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FRONTPAGE Microsoft Announces Windows 11 Launch Date: October 5th, 2021

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Voodoo Rufus

Powder Junkie Moderator
Joined
Sep 20, 2001
8th gen minimum Intel CPU? Wow.....guess they don't plan on being big into backwards compatibility from here out.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
That's only four years old... wow. I thought it went back further than that.

Still W10 is supported (officially) until 2025 so that would make those processors 8+ years old. Feels better as an 8-year-old PC(?).
 

GotNoRice

Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2002
8th gen minimum Intel CPU? Wow.....guess they don't plan on being big into backwards compatibility from here out.

I've been testing Windows 11 extensivly since June, and so far I've yet to find a single computer that it did not run fantastic on. The only actual requirements check occurs during install, and there are a half-dozen or more different ways to bypass those artificial hardware checks. Once you do, actual requirements are identical to Windows 10 (basically any 64-bit X86 CPU will work).

Some of the computer's I'm running it on:

AMD Athlon64 X2 Laptop. This CPU is over 16 years old. First-generation dual-core from AMD. I even had to use Vista 64-bit drivers for the onboard video. Everything works fine.
Intel Pentium D 930 Desktop. This CPU is also 16 years old. First-generation dual-core from Intel. Basically a dual-core 64-bit Pentium 4. Also used Vista 64-bit drivers for the Intel video. Everything works fine.
Intel Q6600 Desktop. This CPU is about 14 years old. Basically the first quad-core CPU from Intel. Works great and most drivers were installed from Windows Update despite the age of the hardware.
Intel 2500K (5Ghz) Desktop. Old workhorse that is about a decade old now. Works great and all drivers were installed automatically. This is actually my vintage gaming rig (with XP and 7 on other hard drives). Running 2x Radeon 6870 in Crossfire, and despite the age of those cards Windows 11 installed drivers and even asked to enable Crossfire automatically.
Intel 5820k (4.5Ghz) Desktop. This is my backup for my main desktop, on a KVM. This is the last computer I installed it on before I installed it on my main computer, so that I could do gaming tests. Everything works great, including the 3x GTX680 cards in 3-way SLI.
AMD 5900X Desktop. This is my main computer and I finally upgraded it to Windows 11 a few weeks ago. This is the ONLY computer where I didn't actually bypass the install requirements when I installed Windows 11.

I also have about 6 or 7 Intel i5 and i7 laptops that are about 4-8 years old. I forgot the exact CPU in each but every single one upgraded to Windows 11 (once install requirements were bypassed) without any issue and they all run great.

Some of these older computers have actually shown improvement from upgrading to Windows 11 whereas with my newer/faster computers (such as the 5820k and 5900X) I did not really notice much change. Windows 11 includes optimizations to the windows scheduler that heavily prioritize the active application or game, and when you are CPU limited this actually seems to help quite a bit, keeping the system feeling snappy rather than sluggish even when CPU is at or near 100%.
 

Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
https://www.pcgamer.com/uk/windows-11-pcs-can-hobble-gaming-performance/

"Microsoft 'will be enabling VBS on most new PCs over this next year' and that can tank PC gaming performance by around 25%."

"Despite Microsoft's claims that "if you're a gamer, Windows 11 was made for you" you will need to watch out for future prebuilt PCs with the new OS factory installed. That's because the Big M is enabling more security features in PCs by default, and one in particular can seriously tank gaming performance. In our testing, that can add up to as much as a 28% drop in average frame rates. And you thought the TPM 2.0 restrictions were a pain... That sort of frame rate delta is like dropping down an entire tier of graphics card and, in these days where GPUs are so hard to come by, Microsoft gimping the performance of the chip in your newbuild machine would surely be hard for gamers to stomach.

The issue is Virtualization-Based Security (VBS), a setting introduced into Windows 10 which uses hardware and software virtualisation to enhance the security of your system. It basically creates an isolated subsystem that helps prevent malware from screwing your PC. Microsoft explains it as follows: "VBS uses hardware virtualization features to create and isolate a secure region of memory from the normal operating system. Windows can use this 'virtual secure mode' to host a number of security solutions, providing them with greatly increased protection from vulnerabilities in the operating system, and preventing the use of malicious exploits which attempt to defeat protections."

It's a feature mainly intended for enterprise customers to be able to lock down the corporate PCs they drop into their offices and make sure they don't get compromised. And if you're upgrading from Windows 10 to Windows 11 then you don't have to worry about VBS being enabled, unless you were already running an enterprise version of the older OS, that is. The issue comes if you're receiving a machine which has had an OEM build of Windows 11 installed on it."

"The thing to note, though, is that VBS is not enabled by default for all clean installs of Windows 11. I downloaded the latest ISO version of the OS in order to check VBS out on our test rig, but had to do some registry editing, and BIOS tweaking, in order to actually enable it. So, it's nothing to be concerned about if you're just grabbing a Windows 11 download for a fresh install yourself. But Windows 11 PCs, built by the biggest OEMs, such as Dell, HP, and Lenovo, are looking likely to come with VBS as standard. What we're not clear about, however, is whether those companies' gaming brands will also have VBS enabled. Or whether system builders will be exempt and can continue to ship gaming PCs without VBS."
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I believe if you upgrade to W11 (read: update w10 to w11, not a fresh install) it's enabled? A clean install and it's disabled.

A solution was to disable virtualization in the bios as VBS relies on that to he active.
 

Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Prebuilt's from HP (possibly others) usually don't allow those type of changes in BIOS? Would need a quick check on major brands to be sure :shrug:
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
EDIT: that information was from an email from UL.

In our testing with pre-release builds of Windows 11, a feature called Virtualization-based Security (VBS) causes performance to drop. VBS is enabled by default after a clean install of Windows 11, but not when upgrading from Windows 10. This means the same system can get different benchmark scores depending on how Windows 11 was installed and whether VBS is enabled or not. We plan to add VBS detection to our benchmarks in a future update to help you compare scores fairly.
 

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Poking into that pcgamer article and looking at their results, I have to wonder if it is something to do with the "VM" talking to the GPU. I'd have to assume that the OS will not let software talk directly to GPU, and the extra translation layer added is what's choking that performance. That that they're claiming big differences at 1440p ultra, suggests is it not just "CPU" but something holding back the GPU. I don't have the understanding to try to work it out further.

I'm not motivated enough to attempt testing this myself at this time, but I'd look at the GPU IO load for a clue as next step. Is it much different, and if so, in which direction? I think it could go either way, obviously meaning something different in doing so.

Similarly I don't know what potential solutions there may be other than disabling it totally. Whitelisting games for direct access would be a bad workaround. A secure but gaming optimised express communication might be a possibility.
 

dejo

Senior Moment Senior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2001
you can search msinfo to see if it is enabled on your system. It is the 6th up from the bottom on this snippet vbs.png