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MOD a thermal-controlled fan to blow at FULL SPEED

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dalilman52

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Location
Houston
Do u HATE how your thermal-controlled fan blows at such ridiculously low speeds that it barely blows any air?

the reason for this is because the temperature sensor is placed on the fan, not exactly a very "smart" fan, since the air on/around the fan doesnt ge veryt hot, the fan wont speed up, so if u want it to blow faster, then just find the thermal sensor, its a little green thing placed where the wires come out of the fan

now first step -

1) snip the wire as close as possible to the thermosistor (the green thing, basically it lets more flow of electricity thru when its hotter, psu's also use em) so that the wire is as long as possible, now strip the wires so that u have two bare wires

2) twist the two wires (or if u like a more professional approach, u can solder them together, but it was too much of a hassle to me so i went ahead and twisted) together and then isolate the connection either by putting tape over it or with heat-shrink

now ur "smart" fan blows at full speed!

(for owners of SFI)
another more clean but a bit risky because some wires may be disconected if u arent careful, the way to do this is pull the sticker up a little over where the fan is connected to the wires

u will see a bunch of wires coming out of the fan on a mini-circuit board

remember those two wires that u cut? there is a red and yellow wire, the yellow wire is closer to view and easier to access then the red one, the red one is underneath the plastic casing of the fan

so 1st, pull the yellow wire out so that there is just the solder point left, then solder the red wire to where the yellow one used to be (i just did this a few minutes ago and felt i could write a tutorial because the twist wire method was just too sloppy IMO)

i made a new thread so more ppl would read it, and not just owners of the thermaltake smart fan I
 

GM1010

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
Just as an addition, if you want to make it manually adjustable, just run wires from each side of the thermistor and attach to a pot.
 
OP
dalilman52

dalilman52

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Location
Houston
GM1010 said:
Just as an addition, if you want to make it manually adjustable, just run wires from each side of the thermistor and attach to a pot.

well yeah, but couldnt u also put the pot on the 12v going to the fan?
 

GM1010

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
I don't really know, probably. It was just something I tried once and worked so I thought I'd add.
 
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dalilman52

dalilman52

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Location
Houston
np people, and if u dont like how fast it spins (the SFI at full speed blows as much air as the SFII at full speed) u dont have to cut that much wire off of the thermosistor, u may wanna leave just a bit of wire on so that u can solder it back on at a later time
 

mccoyn

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2003
Location
Michigan, USA
I'd be a little worried about just twisting the wires together. They can corrode and the connection can break over time. It probally won't break, but it does significantly increase the chance of failure of a very important component.

You don't even have to remove the thermosistor. You can just short the two wires on either side. Since you leave the original parts intact, this would provide a backup in case your short fails. You could even put the short on a switch to allow you to switch between full speed and temperature controlled.
 
OP
dalilman52

dalilman52

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Location
Houston
mccoyn said:
I'd be a little worried about just twisting the wires together. They can corrode and the connection can break over time. It probally won't break, but it does significantly increase the chance of failure of a very important component.

You don't even have to remove the thermosistor. You can just short the two wires on either side. Since you leave the original parts intact, this would provide a backup in case your short fails. You could even put the short on a switch to allow you to switch between full speed and temperature controlled.

well geez, u dont have to get all technical on me, im only a sophomore in HS, i only made this tutorial to help ppl out, and yeah i suggested soldering over twisting, and u can just remove the thermisistor itself becuase it is useless, i was thinking of just taking the rheostat from a SFII and just stripping both ends and soldering it to the wires where the thermosistor used to be, and maknig it into a SFII (well, almost)
 

nosilverman

Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2003
Location
New York, NY!
If you want to keep the thermal controled thing, just make it go faster, maybe you could hook up the wires up to one of the temp sensors for a lcd, the ones that have long wires. Then you could put the sensor wherever you want to

btw, i'me also a softmore in highschool:)