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Lenovo Ideapad 300s (14) overclock

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ArmaanB

New Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Hey!
I was wondering about overclocking the CPU on my Lenovo 300s (14) 80Q4000KUS. It is pretty much brand new, only 1 week old. The specs are as so:

Processor:
6th Generation Intel Core i5-6200U Processor (2.30GHz 1866MHz 3MB)

Graphics:
Intel® HD Graphics 520

Memory:
8.0GB PC3L-12800 DDR3L 1600 MHz

Hard Drive:
500GB 5400 RPM

Also, I am not so sure about how to enter BIOS/UEFI on this machine, so any help is appreciated! :)
 

Brutal-Force

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
For the record, laptops are rarely overclockable unless its a gaming laptop designed to be overclocked. Even then its typically the dedicated GPU (Graphics Card) that is overclocked. I would bet money yours can't be overclocked. In the UEFI/Bios it probably allows you turn off speed stepping or use less cores to conserve power, but I doubt you can overclock. If you want "faster" then I would suggest picking up a SSD drive. That will help with boot speed and general use, probably more than the .5 Ghz increase you might have gotten IF you could overclock.

My 2 cents.

Edit: To answer why: Because CPUs get really HOT. Something you don't want in a laptop. Plus when a CPU gets hot it "throttles" which is effectively underclocking a processor. Motherboards have been known to die due to heat and the heatsink and fan not keeping up with it. So manufacturers figured out a long time ago to lock down Laptops.
 
OP
A

ArmaanB

New Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
For the record, laptops are rarely overclockable unless its a gaming laptop designed to be overclocked. Even then its typically the dedicated GPU (Graphics Card) that is overclocked. I would bet money yours can't be overclocked. In the UEFI/Bios it probably allows you turn off speed stepping or use less cores to conserve power, but I doubt you can overclock. If you want "faster" then I would suggest picking up a SSD drive. That will help with boot speed and general use, probably more than the .5 Ghz increase you might have gotten IF you could overclock.

My 2 cents.

Edit: To answer why: Because CPUs get really HOT. Something you don't want in a laptop. Plus when a CPU gets hot it "throttles" which is effectively underclocking a processor. Motherboards have been known to die due to heat and the heatsink and fan not keeping up with it. So manufacturers figured out a long time ago to lock down Laptops.

Hmm... I havent found my computer getting very warm at all, most of the time. I have also heard that 6th gen Intel Proccesers in laptops can be overclocked. Still wondering how to open up the BIOS though. Thanks though.
 

Sentential

Contributing Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2003
Location
Knoxville, TN
The key problem you're going to run into is that most of the laptops are EFI and are completely locked down if you can access the BIOS at all. In addition most laptop chips are going to be multiplier locked. At best what you'll get is preventing the CPU from thermally throttling and keeping it either permanently or longer on its turbo multiplier.

Ive been locked on a laptop (macbook) for years now as a result of my job, getting married and how utterly boring the overclocking scene has become and as much as I'd like to try my focus has been more on trying to preserve battery life by disabling turbo so to each his own.

Keep in mind just because it isn't getting warm doesn't mean the laptop is cool. Best bet would be to use something like OpenHardwareMonitor to keep an eye on temps, thats what I'm using on my macbook pro. As an example my processor routinely is at 100c* with turbo-boost on and that drops to the low 80s with it disabled and that's in a cool room on a fan-dock

The best bet for overclocking on a laptop will be using a thunderbolt 3 enabled eGPU which I plan on doing a build for at some point.