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Linux queries extreeme noobish

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verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
I'm gunna ask the most noobish question ever... Can I use word with Mandrake 9.1? I'm downloading this and my girl friend hates m$ so I gunna get linux happening 4 her.

**1** Is there an emulator I can use with office/word?

**2**Is there a linux program that its files can be read by word so she can print them out at her work?

**3**What do I need to get cd-rw's working? (like InCd)

**4**Whats the emulator 4 games? winex? where can I get it?

I no NOTHING about linux and after reading another post here about all the hassel just to read a cd I'm wondering if its really worth it? is it easier(than winxp) in the long run? or do people just use it to say "I use linux"?

Not tryin to start a war or nothing as I actually loved DOS in the day and was wondering if linux is based on simalar grounds? ie not bloated, easy to access files, use trees etc.

Ta 4 your help.
 

Gecedion

Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2002
Location
U.S., Maryland
I'll answer what I can, try here for word. Though give open offce or star office for easier compadability(no emulation). Here is some star office info that might help with your second question.
As long as the OS is recognizing the drive installing a linux compadable burning program should work.

For games you can try WINE(free), and for more support WINEX($$$).
 

moorcito

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2002
Location
Chicago, IL
1 & 2. This was already answered, but I'll put my two cents in. Star Office, and it's free version OpenOffice should be able to read most MS Office documents pretty good. I'm pretty sure that it will even save the files so that MS Office Apps can read them, but since I've haven't actually tried it and knowing how MS doesn't like to have it's different versions of Office be intercompatiable it's hard to what will really happen. You could also try to use wine to run Office Apps, but that requires having MS Office and installing it.

3. There are tons of CR-RW programs for linux. Just search ALT-OS and I'm you find at least a few hits about it.

4. There are linux native games, and there are games that run under wine/winex. Google for wine/winex and you'll find out how to get it, though I'm pretty sure winex cost money, whereas wine is free. Since I don't use either, I can't help much other than to say search ALT-OS also because there are tons of posts about wine/winex, how to get it, and how set it up. Heck there's even a sticky about it.

Like anything new Linux can be a hassel, I'm sure to most people Advanced Calculus didn't come with out a hassel also. I use both Linux and Windows at home and at work, and find that each has it's advantages and disadvantages. As far as being easier in the long run, that's a toss up since it really depends on what you want to get out of it and the time that you are willing to give to learn. With enough time everything is easier in the long run.
 

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Since your other questions have been answered, I'm just going to throw my opinion on regarding your last few questions.

verbatim said:
I no NOTHING about linux and after reading another post here about all the hassel just to read a cd I'm wondering if its really worth it? is it easier(than winxp) in the long run? or do people just use it to say "I use linux"?

Well, you know, there are plenty of hassles in any OS. Once you get used to an OS, you either get used to the hassles and learn to live with them, or figure out ways around them. One thing I like about Linux is that, on the average, there are plenty of ways to get around the hassles.

For example, in that thread where we discussed mounting of a CD-ROM drive, the method I described is the longest, most difficult way to mount a CD. Why do I use that method? Simply because (assuming you're using Linux with the desire to learn Linux) mounting is a fundamental concept that you really ought to understand. Once you've understood the "long way", you can begin using shortcuts, either with automount or the fstab.

I'm a lot more productive with Linux now than I was the first day I installed it, and that's going to be the case with any OS. There is always a learning curve. When I use OSes that used to be second nature to me, they are now a bit more difficult to navigate, simply because I'm used to Linux. One is not harder than another, its simply a matter of experience.

Not tryin to start a war or nothing as I actually loved DOS in the day and was wondering if linux is based on simalar grounds? ie not bloated, easy to access files, use trees etc.

Ta 4 your help.

Well, the command prompt is a very powerful tool in Linux, and if you enjoy the use of a command line interface, I would imagine you would enjoy Linux. Personally, I've found using bash (bourne again shell, the program that virtually all distros use as a command prompt) a bit more pleasant than using DOS, once you get familar with its features. Things like tab completion and the command history are very useful, IMO.

The Linux kernel is designed in a modular manner, with modules that can be loaded or removed while the system is running. Coupled with the ability to recompile your kernel, including only the drivers you need, you can defintely consider it non-bloated at the kernel level (IMO, at least).

There are some user level programs considered bloated, such as the KDE and Gnome desktop environments, for example. The nice thing about Linux is though, that you don't have to use those programs if you don't want to. Window managers like Fluxbox or Window Maker are much faster. While I run KDE on the system in my sig, I wouldn't run it on a 500 mhz system, for example. You can tailor your software choices to the power of your machine, and this flexabilty allows older machines to have a longer useful life, IMO.

Not quite sure about what you mean about the ease of accessing files, but you can manipulate them via the command line, in many ways. I hardly ever use a graphical file manager anymore, the command line is quicker for me.
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
Thnx so far guys. I think my biggest worry is actually learning the command line interface as dos (to me) is quite easy and was what I grew up on and makes sense to me. ie u wanna copy u type "copy" from "a" to "b" But then again it's not as powerfull as linux

I mean what the hell is "mount"?
 
Last edited:

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Well, the concepts are the same, and a lot of the commands are similar. Here's a chart of common commands, along with their DOS equivilant:
http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Command_Reference

IMO, someone like you who is comfortable with a command line is better off than someone like me who grew up pointing and clicking.
 

rogerdugans

Linux challenged Senior, not that it stops me...
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Corner of No and Where
Most of the questions have been fully answered I think, but I do have a comment of the compatibilty of Open Office and MS Word:

It works. Not perfectly- there are often formatting and font issues that arise but they are usually easy to fix.
 

rogerdugans

Linux challenged Senior, not that it stops me...
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Corner of No and Where
Warning- threadjack in progress!

UnseenMenace said:
Have you installed the respective MS fonts Rogerdungans ?

I installed them and they seemed to install correctly, but it could well have been an error caused by yours truly;)

Even with the occasional errors (the worst of which were formatting) it was not tough to switch back and forth from Open Office to Word with documents.

I actually have not used Open Office for a month or three so the problems I had may well have been fixed.
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
Titan386 said:
Well, the concepts are the same, and a lot of the commands are similar. Here's a chart of common commands, along with their DOS equivilant:
http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Command_Reference

IMO, someone like you who is comfortable with a command line is better off than someone like me who grew up pointing and clicking.

hanks this chart is great. Shows all the old dos commands to linux commands.

Just what I need.
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
Well I did install mandrake 9.1 and it killed my winxp install so it cant be recoverd with recovery in setup.

The question is why dosent the graphic setup work but the text version does? Graphics not set up yet?
 

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Sometimes the installers have trouble detecting and configuring your video card, so the X Windows based install fails. The text mode one always (or at least most always) works though :)
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
Yea but at the end of the install it gives u the oppertunity to set ur setting. (size,colours etc.) I did that and then clicked on "preview settings" the screen came up and mouse worked fine. Couldn't get out of it though. No buttons worked. Had to restart. Good bye boot file, goodbye win xp and 12 months of favourites, files, guides etc. Not happy Jan.
 

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Are you sure that your XP is gone? Possibly just the MBR has been overwritten.

One of the most important things to understand before installing Linux is the partition naming scheme. If you don't know it, there is the potential for things like this to happen.

Then there is the old idea about backing up your data. It is a good idea, I know from experience :)

In regards to your mouse button not working, perhaps it couldn't auto-detect your mouse. What kind of mouse do you have?
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
The mouse woked fine. I had a seperate partition for linux but it created a fifth one too. After I restsrted and ran recovery, the partition with win xp on wasn't even recinised as a valid win xp partition. I had to reinstall win xp on the partition I just used 4 linux to get the old partition reconised. All the data is there but I cant access my old documents and settings file. It says "access denied". I wanna get in to retrieve my favorites/cookies/documents etc.
 

klingens

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2002
Location
Xanadu
Run an fdisk program and checkl if your old WindowsXP partition is set to the proper type (fat32 or ntfs, primary or extended). Do you have used encryption on your old windows installation?
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
My winxp partition is fixed now after reinstalling xp on another partition. I can get all data offf the drive except I cat access the documents and settings file.
 

klingens

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2002
Location
Xanadu
If you´re Administrator, you shouldn´t hav any troubles getting the files from the old XP partition unless you used filesystem encryption
 

cack01

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2002
Location
San diego or UC Davis
I went through the same problem when I installed mandrake. All you really needed to do was reinstall the bootloader and tell it manually where your windows is located. For somereason my Lilo gets corupted about once a month, so I'm pretty quick at it now.
 
OP
verbatim

verbatim

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Location
Western Australia Perth
cack01 said:
I went through the same problem when I installed mandrake. All you really needed to do was reinstall the bootloader and tell it manually where your windows is located. For somereason my Lilo gets corupted about once a month, so I'm pretty quick at it now.

How do u do this?

I just got my server2003 disk and I wanna set up a tri boot system! Need help/instructions on swap file(?) etc to set up properly