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My Friend Wants To Fold Potatos

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Yuriman

Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Location
The OCFORUMS
Ok, my friend thought there were too many people folding OUR protiens, and he wants to further research on potatos. Dont ask why, you'd rather not know, but could someone compile something to make him happy? He hates his idle processes, but is a stuborn jackass.
 

David

Forums Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2001
Yuriman said:
Ok, my friend thought there were too many people folding OUR protiens, and he wants to further research on potatos. Dont ask why, you'd rather not know, but could someone compile something to make him happy? He hates his idle processes, but is a stuborn jackass.

"But... of course folding at home ...uhh... investigates potatoes as well.... ;)"
 

bubba gump

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2002
Location
CA, USA
Folding potatoes? Come on i rarely say this but id rather SETI than do that (no offence to SETI's)

Tell him that if he is wondering why we fold hte "same" protein over and over, is because of something called "Run, Clone, Gen (Generation)"....different types of the "same" protein i think so that we get different results and different things happening! Thus why some fold faster than others
 

CJ145

Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2002
Location
Seattle, WA
isin't it actuley like this?

protein geta a name
protein gets divided into 10000's of work packets
those 10000's of packets get sent out 100x each
so you may be folding the same protein but it's a different part of it

i think it's somehting like that...
 

BBigJ

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Bay Area, CA
Most, if not all, of the proteins we are folding are chosen for their simplicity or structural characteristics. They are not chosen for their relationship to any specific organism or disease. I suspect that most of the proteins we are folding come from bacteria (E. coli), or mouse, or worm (C. elegans). This isn't as useless as it might sound. First, we are still trying to learn how folding works and how to predict protein structure, and secondly, most proteins exist in all organisms with relatively few changes.
 

DeepScience

Super Kiwi
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Location
New Zealand
xsquared_uk said:
Yes indeed! We might well share 98 percent of our genes with chimpanzees, but we also share 47 percent with cabbages so it's all interelated anyway!

I do believe its only 95% and 98% is for humans and mice.
So wowee, macro evolution is still a crock
 

nikhsub1

Unoriginal Macho Moderator
Joined
Oct 12, 2001
Location
Los Angeles
Yuriman said:
Ok, my friend thought there were too many people folding OUR protiens, and he wants to further research on potatos. Dont ask why, you'd rather not know, but could someone compile something to make him happy? He hates his idle processes, but is a stuborn jackass.
:rolleyes: