraged me to lap it which I've never done before. After wrestling with the idea for a couple of days as well as reading many articles/guides, I decided to give it a go. Plug: wrote a great guide for HS lapping.

$20 worth of sandpaper, a $2 piece of flat glass, and 4 hours of careful work (and sweat) later, I was left with a pretty darn flat HS. You can see by the pictures that this particular one was quite concave instead of being flat which isn't good for keeping contact between the HS and IHS of the CPU.





Did it work you're probably wondering. The temp data as measured in [url=http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php]speedfan.exe
for a ~1 h x264 encode (uses all 4 cores with a CPU load of >99 %). I had speedfan log the temps (which it does every 3-4 seconds) and I averaged the whole data set per core for the 2nd pass of the 2-pass encode (the 2nd pass is the most CPU intensive). Room temp for both experiments was ~23 °C. By the way, I added a constant of 15 to each core in speedfan since it incorrectly displays temps for quads by 15 °C.

System specs: Q6600 @ 9x333=3.01 GHz (stock voltage), P5B-Deluxe in an Antec p182 case.

Code:
Before lapping the HS:

Core 0: 66.9
Core 1: 66.4
Core 2: 60.6
Core 3: 60.6

After lapping the HS:

Core 0: 64.9
Core 1: 64.4
Core 2: 59.0
Core 3: 59.4

Delta:

Core 0: 2.0
Core 1: 2.0
Core 2: 1.6
Core 3: 1.2
 

nd4spdbh2

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Location
Camarillo, CA!
not bad but i would have used Intel thermal analysis tool tomeasure temps... i would have also gone to 2000 wet dry sand paper.. he he im a bit of a perfectionist.

But nice work non the less glad temps improved some.
 
OP
G

graysky

Member
Joined
May 6, 2007
...it says pentium M when running and when averaging the log file from it and RMClock and Speedfan, the latter two gave very consistent data while the TAT data was not.
 

nd4spdbh2

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Location
Camarillo, CA!
graysky said:
...it says pentium M when running and when averaging the log file from it and RMClock and Speedfan, the latter two gave very consistent data while the TAT data was not.

every c2d is read as pentium m but the temps are the most acurate you can get.
 

Randyman...

Member
Joined
May 8, 2004
There are many people (including one thread where a guy spoke to Intel on the phone) that indicate that TAT is NOT acurate on C2D's. Intel told the guy to use the T-case temp, and not to exceed the rated max temp specified by Intel (Intel specifies the max "safe" CPU temps at T-case, NOT at the cores).

See the thread:
http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?p=344233

PS - Nice lap - but I would agree that going to 1500 would be ideal IMO. Probably no more than 1* beyond what you already improved on. Lower temps rock no matter how you slice (or lap) it!!!

:cool:
 
Last edited:

Soja

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2001
Location
OC, CA
Nice job. Going over 800 grit is unnecessary except for bling factor. Have you let your thermal compound cure yet?
 
OP
G

graysky

Member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Soja said:
Nice job. Going over 800 grit is unnecessary except for bling factor. Have you let your thermal compound cure yet?

Yeah man, see the graph in this thread.
 

ryanmartini

Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2004
Location
douglasville ga
Soja said:
Nice job. Going over 800 grit is unnecessary except for bling factor. Have you let your thermal compound cure yet?

your not a baller till you only polish with 1000 1200 with metal polish, it isnt bling till you can see reflections behind you :D Im kinda thinking about using the dremel to try and polish a cheapie as practice the nmove up :D


Nice lapping btw and be sure to post some results :D
 

Soja

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2001
Location
OC, CA
Of course :D. I lapped my c2d to a mirror finish for the hell of it. Too bad no one will ever see it as long as it's running.
 

gulp35

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2002
I've heard that going over 600 Grit doesn't yield anything beneficial... in addition... not meaning to rain on your parade, but the temp drops you saw are easily justified with changes in the mounting procedure *especially with a high wattage CPU* (this could be with or against your temps) but either way, nothing can be determined from this data unless the temps provided are an average of multiple mountings. :)
 

eternaljammer

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2005
Location
Jax, Florida
gulp35 said:
I've heard that going over 600 Grit doesn't yield anything beneficial... in addition... not meaning to rain on your parade, but the temp drops you saw are easily justified with changes in the mounting procedure *especially with a high wattage CPU* (this could be with or against your temps) but either way, nothing can be determined from this data unless the temps provided are an average of multiple mountings. :)
funny.:clap:
 

Spawn-Inc

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
yes go up to 2000 grit and then polish it with polishing compoud and you can get a pretty good mirror effect.
 

dudleycpa

Member
Joined
May 20, 2002
I thought anything over 800 grit was unnecessary. It doesn't hurt but it doesn't help either.