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Making first rig

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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Hello,

I recently purchased a new case and a new psu. This will be the first time I will install my pc. I have installed stuff like GPU, CPU, RAM. But that is all easy insert and play stuff. A new psu makes me have to put all those wires somewhere. I have got a bit of a clue, but I do want some preparation, can somebody help me? Or have a good guide for it?

case: Antec-1200
psu: Cooler Master Real Power 620W Modular
motherboard: ASUS P5QL-CM
 

psionic98

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2009
take off the panel behind the motherboard, all of your wires can be run behind that panel and come out the access ports all over that case.. near the psu should be a large cutout to push wires through, run them along the back and then back out the grommet holes in the areas where your parts are that need power

it gets trickier for the HDD cage area as theres usually no real access to that area besides coming back into the main compartment of the case, but use alot of zip ties and keep things semi-snug and remember that wires bend.. not like 180degress, but they have some give so use it to your advantage

good luck!
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
take off the panel behind the motherboard, all of your wires can be run behind that panel and come out the access ports all over that case.. near the psu should be a large cutout to push wires through, run them along the back and then back out the grommet holes in the areas where your parts are that need power

it gets trickier for the HDD cage area as theres usually no real access to that area besides coming back into the main compartment of the case, but use alot of zip ties and keep things semi-snug and remember that wires bend.. not like 180degress, but they have some give so use it to your advantage

good luck!

Thank you for your reply. Are there also things I really need to watch out for? That could potentially damage my hardware (or me) ?
 

PhaseZero

Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2003
I'd say just be careful when inserting the 24pin mobo connector as some boards don't have much support there and your board will flex like crazy.
 

psionic98

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2009
agreed.. watch whenever you make connections when pushing hard on a mobo.. evne though you have the standoffs holding it in place, usually they are pretty far apart and edges of the mobo can flex easily..

the only thing that can really damage you is breaking something or a pretty good static discharge... try to find an area without a rug and on like a wooden table to do this work.. I wore latex gloves just to avoid getting body oils on stuff, but I know that was overkill!

Ram/gfx cards should go in without too much hassle, power connectors can be a pain, especially when new so just watch your pressure when putting them on things..other than that you should be just fine.. i thought for sure I would have screwed up my system putting it together, but it really is nearly foolproof..id worry more about everything going together smoothly before wire management.. you can always take it all apart and put it back together if you need to move things around.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Thank you for your replies.

Does somebody have a quick (good) guide for me then how to put everything together? Especially the PSU, because I will leave most stuff wired as I don't change my motherboard, I just change cases and PSU. I could just write down, or take a picture of where the wires are supposed to go.

Was I correct in buying a modular PSU? Someone told me always to go modular, but I don't even know the differences.
 

PhaseZero

Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2003
I don't think you'll need a guide, all the power connections are unique so you can't possibly mix that up. How you tidy up the cables will be up to you. You'll probably spend most your time doing that. If possible route your cables behind the motherboard. As far as modular goes, as long as you bought a quality unit, the only difference will be easier cable management. Less unused cables to hide.
 

psionic98

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2009
modular is much easier to work with since you can remove the cables you dont need and they arent just in the way.

there should be hard-wired ones coming out as your primary connectors.. one should be a 24pin or 20+4 which is your main mobo connector, then there should be 2x 4pin connectors tied together, they are for the cpu and connect to the mobo right next to the cpu, then there should be a 6+2 pin connector, thats for your vid card. All the rest of the modular ones should be for SATA/MOLEX connectors.. they should be self explanatory..read the directions of your mobo/psu if you have other questions they are usually in there to a point.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
I don't think you'll need a guide, all the power connections are unique so you can't possibly mix that up. How you tidy up the cables will be up to you. You'll probably spend most your time doing that. If possible route your cables behind the motherboard. As far as modular goes, as long as you bought a quality unit, the only difference will be easier cable management. Less unused cables to hide.

Thank you for your reply.

I see, I've ordered the Cooler Master Real Power 620W. I reckon that's good to go.

modular is much easier to work with since you can remove the cables you dont need and they arent just in the way.

there should be hard-wired ones coming out as your primary connectors.. one should be a 24pin or 20+4 which is your main mobo connector, then there should be 2x 4pin connectors tied together, they are for the cpu and connect to the mobo right next to the cpu, then there should be a 6+2 pin connector, thats for your vid card. All the rest of the modular ones should be for SATA/MOLEX connectors.. they should be self explanatory..read the directions of your mobo/psu if you have other questions they are usually in there to a point.

Ah right, I'll just stop asking questions and just try and fail. Thank you all :)
 

RollingThunder

Destroyer of Trolls & Spammers
Joined
Jan 7, 2005
Thank you for your replies.

Does somebody have a quick (good) guide for me then how to put everything together? Especially the PSU, because I will leave most stuff wired as I don't change my motherboard, I just change cases and PSU. I could just write down, or take a picture of where the wires are supposed to go.

Was I correct in buying a modular PSU? Someone told me always to go modular, but I don't even know the differences.

Baris,

Check this thread for cable assembly and management. Our guys are very good and creative.

http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=445933

Modulars are fine if you're not using all your cables for extra peripherals.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Baris,

Check this thread for cable assembly and management. Our guys are very good and creative.

http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=445933

Modulars are fine if you're not using all your cables for extra peripherals.

Indeed they are. I don't really use any extra peripherals to be honest. So I should be able to keep mine clean even easier. Right now it's awful though.

Btw: What do you lads do against dust? My vacuum cleaner works decent but there are spots it cannot get to. (Not even if I take the parts out)
 

RollingThunder

Destroyer of Trolls & Spammers
Joined
Jan 7, 2005
Indeed they are. I don't really use any extra peripherals to be honest. So I should be able to keep mine clean even easier. Right now it's awful though.

Btw: What do you lads do against dust? My vacuum cleaner works decent but there are spots it cannot get to. (Not even if I take the parts out)

Baris,

I use a low psi (15 lbs psi) electric bycycle air pump every few months. That low pressure is barely adequate but it works. If you have access to an outside air pump, try it. However, a high pressure auto tire pump can be risky if you get it too close, you can blow traces loose. Don't use a vacuum unless you are extremly careful not to touch transistors and other electronics directly, it can create static electricity.

If you have access to an air pump, block all fans from over-spinning by using a wooden popcicle stick or similar.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Baris,

I use a low psi (15 lbs psi) electric bycycle air pump every few months. That low pressure is barely adequate but it works. If you have access to an outside air pump, try it. However, a high pressure auto tire pump can be risky if you get it too close, you can blow traces loose. Don't use a vacuum unless you are extremly careful not to touch transistors and other electronics directly, it can create static electricity.

If you have access to an air pump, block all fans from over-spinning by using a wooden popcicle stick or similar.

Thanks a lot for your reply. I will try to buy an air pump.