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Metals For Water Blocks

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DodgeViper

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2001
Location
WILDCAT COUNTRY
Before making a consumer decision you should know what copper or aluminum you are purchasing before making that water block. I compiled a list of alloys.

Data Properties of each alloy. Use the search engine at the top right corner. CLICK

COPPER ALLOYS

Alloy 101 Oxygen-Free Copper: Ultra-pure copper contains virtually no oxygen and is easy to weld and braze. For high-temperature applications, terminal lugs, wire connectors, and seals. Melting point 1981° F. Hardness is 65-80 Rockwell F Scale.

Alloy 102 Oxygen-Free Copper: Similar to alloy 101 in composition and performance, however, alloy 102 is not electronic grade.

Alloy 110 Copper: Corrosion resistant, highly ductile, and very conductive. For electrical and general purpose uses. Melting point is 1981° F. Hardness is 65-80 Rockwell F Scale.

Alloy 110 Silver Plated Copper: Same properties as regular Alloy 110 Copper. Silver plating slows tarnishing while ensuring low electrical resistance at contact surfaces.

Alloy 145 Telluruim: Highly machinable and long lasting. Ideal for machining electrical components at high production rates. Melting point is 1967° F. Hardness is 42-51 Rockwell B scale.

Alloy 182 Specialty Copper: Your best bet for high-temperature applications when you need enhanced strength and electrical conductivity. Also known as Chromium Copper or RWMA Class 2 copper. Melting point is 1967° F. Hardness is 65-83 Rockwell B Scale.


ALUMINUM ALLOYS

Alloy 1100 Aluminum: Commercially pure, this alloy has more thermal and electrical conductivity than other aluminum alloys. It is not heat-treatable, it offers excellent corrosion resistance and workability, and it's easy to weld and braze. It's ideal for chemical equipment, heat exchanger fins, and sheet metal work. Yield strength is 17 ksi. Hardness is 32 Brinell. Melting range is 1190° to 1215° F.

Alloy 2011 Aluminum: Heat-treatable alloy has great machinability and fair corrosion resistance. Superior free-cutting properties make it a prime choice for screw-machine products, tube fittings, hose parts, and many other machined components. Yield strength is 43 ksi. Hardness is 95 Brinell. Melting range is 1005° to 1190° F.

Alloy 2017 Aluminum: Stronger and easier to weld than Alloy 2011, this heat-treatable alloy also offers good machinability (although it is not as easy to machine as Alloy 2011). Workability and corrosion resistance are fair. Use for screw-machine products, tube fittings, fasteners, and needles. Yield strength is 40 ksi. Hardness is 105 Brinell. Melting range is 955° to 1185° F.

Alloy 2024 Aluminum: One of the “aircraft alloys,” this heat-treatable alloy has high strength with fair formability and workability, so it works well for spot welding. Use for aircraft parts, fasteners and fittings, wheels, and scientific instruments. Yield strength is 47 ksi. Hardness is 120 Brinell. Melting range is 935° to 1180° F.

Alloy 3003 Aluminum: This alloy may be strengthened only by cold working. It is not heat treatable. Similar to Alloy 1100, but with slightly higher strength, this alloy has good weldability and workability and offers excellent corrosion resistance. Use in chemical and food-processing equipment, tanks, heat exchangers, and sheet metal work. Yield strength is 21 ksi. Hardness is 40 Brinell. Melting range is 1190° to 1210° F.

Alloy 319 Aluminum: This alloy is for general purpose casting of prototype and replacement parts. Composition is 87% aluminum, 6% silicon, 3.5% copper, 1% zinc, and 2.5% other elements. Melting range is 960° to 1200° F.

Alloy 4032 Aluminum: Featuring high silicon and nickel content, this heat-treatable alloy provides superior wear and abrasion resistance as well as good machinability. There is no need for hard-coat anodizing often required in applications using Alloy 6061. Ideal for automotive, aerospace, electronics, appliances, and hydraulic/fluid power applications. Yield strength is 46 ksi. Hardness is 120 Brinell. Melting range is 990° to 1060° F.

Alloy 5005 Aluminum: This aluminum alloy has mechanical properties similar to 3003, but is stronger. Brighter finish than alloy 5052. Readily welded and has good corrosion resistence.

Alloy 5052 Aluminum: Stronger than Alloy 3003, this alloy offers excellent corrosion resistance (especially in marine environments) as well as good weldability and workability. It is not heat treatable. Ideal for tanks and drums, marine and vehicle bodies, and fan blades. Yield strength is 28 ksi. Hardness is 60 Brinell. Melting range is 1125° to 1200° F.

Alloy 6013 Aluminum: This heat-treatable alloy offers the corrosion resistance, weldability, and thermal conductivity of Alloy 6061 with improved machinability and greater hardness. It also has the strength of Alloy 2024. When machining, this alloy breaks into small chips, reducing downtime caused by metal buildup on cutting tools. Yield strength is 62 ksi. Hardness is 130 Brinell. Melting range is 1052° to 1195° F.

Alloy 6020 Aluminum: This is a lead-free alternative to Alloy 6262 with excellent machinability. Heat treatable, this free-machining alloy produces very small, broken chips, enabling higher productivity by allowing faster machining speeds and shorter cycle times. It offers an excellent surface finish as well as superior corrosion resistance and improved anodizing response compared to the highly machinable Alloy 2011. Applications include master cylinder pistons; valves; and hydraulic parts used in automotive, fluid power, and electronics industries. Yield strength is 42 ksi. Hardness is 100 Brinell. Melting range is not available.

Alloy 6061 Aluminum: Extremely versatile, this heat-treatable alloy combines good weldability and formability, high corrosion resistance, and medium strength. Use it for chemical equipment, vehicle parts, scaffolding, and pipe fittings. Sheets also available with Hard Anodized or Chrome coating. Yield strength is 40 ksi. Hardness is 95 Brinell. Melting range is 1080° to 1205° F.

Rubber-Backed Alloy 6061 Aluminum: These versatile sheets have rubber that is molded onto Alloy 6061 Aluminum laminate forming a virtually permanent bond. Thickness of Aluminum laminate is 1/8". Yield strength is 40,000 psi. Hardness is Brinell 90.

Alloy 6063 Aluminum: Superb corrosion resistance and ready weldability make this heat-treatable alloy great for outdoor applications such as architectural trim, railing, and piping. Yield strength is 21 ksi. Hardness is 60 Brinell. Melting range is 1140° to 1210° F.

Alloy 6262 Aluminum: This heat-treatable alloy boasts excellent machinability and good corrosion resistance. It can be readily welded and accepts coatings well. It has good finishing characteristics (a bright, smooth finish is easy to obtain). Use it for valves, piston, hinges, and fittings. Yield strength is 55 ksi. Hardness is 120 Brinell. Melting range is 1080° to 1205° F.

Alloy 7068 Aluminum: Offering extreme high strength, this heat-treatable alloy is significantly stronger than Alloy 7075 with comparable corrosion resistance. Originally developed for ordnance applications, it is now being used for aircraft and vehicle parts as well as other applications requiring extreme high strength. Yield strength is 99 ksi. Hardness is 190 Brinell. Melting range is 890° to 1175° F.

Alloy 7075 Aluminum: One of the hardest aluminum alloys, this exceptionally strong, heat-treatable alloy has good machinability and fair corrosion resistance. An “aircraft alloy,” it is ideal for aviation parts, keys, gears, and other high-stress parts. Yield strength is 73 ksi. Hardness is 150 Brinell. Melting range is 890° to 1175° F.

Teflon-Coated Aluminum: Get the stability and formability of aluminum plus the nonstick characteristics of Teflon. The Teflon coating is .0005” thick on one side. Ideal for use in food packaging, as EMI/RFI shielding, and as an extra-sturdy release liner. Maximum temperature is 500° F.

Aluminum Bronze: Use for casting replacement parts and prototypes that must resist wear. Also known as Alloy 954 bronze, it consists of 83% copper, 10 to 11.5% aluminum, 3 to 5% iron, 1.5% nickel (including cobalt), and 0.5% manganese. Pouring temperature range is 2250° to 2300° F.

Alloy 630 Aluminum Bronze: This aluminum bronze offers excellent resistance to corrosion and high tensile strength. It has a hardness of Rockwell 96B and a yield strength of 65,000 psi.

Alloy 954 Aluminum Bronze: The most common aluminum bronze. For pressure-bearing surfaces where strength and hardness are a must. Also for use in high temperatures and for heavy duty road and earth-moving equipment. All forms but ingots meet ASTM B505. Ingot composition is 83% copper, 10 to 11.5% aluminum, 3 to 5% iron, 1.5% nickel (including cobalt), and 0.5% manganese.

Alloy 959 Aluminum Bronze: This alloy is characterized by high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. It can also be heat treated. Uses include a variety of heavy duty mechanical and structural products including gears, worm drives, valve guides and seats.

Alloy 642 Nonmagnetic Aluminum Bronze: The high aluminum content of this bronze make it nonmagnetic. It has excellent toughness and resistance to corrosion and can be heat treated for greater tensile strength. This metal's hardness is Rockwell 90B and its yield strength 60,000 psi.

Microporous Aluminum: Porous aluminum can be used to filter air, gases and low viscosity liquids. Sheets are made from pure aluminum powder and an epoxy resin. Material can be used to create blemish-free molds for vacuum forming and thermoforming. Temperature range: -20° F to +900° F. Hardness is 32 Brinell.

Alloy MIC-6 Cast Aluminum: This alloy features outstanding machinability and stability. Formed into cast plates, stress relieved, and precision-ground on both sides.

Aluminum Honeycomb: Use these commercial-grade core aluminum sheets to make your own composite panel combinations. Honeycomb core sheets are strong and lightweight. Fire and water resistant.
 
Last edited:

brodo

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Location
saratoga, ca
sweet knowledge!

any chance you could post what or some of the resources you used to compile this info? might help me understand better the details of these variations between copper and aluminum.
 

Tecumseh

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2002
Location
Ohio
Good work, DodgeViper, but we all know that NO alloy has as
good thermal conductivity as 100% pure metal. What I would
like to see is the thermal conductivity of each of these alloys.
Do you have this handy. Every once in a while I try to find
complete tables for each alloy online, but I never struck the
motherload.
 

SemiCycle

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
Hampton Roads. VA
On many of those, you supplied the yield strength, ksi, Hardness, and Melting range. Is there a general trend that should be consider for each of these varibles when making a buying decision?

For example, should you always look for aluminum or cooper with a yield strength above or below a certain number value?
 

SemiCycle

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
Hampton Roads. VA
Alloy 1100 Aluminum seems to be pretty impressive stuff. I bet it is pretty expensive too. Maybe the reason people always get higher temps with aluminum is because they are using the lower quality alloys. The 1100 grade alloy has more then twice the thermal conductivity of the stuff I bought from danger den (6061). Sigh.....


BTW, I like the new avatar. You wouldn't happen to own one of those, would you?
 

frostmeister

Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2002
Location
Good old UK
Ok, a quick link here to an article on this site that displays the thermal conductivity of metals at various thicknesses, the metals being aluminium, copper, silver, and copper/silver alloy.

http://www.overclockers.com/articles305/

I don't know wheer you'd get some of this "cusil" stuff but it'd be nice to see the performance of it on two identical blocks - one copper, the other CuSil alloy to see how it fares in the real world.
 

Les56

Member
Joined
May 31, 2001
Location
Wigan UK
slipknot said:
Alloy 1100 Aluminum seems to be pretty impressive stuff. I bet it is pretty expensive too. Maybe the reason people always get higher temps with aluminum is because they are using the lower quality alloys. The 1100 grade alloy has more then twice the thermal conductivity of the stuff I bought from danger den (6061). Sigh.....


BTW, I like the new avatar. You wouldn't happen to own one of those, would you?

Suspect the thermal conductivity for Aluminium Alloy 1100 is a typo and should be 128 BTU-ft/hr-ft²-°F (1540 BTU-in/hr-ft²-°F ,222 W/m-K).
Source : http://www.matweb.com/search/SpecificMaterial.asp?bassnum=MA1100
 
OP
DodgeViper

DodgeViper

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2001
Location
WILDCAT COUNTRY
Thanks Les56. Yes it was wrong. I placed the link you had given at the top. There is just to may variables to consider with all these metals. It's better to let the viewer decide then trying to list all of them.
 

NeoMoses

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2001
Searching the web for values on 6061, I've found values from K=167 W/m K to K=180 W/m K. That's not too far off from K=237 for pure aluminum. And, to date I cannot find a place that sells pure aluminum. If anyone knows of/finds a place that does, please let us know.