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Multiplier list

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Molybdym

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2002
Location
Carrboro, NC
I'm asking the greater powers that be if someone can reply to this with a list of P4 multipliers. And as an aside to this, which is more stable:

lower multi + higher fsb

or

higher multi + lower fsb

I'm somewhat new to overclocking, and am wanting to change out one of my components, either motherboard or processor. thanks
 

kamilkluczewski

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2002
Location
Canada
ALLWAYS!

Allways lower multi higher band, this gives you optimal mem transfer and improved performance, the CPUs these days alreary run past every app in the scale, unless you use photoshop or other stuff you never will use 24million clock cycles in second reffering to (2.4Ghz P4).

Your 2.26 or 1.8a are optimal overclockers.

God Speed in your OC journey.

Kam
 
OP
Molybdym

Molybdym

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2002
Location
Carrboro, NC
My P4S533 can only run upto 150MHz fsb, great for high multi processors, but my 2.4b is stuck at 18. . .meaning 2.7GHz. I'm itchin to get to 3.0GHz(maybe that will stop my sleepless nights). I've been looking at the 1.8a, but never put much stock into the 2.26, what are the multi's on that?
 

batboy

Senior Moment
Joined
Jan 12, 2001
Location
Kansas, USA
Strictly in terms of stability, both higher and low multiplier CPUs can be perfectly be stable, as long as you don't push either of them too far. In regard to performance, you'll get better benchmarks (especially memory scores) from a lower multiplier overclocked with a higher FSB.
 

batboy

Senior Moment
Joined
Jan 12, 2001
Location
Kansas, USA
Ok, let's say we have one system with a P-4 2.4 (24X100=2400 MHz) CPU in it and you have an extra 2.4B (18X133=2400 MHz) CPU. Clock speed of the system is 2.4 gig regardless of whuch CPU you use. However, let's say you have really good DDR RAM that you're running at a direct 1:1 ratio (just to make it simple). That means the memory bus runs faster as you increase FSB. Therefore, the memory bus has more bandwidth (more data tranferring capacity) when you are running the 133 FSB than if you're running at 100 FSB. So, you'll have better performance and higher benchmarks using the 2.4B CPU running at 133 FSB than you would using the 100 FSB 2.4 CPU (assuming everything else remains the same). Hope this makes sense now.