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Largest RAM size supported by a motherboard

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nulik

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Jan 28, 2012
As of February 2016, what is the maximum size of RAM a motherboard currently supports?

TiA!
Nulik
 

EarthDog

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That would depend on the platform and specific motherboard.

Dual socket Server board (or quad socket) can hold a shed load (1TB?)

The desktop platform will also vary. Are you talking mainstream platform (Z97/Z170) or the HEDT (X79/X99) platform? AMD?
 
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nulik

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Jan 28, 2012
What platform?
Desktop or server?
x86 or otherwise?

that really doesn't matter much, a commodity PC can be used as server too, if you reboot it once in a while.

X86 motherboard

- - - Updated - - -

Dual socket Server board (or quad socket) can hold a shed load (1TB?)
single socket board, are there any models I could find online and check the prices?
 

EarthDog

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Server boards? For what platform/CPU??? Sure there is information online!

I feel like we could help you better if you share what you are trying to accomplish. As it stands you asked about physical capacities, and are now on about pricing and boards? We can help you focus your efforts if you share some information. :)

64Gb anyway with Win7 Pro x64 and up
W8 Home is 128GB, 8 Pro is 512GB. W10 Home is 128GB, W10 Pro is 2TB!

Good call on the OS playing a part in this!!!

EDIT: Sorry, I scrolled down further and found this (edited above already): https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/li...vs.85).aspx#physical_memory_limits_windows_10
 

Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
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Thanks E_D and I think most desktop boards max at 64Gb currently
 

EarthDog

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Thanks E_D and I think most desktop boards max at 64Gb currently
On the mainstream platforms with 4 DIMM slots, absolutely. On the HEDT (X79/X99) that doubles to 128GB since on most of those there are 8 slots.
 

Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
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Dec 19, 2012
Ha, ya know I totally forgot that Mine (SOC CHamp) and many Benching boards only have the 4. Guess you can tell which boards I've been looking at.
 
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nulik

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Server boards? For what platform/CPU??? Sure there is information online!

I feel like we could help you better if you share what you are trying to accomplish.

I am not trying to accomplish nothing yet. I am investigating what is the status of current upper bounds of RAM and the costs associated with having this limit increased. For example, if I would want to have a server with 512GB of RAM, how much this setup would cost me? Would it be cheaper than buying 8 cheap motherboards with the cheapest ever processor that support 64GB of ram and distribute the software in 8 different execution units?
 

EarthDog

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Id have to image that a single board and 512GB of ram would be cheaper than 8 different setups. Remember, you have to consider all the other parts involved (8 CPUs vs 1, 8 PSUs vs 1, etc) as well as the time involved to set up and maintain the cluster. You also have to potentially consider software licensing on 8 different setups vs one.
 

Woomack

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Looks like 768GB is max on the linked motherboards. I haven't seen any popular server boards with more than 24 memory slots. Actually all I remember had max 16 slots.
So you need 32GB modules and dual Xeon. Only memory will cost like ~$7000.
 
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nulik

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Only memory will cost like ~$7000.
this is what I was telling, single CPU motherboard , and maxing it out to 64GB will always be cheaper than any solution that will push above this limit. The technology is not very well developed to offer cheap large sized memory solution in one box.
 

WhitehawkEQ

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Dec 6, 2010
SuperMicro quad socket AMD Opteron 6000 series MB's have 32 memory sockets and you could put 32x32GB ECC Reg ram modules for 1TB of total ram. It would cost $7526.40 at MemoryAmerica.com at $235.2 each.

Here is 1 Server MB: Supermicro.com H8QGi-LN4F

Edit: now the largest size ram module is 64GB ECC Reg for Server MB's.
 
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EarthDog

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But 64GB systems would be still cheaper.
Perhaps. It depends on how much ram you actually need, what boards will be used, the processors, the software that needs to run on them and its licenses, as well as someone to cluster them, power supplies, power used, etc.

As you know, prices go down per stick as its capacity decreases. For example, if you bought one of the boards listed with 16 or 24 slots and put 16GB sticks in there, that is 256GB/384GB pretty 'cheap'. Its when you get into the 32/64GB sticks that prices start to shoot through the roof. So it is situation dependent it appears, particularly when you include TCO (Total cost of ownership) and look at everything else needed to make multiple systems and make them work together. Its an exercise that needs defined parameters (which we do not have any here in this thread) in order to come up with a conclusion/cost. :thup:
 
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nulik

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Perhaps. It depends on how much ram you actually need, what boards will be used, the processors, the software that needs to run on them and its licenses, as well as someone to cluster them, power supplies, power used, etc.

As you know, prices go down per stick as its capacity decreases. For example, if you bought one of the boards listed with 16 or 24 slots and put 16GB sticks in there, that is 256GB/384GB pretty 'cheap'. Its when you get into the 32/64GB sticks that prices start to shoot through the roof. So it is situation dependent it appears, particularly when you include TCO (Total cost of ownership) and look at everything else needed to make multiple systems and make them work together. Its an exercise that needs defined parameters (which we do not have any here in this thread) in order to come up with a conclusion/cost. :thup:
Well, I need > 64GB for networking applications, in those, you have to maximize the amount of RAM and minimize the cost. And I don't have software licenses problems since I am the owner of the software.