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MOcA vs Wireless extender?

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myndlessdayz

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Location
City of Sin
Moved my rig to the opposite side of the house but now its not close enough to the router to hardline my computer. Moving my whole modem/router would be inefficient for the rest of the household's internet needs so I've decided on trying to extend my range by going with a MOcA adapter like Actiontec MOcA 2.0 Adapter or some decent AC WiFi Extender. I'm currently using Netgear PL1200 Powerline and it doesn't work as well as my wireless assuming my wireless is working correctly...

Has anyone used or is currently using a MOcA adapter? It seems to be the route I'm most leaning towards doing right now although a WiFi extender is more cost effective.
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
I have...and love it (here is the link to what I used: http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php/768868-MoCA-2-0-Ethernet-over-Coax)

Post #20 shows my network diagram.

I'm using the Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 adapters. For the best speed, you want to use the bonded adapters.

Make sure you look for and find all of the cable splitters and amplifiers that are in your cabling. The Actiontec devices work in the 1000 MHz to 1500 MHz frequency band. In the US, most cable TV operates below 1000 MHz. So, the splitters and amplifiers that are in your house are probably the <1000 MHz kind...which will greatly attenuate the MoCA 2.0 signal.

If you look at my post, I recommended a splitter to use. What's important is that you get a splitter that is bi-directional (meaning that it has the same transmit and return loss). Otherwise, you will have different speeds up versus down.

Also, you will want to get a MoCA lower pass filter and put it inline with your cable modem if you have one, and any cable box. You won't need this if you connect the cable box to the output of the Actiontec adapter as it only passes < 1000 MHz.

I isolated my "MoCA 2.0 circuit" onto it's own line of coax cabling, and moved the existing cable amplifier to power the rest of the outlets in the house.

I'm getting consistently 800+ Mbps with it...glad I did this!

I think I spent less than $200 on the 2 MoCA 2.0 adapters, splitters, and LPF.

Good luck...and let me know if you need any help picking parts or getting it setup!
 

Mpegger

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
I'm assuming you're considering moca cause you already have the coax there, and it begins and terminates at those locations needed? If not, why not just run some Cat5E (or 6)? Much more flexible and easier to run/hide then RG6Q.
 
Last edited:
OP
M

myndlessdayz

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Location
City of Sin
I have...and love it (here is the link to what I used: http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php/768868-MoCA-2-0-Ethernet-over-Coax)

Post #20 shows my network diagram.

I'm using the Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 adapters. For the best speed, you want to use the bonded adapters.

Make sure you look for and find all of the cable splitters and amplifiers that are in your cabling. The Actiontec devices work in the 1000 MHz to 1500 MHz frequency band. In the US, most cable TV operates below 1000 MHz. So, the splitters and amplifiers that are in your house are probably the <1000 MHz kind...which will greatly attenuate the MoCA 2.0 signal.

If you look at my post, I recommended a splitter to use. What's important is that you get a splitter that is bi-directional (meaning that it has the same transmit and return loss). Otherwise, you will have different speeds up versus down.

Also, you will want to get a MoCA lower pass filter and put it inline with your cable modem if you have one, and any cable box. You won't need this if you connect the cable box to the output of the Actiontec adapter as it only passes < 1000 MHz.

I isolated my "MoCA 2.0 circuit" onto it's own line of coax cabling, and moved the existing cable amplifier to power the rest of the outlets in the house.

I'm getting consistently 800+ Mbps with it...glad I did this!

I think I spent less than $200 on the 2 MoCA 2.0 adapters, splitters, and LPF.

Good luck...and let me know if you need any help picking parts or getting it setup!

What's the difference between the bonded and non-bonded? My google-fu sucks and it hasn't turned up much of anything.
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
It's in the Ethernet standard. A bonded unit means the two units talking use bonded frequency channel = higher PHY rate = higher MAC rate = higher link speed.

Unbounded MoCA devices are lower cost, and top out at a max of 600 Mbps.

Bonded MoCA devices cost a bit more, but top out over 1000 Mbps. (Theoretical max is 1400 Mbps).

Google "MoCA 2.0 standard".

:thup:


 
OP
M

myndlessdayz

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Location
City of Sin
Thanks! Ill have to check Amazon to see if they have them in stock there as newegg are OOS for the bonded. He ones I linked are 2.0 but don't say they are. But I'm leaning towards going MOcA over an extender although the higher cost.
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
Just checked...they have them in stock now!

Be sure to check you splitters on the cable line.

Check out the link I posted...I gave a lot of info in there and posted my network diagram too.

Let me know if you have any questions!